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11/21/2018

Thanksgiving and ethics

By Steve Phillips

It is good at times for us to stop and think about why we do the things that we do and what they mean. Tomorrow is Thanksgiving Day, a holiday that our society enthusiastically celebrates with lots of food, the gathering of families, and sporting events, followed by intense shopping. Historically Thanksgiving in America began with a group of Christians expressing their gratitude to God for what he had done for them. Christians continue to see this holiday as one during which we pause to remember what God has done for us and take time to express our thanks to him.

However, many in our society no longer believe in a personal God to whom gratitude is due. What does it mean to celebrate Thanksgiving if a person believes that those things that they are pleased to have are theirs due to a combination of chance and their own effort? Or if in our entitlement culture they believe that all that they have are things that they deserve. If that is the case, there is no reason for giving thanks and no one to whom thanks can be given. Instead of being a time of actually giving thanks to the one who has graciously given good gifts to us, the holiday has become a celebration of affluence and good fortune. Sporting events and shopping fit that very well.

How does this relate to ethics? The two different meanings of Thanksgiving correspond with two different ways of thinking about how we ought to live. For those of us who see Thanksgiving as a time to remember that the good things that we have come from God, it also reminds us that we are created beings who are made by and dependent on the God who has given us the things that we are thankful for. Remembering this helps us realize that God is the source of all that is good and that our understanding of what is right and how we ought to live comes from him as well. The alternative meaning of the Thanksgiving celebration is self-focused. If there is no God to be thankful to, the celebration is about the fulfillment of personal desires. That correlates with the ethics of moral individualism in which moral values are based on how a person feels and focused on fulfillment of personal desires.

Whether we see Thanksgiving Day is a time to actually give thanks to the God who is the giver of all good things or not makes a big difference in how we think about ethics.

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