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02/19/2011

Docs Who Give Bad Tweet: Unprofessional or Just Uneducated?

Social networking among physicians is raising concerns for a variety of obvious reasons–it challenges our standard ways of thinking about the physician-patient relationship which for the most part has been confined to the exam room. Now social networks open up physicians and patients to each other in entirely new ways–some of which researchers suggest are not altogether positive.

According to a recent study published in the February 9th issue of JAMA, out of “5,156 “tweets” sent by 260 U.S. physicians, each with 500 or more followers, last May, researchers found that 3 percent were unprofessional.” (See story at Businessweek.com)

What does this really mean?…

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This entry was posted in Health Care, Media and tagged , , . Posted by sysadmin. Bookmark the permalink.

02/18/2011

February Issue of AJOB Is Now Online

It’s February and our next issue of AJOB is now available online.

AJB 11(2)_2_final.jpg

This month the first of our Target Articles is authored by Peter Ubel and Robert Silbergelt on behavioral equipoise as an alternative to clinical equipoise. Their view is rebutted by Alex London, Jerry Menikoff, Katherine Wasson, and others.

Our second Target Article, by Dominic Wilkinson, argues for a new standard in withdrawing treatment from premature newborns. His article, “A Life Worth Giving?”, is debated by John Paris, Alexander Kon, and Robert Truog.

You can also hear Dr. Peter Ubel, one of this month’s Target Article authors, speaking about his AJOB Target Article on The Bioethics Channel.…

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02/17/2011

Health, Illness and Ethnicity conference

Two-day Conference: ‘Health, Illness and Ethnicity: Migration, Discrimination and Social Dislocation’

Centre for the History of Medicine in Ireland, University College Dublin, 10-11 June 2011

Organisers Catherine Cox (University College Dublin), Hilary Marland (University of Warwick) and Sarah York (University College Dublin and University of Warwick).

This two-day Wellcome Trust funded conference will focus on the relationship between illness and migration, discrimination and social dislocation. By migration, we refer to both migration between countries and internal movements of populations, for example between regions or from rural to urban areas. Our focus is primarily on the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, but we are also interested in exploring the relationship between historical concerns surrounding health and ethnicity and current health practice and policy. The workshop is intended to contribute to debates on the susceptibility of specific groups to medical interventions, as well as interpretations of the relationship between health and illness, migration and ethnicity, and the management of the health and illness of ethnic groups within broader health and welfare strategies. The workshop will explore the experiences of particular groups, be these ‘foreigners’, migratory peoples, patients of varied religious denominations and those suffering from particular disorders or diseases. Participants will include keynote speaker Alison Bashford, Roberta Bivins, Kat Foxhall, Alan Ingram and John Welshman. The conference will also provide the organisers with an opportunity to present on their project on ‘Madness, Migration and the Irish in Lancashire, c.1850-1921’ (funded by the Wellcome Trust). We are keen to involve a mix of early career and established scholars, historians and academics from a broad range of disciplines, policy makers and practitioners in the conference.

We request that titles and abstracts for the conference be submitted by 1 March 2011. Abstracts should be c 500 words and include a title and summary of the paper, as well as details of the address, email and telephone numbers of the speaker(s). The workshop will be held at University College Dublin. Local costs for hotel accommodation (2 nights) and meals will be covered by the organisers, but we ask participants, where possible, to cover the costs of their travel to Dublin drawing on their own institutional resources. Modest funds may be available to cover the travel costs of speakers lacking institutional support.

Please contact either Catherine Cox or Sarah York for further information.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Giskin Day. Bookmark the permalink.

02/15/2011

Prenatal Surgery, Hope for Spina Bifida and Ethical Reflection

Spina bifida is a serious developmental birth defect in which the spinal cord and backbone fail to develop completely and infants may be born with some of the spinal cord protruding out of their middle or lower back. Treatment typically involves surgery as soon as possible to repair the birth defect. There are different forms […]

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02/15/2011

Eugenic or Not, Sterilization Makes Sense for “P”

The current case before a British judge as to whether a mentally disabled woman identified only as “P” should be sterilized has raised the ire of medical ethicists and the disability community. The question that I can’t seem to answer is: “Why?”

As someone who supports the decision to sterilize “P”, I can say that I do so not because I think that there is anything concerning about her genes. What is concerning is that she is unable to care for her own child or herself. It is her incapacity, as a parent and as a decision-maker, that gives her mother, and the British court, the right to make such decisions about her reproductive best interests.…

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This entry was posted in Genetics and tagged , , , . Posted by sysadmin. Bookmark the permalink.

02/14/2011

German Anesthetist Faces Massive Retraction of Published Research Articles

A German anesthetist, Joachim Boldt, has published over 350 peer-reviewed papers and is currently the target of a German medical board investigation for data manipulation, fabrication of data and failure to have human studies reviewed and approved by an ethics review board. This story began when the journal Anesthesia and Analgesia retracted a 2009 article […]

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02/08/2011

Dirty Windows of Drug Development

Think of clinical trial data as a window on the efficacy and safety of a drug. Think of data protection and trade secrecy as soot. The above picture? This is the public view on drug safety and efficacy.According to a recent report in Nature Biotechnolo...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , , , , , . Posted by Jonathan Kimmelman. Bookmark the permalink.

02/08/2011

Dirty Windows of Drug Development

Think of clinical trial data as a window on the efficacy and safety of a drug. Think of data protection and trade secrecy as soot. The above picture? This is the public view on drug safety and efficacy.According to a recent report in Nature Biotechnolo...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , , , , , . Posted by Jonathan Kimmelman. Bookmark the permalink.

02/04/2011

Caplan Discusses Ghosts of Bioethics’ Present, Past and Future

On Point of Inquiry, Art Caplan discusses how bioethics has “come of age” and what questions are likely to engage the field in the future. The interview with Chris Mooney is one not to miss.

Favorite quotes:

“[Palin’s] death panels are pure malarkey. But we have death panels now: they are called insurance company benefit panels.”

“At the end of the day people aren’t going to be interested in cloning humans. They will be interested in engineering them–to improve our genes, tweak our genes, enhance ourselves through diet or implants.” In other words, why clone the same old person you already have when you can get a better one through genetic manipulation, Crestor, organic foods and a conventional plastic surgery or even better stem cell transplants?…

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