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Posted on June 10, 2020 at 12:38 PM

I have a friend who teaches public health. We share a common
faith and a common commitment to living out that faith. However, we have
different priorities. In medicine he focuses on the overall health of
populations, while I tend to focus more on the needs of individual people and
the relationship between the patient and a physician. His career has involved
researching the health needs of particular populations, many times in large
cities. My career has involved caring for individuals, mostly in small rural
communities. Much of his research has involved the health needs of the
African-American community. My medical practice has involved people in small
rural Midwestern communities where African-Americans make up a very small
percentage of the population.

Both of us believe that all human beings have been created
in the image of God and deserve our respect. When we talk about ethical issues
I tend to remind him that our understanding that all human beings have been
created in the image of God means that we need to stand up for the value of
human embryos and fetuses who are unable to stand up for themselves and for
those with disabilities and those who are dying who may be treated as having
less value than other human beings. He reminds me that we need to stand up for
those in the African-American community and other minorities who are made in
the image of God but suffer many injustices in our society.

Since I retired from practicing medicine my primary way of
standing up for the value of every human being is through teaching. I try to
help my students understand what it means that human beings have been created
in the image of God and how that impacts the moral issues that we face in
bioethics. My friend also teaches that to his students, but also expresses his
faith and values by living among and worshiping with his African-American
neighbors who have become his friends as well as those that he advocates for. He
has learned to incorporate what he believes into how he lives. That is what we
need in our society to move toward racial justice and reconciliation. The
understanding that every human being is created in the image of God needs to
become how we live.


Posted on

I have a friend who teaches public health. We share a common
faith and a common commitment to living out that faith. However, we have
different priorities. In medicine he focuses on the overall health of
populations, while I tend to focus more on the needs of individual people and
the relationship between the patient and a physician. His career has involved
researching the health needs of particular populations, many times in large
cities. My career has involved caring for individuals, mostly in small rural
communities. Much of his research has involved the health needs of the
African-American community. My medical practice has involved people in small
rural Midwestern communities where African-Americans make up a very small
percentage of the population.

Both of us believe that all human beings have been created
in the image of God and deserve our respect. When we talk about ethical issues
I tend to remind him that our understanding that all human beings have been
created in the image of God means that we need to stand up for the value of
human embryos and fetuses who are unable to stand up for themselves and for
those with disabilities and those who are dying who may be treated as having
less value than other human beings. He reminds me that we need to stand up for
those in the African-American community and other minorities who are made in
the image of God but suffer many injustices in our society.

Since I retired from practicing medicine my primary way of
standing up for the value of every human being is through teaching. I try to
help my students understand what it means that human beings have been created
in the image of God and how that impacts the moral issues that we face in
bioethics. My friend also teaches that to his students, but also expresses his
faith and values by living among and worshiping with his African-American
neighbors who have become his friends as well as those that he advocates for. He
has learned to incorporate what he believes into how he lives. That is what we
need in our society to move toward racial justice and reconciliation. The
understanding that every human being is created in the image of God needs to
become how we live.

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