Blog RSSBlog.

04/13/2015

A Not-So-Open Discussion

Courtney Thiele posted on March 3oth about an article in the Washington Post describing “a new push to de-stigmatize the nation’s most controversial medical procedure by talking about it openly and unapologetically.” A clinic in Maryland called “Carafem” dispenses abortion pills, and “promises a ‘spa-like’ experience for women with an open and unabashed approach to pregnancy termination.” (quotations from the Washington Post’s article)

This clinic is no doubt trying to move the experience of abortion as far away from Gosnellian horrors as possible. But despite the claims of the owners (and the Washington Post), their own terms reveal that it is not openness they seek, but a façade to hide the truth.

Whenever we hear the term “stigma,” we know that we’re getting lectured about judgmental people who are imposing their bad thoughts, and seeking to infringe upon someone’s freedom. The term in medical use describes a “mark” due to some condition, and therefore a natural consequence and characteristic identifier. In non-medical parlance, it has come to represent an externally imposed non-physical mark, unfairly applied.

For those wishing to deflect criticism, this is a useful word. It serves to convey the impression that if we feel anything negative about an entity or act, it is the fault of external forces, usually having malevolent intent. “Stigma” becomes a surrogate—a strawman—for “guilt” and “shame.” The founders of this clinic, of course, are trying to sell abortion, and trying to blame the guilt that participants may feel on judgmental others.

Most revealing is the clinic staff’s use of a term describing the abortion itself. They dodge the truth when they state how the abortion pill will “pass the pregnancy.” Pregnancy, as we know, is a state of being, not something to pass out of one’s body. It occurs because something is in the body, namely an embryo or fetus. By misusing the term, the clinic staff belies their understanding that the issue is about the human being of the embryo. But, if they acknowledge its being then moral questions must arise, and their goal of casual and stress-free abortion fails. Better to not acknowledge it. Simply talk around it, by substituting a misleading term, and we can pretend there isn’t really a person there.

I’ve seen enough about the coarsening of our culture to have a general sense of pessimism about the ability for many to see through this verbal obfuscation. Still, the sense that a pregnancy is a human is not going to go away, and unlikely to be something the modern public is oblivious to, especially with technological advances in ultrasonography. I doubt that there will be a time when those who take part in abortion are completely free from the burden of guilt, knowing that what they have passed was not simply their condition, but someone on our common path toward birth.

Comments are closed.