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03/11/2017

But at least we don’t have socialized medicine

I just read T. R. Teid’s 2009 book The Healing of America. It’s a timely read in light of the bar brawl over health care that’s brewing in the U.S. legislature this week. Of particular interest are his snapshots of the health care systems of the UK, France, Germany, Japan, Taiwan, Canada, and Switzerland, systems about which I held many cherished misconceptions. All of these countries provide universal health care coverage for their citizens, but they do so in very different ways. Some countries are single-payer systems; in other countries, costs are paid by multiple (not-for-profit!) insurance companies, and employers and workers share the cost of insurance premiums. In some countries patients must pay a co-pay, in others they never see a bill. In some countries people have long waits for specialist care, in other countries they get in the same day. Despite the differences, there are some very important similarities. First and foremost, everybody in the country is covered and has access to health care. Everybody can see any doctor; none are “out-of-network.” By almost every population health measure from childhood mortality to life expectancy, these countries far surpass the United States. And they do so at a cost that is a fraction what the United States spends for health care.

The attitudes expressed by representatives of the various countries are revealing. In France, one doctor says, “It would be stupid to say that everybody is equal . . . But when we get sick–then, everybody is equal.” The founder of Germany’s system, Otto von Bismarck, called it “applied Christianity,” and said, “A rich society must care for the poor.” Japan has an individual mandate; everyone must sign up with a health insurance plan. As one Japanese doctor said, “It’s considered an element of personal responsibility, that you insure yourself against health care costs. And who can be against personal responsibility?” The report that helped launch Canada’s Medicare system reads, “Economic growth is not the sole aim of our society. The value of a human life must be decided without regard to . . . economic considerations. We must take into account the human and spiritual aspects involved.”

Reid reiterates several times that he believes that societies have a moral obligation to make health care universal. But in this country, there is another mindset, another ethic, that stands in opposition to that view: the view that at best government has no business getting involved in health care, and at worst that government is evil and must be prevented from extending its nefarious reach into health care. Adherents to this ethic often use the term “Socialized Medicine” in a pejorative sense to refer to any health care system that has more government involvement than their own. According to this ethic, the spectre of Socialized Medicine covers a multitude of sins, as in:

  • In our system millions of people don’t have access to health care. But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.
  • Untold numbers of people are afraid to leave jobs they dislike because of health insurance concerns. But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.
  • Despite paying way more than any other country for health care, our country has worse health outcomes. But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.
  • Many people can’t go see their doctors that they have seen for decades because they are suddenly not “in network.” But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.
  • Our for-profit health insurance companies have the highest administrative costs in the world, which is a large part of the reason we pay so much more for such lower quality. But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.
  • Thousands of people — uninsured and insured — face financial ruin every year because of medical costs. But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.
  • Thousands of people die each year in our country because of diseases that could have been treated had they had access to health care. But at least we don’t have Socialized Medicine.

If we really think Socialized Medicine is so evil, then we had best scrap that purest form of Socialized Medicine which is in our midst: the VA system. While we’re at it, we really ought to dismantle Medicare as well. But if we’re not willing to take those simple steps — if Socialized Medicine is after all not quite so evil in these instances — then we should be willing to debate different forms of financing health care on their own merits, and not merely dismiss any discussion with a nebulous term that we fondly imagine carries such moral weight that it lays to rest all other urgent ethical questions about our own system.

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