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10/29/2015

No ID in NC: Undocumented immigrants and the Identification Problem

Nancy Berlinger

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10/29/2015

Shared Decision Making in ICUs

Lead author Alex Kon
The American College of Critical Care Medicine and American Thoracic Society have issued a new policy statement on shared decision making in ICUs.

They endorse six recommendations: 
  1. Shared decision making is a collaborative process that allows patients, or their surrogates, and clinicians to make healthcare decisions together, taking into account the best scientific evidence available, as well as the patient’s values, goals, and preferences.  
  2. Clinicians should engage in a shared decision making process to define overall goals of care (including decisions regarding limiting or withdrawing life-prolonging interventions) and when making major treatment decisions that may be affected by personal values, goals, and preferences.
  3. Clinicians should use as their “default” approach a shared decision making process that includes three main elements: information exchange, deliberation, and making a treatment decision. 
  4. A wide range of decision-making approaches are ethically supportable, including patient- or surrogate-directed and clinician-directed models. Clinicians should tailor the decisionmaking process based on the preferences of the patient or surrogate. 
  5. Clinicians should be trained in communication skills. 
  6. Research is needed to evaluate decision-making strategies.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/29/2015

Balancing Your Remaining Time [EOL in Art 171]

Recently used in an NPR story on AID and VSED.

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10/29/2015

Should my mentors look like me?

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

This past week I attended the annual American Society of Bioethics and Humanities (ASBH) meeting in Houston, Texas. One of my favorite ASBH activities is seeing members who I consider mentors and members who are I consider to be informal mentors. While at the conference I reflected on the value of mentorship. I reflected on my luck in finding really great mentors who are active leaders in the bioethics community, great professors to their students, and mentors who have always been encouraging and helpful to me in my budding career in bioethics. But it is not lost on me that only a few of my mentors look like me.…

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10/28/2015

Can a 5-year-old refuse treatment: The Case of Julianna Snow

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Julianna Snow is a 5-year-old who suffers from Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease, a neurodegenerative illness. This is the most common of all inherited neurological disorders (about 1 in 2,500 people have it). The disease usually is noticed in adolescence or early adulthood. For Julianna, the disease affects not only movement but swallowing and breathing. She is subjected to NT suctioning every few hours to remove the mucus that accumulates. Her decline was rapid and severe. Michelle and Steve Snow have written extensive blogs about their experiences and conversations.

Julianna’s prognosis is not good. Her parents sat her down and explained that heaven is “where she’ll be able to run and play and eat, none of which she can do now.

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This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, End of Life Care, Featured Posts, Pediatrics and tagged , , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

10/28/2015

Fresh Territory for Bioethics: Silicon Valley

Susan Gilbert

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10/28/2015

"Death: The Human Experience" at Bristol Museum [EOL in Art 170]

"Death: The Human Experience" at the Bristol Museum includes hundreds of incredibly diverse objects – from a Ghanaian fantasy coffin to a Victorian mourning dress – reveal captivating stories from cultures across the world, from the earliest human societies to the modern day.

The exhibition encourages you to consider ethical issues, different attitudes to death and how different cultures have dealt with the end of life.  As a society we are reluctant to talk about death and dying. death: the human experience is about helping to start that conversation.


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10/27/2015

Pre-Approval Access: Can Compassion, Business, and Medicine Coexist?

Tomorrow and Thursday in New York City is an expert-rich conference on compassionate use. Patients who have a serious or life threatening condition for which no satisfactory alternative therapy exists and who cannot enter a clinical trial may, under c...

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10/27/2015

"Death: The Human Experience" [EOL in Art 169]

"Death: The Human Experience" at the Bristol Museum & Art Gallery just opened and explores responses to death through hundreds of objects and stories from across the world, from ancient times to modern day. In January, the exhibit will include "de...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/27/2015

Managing Requests for Futile Interventions

This is a lucid introductory overview to managing requests for futile interventions.  It has an Australian focus, but is relevant and useful for others too.

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