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10/10/2016

Christianity and Physician-Assisted Suicide (2)

October 10, 2016

A few blogs ago, I discussed a Time op-ed that spoke of a Christian perspective to physician assisted suicide. Understanding that Christian is a hopelessly ambiguous term, I wanted to see if there was anything noticeably Christian about the op-ed.

My reflection at the time was that any advocate of PAS – Christian, religious, spiritual, or secular—could have written the piece. The only spiritual elements were prayer and having peace with the decision.

Last week Archbishop Emeritus and Nobel Peace Prize laureate Desmond Tutu wrote an op-ed in the Washington Post stating that as he grows older, he wants to lend his voice to the cause of “death with dignity.” What makes Tutu’s op-ed interesting to me is that he couches his conclusion in the language of Christianity: “In refusing dying people the right to die with dignity, we fail to demonstrate the compassion that lies at the heart of Christian values.”

The question, of course, is whether or not PAS is an adequate expression of Christian compassion to the dying? Tutu places the choice starkly: if you don’t allow PAS, people will suffer horribly. It is almost as if to him palliative care is a non-entity. He overlooks the historic Christian example of providing comfort and support to the dying, be it the believers of the early church or the contemporary hospice movement.

I have long agreed with those who think that love should be at the center of Christian ethics, because of its central place in the teaching of Jesus (see the “Two Commandments” of Matt 12:37-38). Tutu’s invoking of compassion as the Christian basis of PAS makes me think that further clarification of what it means to love is very much needed.

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