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02/20/2018

DIY CRISPR Kits – Gene Editing for the Rest of Us

One might think with the amazing advance of technology and easy access to nearly infinite data via the Internet that we, as a society, would see a reduction in false claims of benefit for novel medical procedures and untested medications. Sadly, it seems to be just the opposite. I seem to be spending gradually more time with my patients reviewing the results of their internet research for new solutions for their chronic back pain. Their efforts are laudable even though the “hoped for” benefits claimed in their researched solutions are woefully lacking. Unfortunately, often this exercise in reviewing the outside data takes valuable time away from the remainder of the office visit.

Reviewing false or confusing information is one thing but preventing patients from self-experimentation with untested medications or unproven treatments is another. Enter the biohacker and companies offering do-it-yourself (DIY) kits claiming to allow anyone to experiment with CRISPR (a method of genetic editing) for self-administration. Emily Mullin covers biohacking and DIY CRISPR very nicely in her recent article in the December Technology Review. To me, this has the feel of the 1980s when a curious kid with some basic programming knowledge, an inexpensive computer and a modem can access previously forbidden government systems, potentially unleashing havoc on the rest of us (WarGames, anyone?) After all, now that we know the human genetic code, all we need is for someone to just provide the instructions and tools for editing that code, then anyone could tweak their own DNA. Easy peasy lemon squeezy, right?

Recently, the FDA has been busy trying to prevent medical clinics from administering untested stem cell treatments (see Neil Skjoldal’s recent November blog entry on (Stem Cell Clinics & the FDA). Imagine the significant increase in the scope of the regulatory problem if individuals can order a DIY CRISPR kit off the Internet!

While we might chagrin at the naiveté required to believe the street-side pitch of the Old West Carter’s Little Liver Pill salesman, that same pitch via a modern tech savvy YouTube video (complete with separate internet links) somehow offers a new level of legitimacy. The Technology Review article speculated that one of the featured companies was preparing not a vaccine but a treatment for herpes. In less than 8 weeks from the article’s publication, Aaron Traywick, CEO of Ascendance Biomedical, publically self-injected himself with his firm’s untested and non-FDA approved “treatment” for herpes. The linked article by Reegan Von Wildenradt in the popular magazine Men’sHealth offered an excellent counter as to why this type of “science” might be suspect, including quotes from ethicist Arthur L. Caplan at NYU in support of the standard FDA process for screening medical treatments.

We often lament in this blog that technology is advancing so rapidly that we fail to have a fair public hearing and discussion of the ethics involved in a particular biomedical advance. Now it seems our time may be better spent speaking out first about the basic risks of the new technology and doing our best to support the FDA in their massive task of policing the Internet to prevent a DIY CRISPR kit from falling into the wrong hands – ours.

P.S. – I’m accepting names for the title of the future Hollywood blockbuster where the son of Matthew Broderick and Ally Sheedy injects himself with his own DIY CRISPR-modified DNA and …

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