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Posted on February 4, 2020 at 5:22 AM

A recent CBS news story provides yet another example of the technology and legal cart pulling the ethical horse.

In short, in 2014, an Arizona couple used in vitro fertilization (IVF) to preserve her eggs after she learned she had breast cancer and would require chemotherapy. The woman’s then boyfriend originally declined to be the sperm donor but later agreed when the woman, perhaps desperate to preserve her eggs, considered using a former boyfriend as the donor (fertilized eggs survive cryogenic preservation far better than unfertilized eggs). The couple executed a contractual agreement, provided by the clinic, as to the disposition of the frozen embryos (“their joint property”) should their relationship divorce or dissolve prior to implantation. They married several days later, underwent IVF yielding 7 embryos, which were cryogenically preserved and the woman underwent successful chemotherapy.

Unfortunately, after 2 years of marriage but prior to implantation, the husband filed for divorce. The pre-IVF contract stipulated that both husband and wife had to mutually agree on the disposition of the embryos – if not, they agreed a court could decide the embryos’ fate. Recently, the Arizona Supreme Court determined that the embryos should be put up for adoption, siding in one sense with the ex-husband to prevent the ex-wife from “using” the embryos. The decision upset many in Arizona to the point where the Arizona Legislature enacted a law to award the frozen embryos, in the future cases of divorce, to the spouse who “intends to use them to have a baby.” The new law will not benefit the ex-wife so, at the time of this blog entry, she was considering whether or not to appeal her case to the US Supreme Court.

There is a lot here to consider. I want to focus on just a few issues. First, I left scare quotes around several of the terms used in this case. The frozen embryos are indeed legally “joint property”, much like children in other cases of divorce. The couple could have just as easily checked the box on the contract to select “Destroy the Embryos” in case of their divorce. This same choice is one that many married (and unmarried) couples make regularly in IVF absent divorce when deciding the fate of unwanted or unused embryos following successful pregnancy and birth from prior IVF cycles. So asking a court to decide the fate of the frozen embryos is similar to children of divorced couples (though their “destruction” is not currently an option.)

“Using the embryos” is terminology that further emphasizes the commodification of frozen embryos as we consider them as a convenience for, or, for the sole benefit of, the parent(s). While I can empathize with the ex-wife’s desire to preserve her ability to have future children in the face of cancer treatment, her choice of an ambivalent (then) boyfriend over an ex-boyfriend as the father of her future children has proven disappointing, if not disastrous, for her in the present. It is harder for me to grasp the rationale of the ex-husband, who, though previously agreeing to father his ex-wife’s children, now (vindictively?) refuses to allow her to mother them, particularly since (continuing with my horse analogy) that fatherhood horse left the barn years ago.

As we allegedly advance our technical and scientific skills by increasing the various situations in which women can become pregnant, we are demanding more legal decisions when these new situations cause conflict rather than discussing and agreeing beforehand whether or not to permit these situations from occurring in the first place.

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