Get Published | Subscribe | About | Write for Our Blog    

Posted on October 24, 2016 at 8:59 AM

Jahi McMath turns 16 years old today.


She was declared dead in December 2013.  She was 13 years old at the time.  Since then, her organs have been artificially sustained in a private New Jersey home.


In ongoing separate state and federal lawsuits in San Francisco, Jahi’s parents are seeking judicial declarations that she is now alive (again).


If they can do that, the case will be a compelling counterexample to the prevailing notion of brain death.  Legally the concept requires that the cessation of brain function be “irreversible.”  If Jahi is now alive, then the way in which U.S. clinicians determine brain death is not legally sufficient.


Posted on

Jahi McMath turns 16 years old today.


She was declared dead in December 2013.  She was 13 years old at the time.  Since then, her organs have been artificially sustained in a private New Jersey home.


In ongoing separate state and federal lawsuits in San Francisco, Jahi’s parents are seeking judicial declarations that she is now alive (again).


If they can do that, the case will be a compelling counterexample to the prevailing notion of brain death.  Legally the concept requires that the cessation of brain function be “irreversible.”  If Jahi is now alive, then the way in which U.S. clinicians determine brain death is not legally sufficient.

Comments are closed.