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02/06/2018

Citizenship, Surrogacy and the Power of ART

A recent LA Times article by Alene Tchekmedyian explores a complicated case involving birthright citizenship, surrogacy and same-sex marriage. Briefly, a California man, Andrew Banks, married an Israeli man, Elad Dvash, in 2010. At the time, same-sex marriage was not legal in the US leaving Elad unable to acquire a green card for residency (via the marriage) so the couple moved to Canada where Andrew has dual citizenship. While in Canada, the couple conceived twin boys, Aiden and Ethan, using assisted reproduction technology (ART) whereby eggs from an anonymous donor were fertilized by sperm from Elad and Andrew and then implanted within the womb of a female surrogate and carried to term. When the US Supreme Court struck down the federal law that denied benefits to legally married gay couples in 2013, Elad applied for and was granted his greed card. The present controversy occurred when Andrew and Elad applied for US passports for the twins. US State Department officials required detailed explanation of the boys’ conception, eventually requiring DNA tests which confirmed Aiden to be the biological son of Andrew and Ethan to be the biological son of Elad. Aiden was granted a US passport while Ethan was denied. The family has since traveled to the US (Elad with his green card and Ethan with his Canadian passport and temporary 6 month visa) where they are now suing the State Department for Ethan’s US birthright citizenship. They are arguing that the current applicable statute places them wrongly in the category of children born out of wedlock rather than recognizing their marriage, thus discriminating against them as a binational LGBTQ couple.

Birthright citizenship is a complicated legal arena and I am no lawyer. The US is even more complicated because we allow birthright citizenship to be conferred jus soli (right of the soil) in addition to jus sanguinis (right of blood). The twins were not born in the US so establishing “bloodline” is needed. The law specifies conditions where one parent is a US citizen and one is not a US citizen, and there is further differentiation depending on whether the children of the US citizen were born in or out of wedlock. They also vary depending on whether the US citizen is male or female, with the law more lenient (easier to acquire citizenship) for the child of a woman than of a man.

While the legal challenge here will almost certainly involve potential issues of discrimination of LGBTQ binational couples, the problem is really with the current legal definitions of parent as it relates to surrogacy in general. The State Department actually has a website dedicated answering questions related to foreign surrogacy and citizenship. The real issue is that the State Department relies upon genetic proof of parentage for foreign surrogacy births. In the present case, the surrogacy occurred outside the US, Elad is the genetic father of Ethan and Elad is not a US citizen; therefore Ethan is not a US citizen. While I’m deep in the weeds here, technically, Aiden and Ethan are not fraternal twins in the usual sense but rather half siblings (and this assumes that the donor eggs are from the same woman; otherwise the boys would be unrelated despite sharing the same pregnant womb through the magic of ART). Had Ethan been physically born via surrogacy in the US, he would have acquired his citizenship via jus soli (see US map for surrogacy friendly states near you).

This problem is just as confounding for heterosexual couples using foreign surrogates, and the problem is global. A more detailed technical legal discussion may be found here. A heterosexual couple using donor eggs and donor sperm and using a foreign third party surrogate would have exactly the same problem establishing US citizenship for “their” child. A similar problem would exist for an adopted embryo gestated in a foreign country by a foreign surrogate. If either the egg or the sperm of the US citizen is used for the surrogate birth, the child would be granted birthright citizenship.

The main difference for homosexual couples is that only one spouse can presently be the biological parent. I say “presently” because with ART it is theoretically possible (and may become actually possible in the future) to convert a human somatic cell into either a male sperm or a female egg. At that point, both spouses within a same-sex marriage could be the biological parents of their child. The present legal issue is not the result of a cultural prejudice against anyone’s sexuality but with the biological prejudice of sex itself. ART has the potential ability to blur the categories of sex as culture is now blurring the categories of gender. Should we consider this a good thing?

Given the present technological limits of ART, the simple issue of US citizenship could be resolved in all these cases if the US citizen parent simply adopted the child. Elad correctly points out that while adoption of Ethan by Andrew would grant Ethan US citizenship, it would not grant Ethan birthright citizenship, a necessary requirement for Ethan to someday run for US president. ART may be forcing us to look at changing our definition of parent but should it change our definition of biology? Ethan is the biological son of Elad. He is able to be the legally adopted son of Andrew and enjoy the benefits of US citizenship as currently does his half brother Aiden. He is not able to become the biological son of Andrew and enjoy the additional benefit of birthright citizenship via jus sanguinis.

Should we change the definition of birthright citizenship because ART is changing our definition of parent?

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