Get Published | Subscribe | About | Write for Our Blog    

Blog.

Monthly Archives:


vbac-tol-recommendations.Par.0001.Image.250.gif

After years of recommending against vaginal birth after cesarean (VBAC), a NIH consensus panel has called for women to have greater access to the procedure and for women to be able to exercise greater choice over which birthing method (whether repeat cesarean or VBAC) is right for them, says AAFP News Now.

What prompted this change in policy, you might ask? A trumping of women’s rights and autonomous choice in reproduction? Not so much. In fact, the recommendation of TOL (trial of labor) before opting for cesarean is based on new evidence that often the outcome for baby and mother is just as good with VBAC as with repeat cesareans.…

Full Article


AJB-8(12)_FINAL-REVISED-95.jpg

As previously published in the December 2008 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics, Johns Hopkins researchers Czarny et al told us that medical and nursing students watch television medical dramas in droves (almost 80% of them) and are exposed to moral dilemmas in those dramas that way.

But to our shock, how the characters in those dramas handle those moral problems is more than a little disappointing. Not only are the docs (and nurses) in shows like Grey’s Anatomy and House M.D. faced with moral problems, they often create them. And when they are in the midst of these problems, they often do the wrong thing.…

Full Article

03/26/2010 Second Seed

basketball.jpg

Yes, apparently it’s true, according to the Kansas City Star, that March Madness and vasectomies are linked.

Men willingly choose to schedule this somewhat uncomfortable procedure during the Big Tournament, specifically. Why? What better time to be laid up on the couch with frozen peas between your legs, right? (Just don’t get TOO excited as Northern Iowa beats Kansas!)

Not only is there a link between men scheduling vasectomies during the men’s NCAA basketball tournament, some doctors are even using it as a marketing ploy. The Oregon Urology Clinic in Eugene’s “Snip City 2010” featured Dick Vitale (I wonder if he said the usual “It’s Awesome, Baby!”) telling potential patients to “take care of the equipment and lower your seed for the tourney.”

Oddly, I find this disturbing–the use of sporting events as the deciding factors for major reproductive decisions.…

Full Article


The Bioethics Channel at the Center for Practical Bioethics presents an ethical analysis of the historical passage of health care reform.

John Carney, MHA, Rosemary Flanigan, PhD, and Tarris Rosell, PhD, D.Min, each offer commentary about what health care reform means for the nation now and in the future–from an ethical perspective.

To listen to the podcast, click here.

You can also read Dr. Flanigan’s blog post on the subject Health Reform: Not Perfect, But A Start at the Center’s website as well.

Summer Johnson, PhD…

Full Article


It comes as no surprise, to me anyway, that doctors would be catching on to the value of social networking on Facebook for marketing of their practices. But what are the ethical bounds of using social networks for the existing patients under a doctor’s care?

facebook logo.jpg

According to a recent study by Harvard researcher David Brendel, the “friending” process between doctors and patients was explored to find an ethical way for the physician-patient relationship to remain intact via social networking. Here is what he came up with, according to his own press release:

  • Address a patient’s online invitation immediately and in person to avoid any damage to the therapeutic relationship.

Full Article


And just when you were beginning to worry that national health care reform might not effect you have no fear. Nicely tucked away inside the health reform bill in Section 2572 is the mandate that chain restaurants with more than 20 locations display nutritional and caloric information for all of their consumers, says WSJ Health Blog.

subsubmen.jpg

Will this slow or prevent the fattening of America, the obesity epidemic we are facing? Only time will tell. But it is a step in the right direction, a relatively low-cost measure on the part of government and business to give consumers the power to make informed eating choices.…

Full Article


AJB10(3)_final.jpg

Trans fat bans, peer recruitment for human subjects research, and the clash of culture versus the rights of physicians are the featured issues in this month’s issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

First, David Resnik’s article questions the limits of government intervention on banning a particular food, or specifically food chemical, and how effective it might be, and the ethical justification for it.

Second, the ethics of a new method for recruiting human subjects in research involving peer-to-peer recruitment is questioned. Is it okay to have the community members involved in research recruit more study subjects? Are they biased or are they they most informed recruiters?…

Full Article


AJB10(3)_final.jpg

Will banning artificial trans fats today effect your ability to have a hot dog tomorrow?

On the The Bioethics Channel, Lorell LaBoube seeks an answer from David Resnik, a bioethicist and IRB chair for the National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences at the National Institutes of Health.

Dr. Resnik writes about this in the March 2010 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics.

Summer Johnson, PhD…

Full Article

This morning I awoke to a news report by National Public Radio's Joe Palca on promising developments in gene transfer. In it, Palca provided a good account of the field's travails, as well as some encouraging developments in the last few years. The sto...

Full Article

This morning I awoke to a news report by National Public Radio's Joe Palca on promising developments in gene transfer. In it, Palca provided a good account of the field's travails, as well as some encouraging developments in the last few years. The sto...

Full Article