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12/04/2017

The DNR Tattoo

National media outlets have reported the fascinating account of the unconscious 70-year old brought into the Jackson Hospital (Miami) emergency room with a “Do Not Resuscitate” tattoo on his chest.

In correspondence to the New England Journal of Medicine, doctors involved in the case explain the process by which the medical team used to evaluate the case. At first, the team did not plan to honor the tattoo, but an ethics consultation “suggested that it was most reasonable to infer that the tattoo expressed an authentic preference . . . and that the law is sometimes not nimble enough to support patient-centered care and respect for patients’ best interests.” One wonders what facts were used to shed light on the accuracy of the tattoo, especially in view of another case, cited in the NEJM correspondence (“DNR tattoos: a cautionary tale”), when a DNR tattoo did not convey the wishes of the patient.

The accounts of this most recent case end on a positive note: “Subsequently, the social work department obtained a copy of his Florida Department of Health “out-of-hospital” DNR order, which was consistent with the tattoo . . . We were relieved to find his written DNR request…” I was happy to read this too, as tattoos are not necessarily the best way to communicate end of life issues.

Those who work with people thinking about advance directives know that what seems clear one day, could easily be less clear the next. Some patients change their mind on code status frequently, especially as they develop breathing problems and the like. It is, of course, their right to do so. Simply put, it would be hard to rescind (or even modify) a tattoo.

Those of us involved in chaplaincy speak of patients as being “living documents.” I am relatively sure this is not what is meant.

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