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02/01/2018

Fertility with frozen eggs: not a sure thing

In case you didn’t see it, the Washington Post has this story about how more women are trying to improve their overall chances of having a baby—particularly in the later reproductive years of their 30’s and 40’s—but success is far from certain.  Human oocytes (eggs) are fragile things, and it was not until recent years that freezing techniques developed to a point that would allow the eggs to survive being frozen and, some time later, thawed (the “freeze-thaw” cycle).  Then, they would be fertilized in the lab, by in vitro fertilization, and implanted into the womb of the would-be mother.

As the article points out, women are born with their entire endowment of eggs, which become less likely to be successfully fertilized and develop into a healthy baby as they, and the woman, age.  Hence a woman’s inexorably declining fertility, particularly from their mid-30’s on.  Freezing eggs for later use is increasingly popular, if one can afford it, or if employers offer it as a perk, as some do, to their female employees.

It’s still expensive, and success appears to depend on the age of the woman (and eggs) at their harvest, and the number harvested and kept in frozen storage.  One must use the qualifier “appears,” because, as the article also points out, reliable statistics are not being kept.  The not-so-subtle implication is that the fertility “industry” wants to sell the process but would rather not know that the ultimate success rate could be as low as, or lower than, the 50-60% rate quoted by New York University.

Clear implications: better data and more transparency are to be desired, and there appear to be at least some remaining biologic limits, strong if not absolute, to reproductive freedom.  Beyond that, as I opined in May of 2013 (fairly bluntly, I do confess) are the radical implications for our concepts of parenthood and begetting children, and for turning said procreation into just plain old, quality-controlled, fully artificial creation.  Things haven’t gotten quite so absolute, yet.  But better quality control of egg freezing and the outcomes, if possible, would be a move in the direction of more artificial reproduction.

It’s a good article from the Post.  Too much to try to do justice to here.  Read the whole thing.

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