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Author Archive: Blog Editor

06/22/2018

A Tribute to Professor H. Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., PhD., MD (1941-2018)

by Ana S. Iltis, PhD and Mark J. Cherry, PhD

Tristram Engelhardt, Jr., PhD, MD, one of the intellectual founders of the fields of bioethics and the philosophy of medicine, whose seminal work continues to frame debates about healthcare policy and medical practice, fell asleep in the Lord on June 21, 2018 in Houston, Texas.

He was Professor of History and Philosophy of Medicine at Rice University and Professor Emeritus at Baylor College of Medicine. He died of complications due to cancer. He was 77 years old.

Once described as the enfant terribleof bioethics, Professor Engelhardt challenged Western secular liberal moral and political assumptions which, he argued, could not be secured through reason alone, and frequently cause more harm than benefit.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, In Memoriam and tagged . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

06/04/2018

Outsider/Insider

This post also appears as an editorial in the June 2018 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

by Albert R. Jonsen

The editors of The American Journal of Bioethics chose well when they invited me to write a preface for this issue devoted to the Insider/Outsider problem in bioethics: I am the original and perpetual insider/outsider in the field. My entry into medical education, in 1972, was marked by an argument over my title: should I be designated Professor of Medical Ethics, as the Dean of University of California School of Medicine wished? A very senior faculty member objected, saying that the title was inappropriate since I did not do anything medical.…

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This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, Editorial-AJOB, Featured Posts. Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

06/04/2018

“Natural” Talents and Dedication—Meanings and Values in Sport

This post also appears as an editorial in the June 2018 issue of The American Journal of Bioethics.

by Thomas H. Murray, Ph.D.

“Good ethics begins with good facts” is a mantra I learned in my early years at The Hastings Center. The relevant facts include, of course, scientific and medical ones. But just as important are the forces that shape perceptions, motivations, and outcomes. The importance of understanding those factors—call them grounded realities—soon became clear in my first major research assignment: the ethics of performance enhancing drug use in sport.

The bioethics literature circa 1980 led me to expect to find athletes struggling against the unjustified paternalistic restraints of anti-doping zealots.…

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This entry was posted in Editorial-AJOB, Featured Posts, Justice, Sports Ethics. Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

05/14/2018

Ethical Considerations in the Manufacture, Sale and Distribution of Genome Editing Technologies

by Jeremy Sugarman MD MPH,MA, Supriya Shivakumar PhD, Martha Rook PhD, Jeanne F. Loring PhD, Christoph Rehmann-Sutter PhD, Jochen Taupitz PhD, Jutta Reinhard-Rupp PhD, Steven Hildemann MD PhD

New genome editing technologies are playing an increased role in an array of advanced research and development efforts in the life sciences. In tandem, there has been broad recognition of the need to address the ethical issues associated with the use of these genome editing tools. Although many uses of genome editing technologies do not raise novel ethical concerns, some have rightly attracted considerable attention, especially regarding the possibility of manipulating the human germline (Baltimore et al.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Genetics. Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

05/03/2018

Artist’s Blurb

by Katelyn Greenhill

When creating this cover for, “Responding to Those Who Hope for a Miracle” the goal was to communicate miracle and religious invocation within the healthcare setting. Most importantly, I was looking to create an illustration that dignified the concept. A miracle is, in essence, hope and hope can be clearly echoed through the act of prayer. The rosary depicted embodies this act and replaces the surgical instrument of this illustration just as many might replace invasive treatments for the hope of a miracle. I chose the surgical field as the setting and perspective for this piece placing the viewer into a dire and very active medical situation were lives are at stake and many often turn to the hope of miracles to aid in their medical decision-making process.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Media. Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

05/02/2018

What’s in a Name? The Ethical Importance of Respecting a Patient’s “Unexplained” Medical Concerns

This post is also published as an editorial in the May 2018 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics.

by Kayhan Parsi, PhD JD & Nanette Elster, PhD

In the first-year clinical skills course medical students take here at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine, one of the key aspects of the medical interview that students learn is the patient’s perspective of their illness. In addition to documenting the patient’s main concerns, history of present illness and past medical history (a curious redundancy), we stress with our students that they should always ask what the patient thinks is going on.…

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This entry was posted in Editorial-AJOB, Featured Posts, Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

04/08/2018

Building a Trustworthy Precision Health Research Enterprise

This editorial also appears in the April 2018 edition of the American Journal of Bioethics

by David Magnus, PhD and Jason N. Batten, MA

This issue of the American Journal of Bioethics features an article on the importance of building trusting relationships for the successful creation of research repositories that include biospecimens and data records from under-represented ethnic and racial groups in the U.S. Other researchers have made note of this challenge (including most of this research group in relation to learning health system research). This editorial will focus on two important points raised by Kraft et al. and discussed in the outstanding set of commentaries.…

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This entry was posted in Editorial-AJOB, Featured Posts, Informed Consent, Research Ethics and tagged , , . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

04/08/2018

Artist’s Blurb- April AJOB Cover

by Natalie Yoshioka, BA
I spent the most time trying to find an exciting visual metaphor that would best represent the recommendation of building trust within a community over an extended period of time. I didn’t want to rely on solutions that were too obvious or simplistic to describe the article themes. Precision medicine is often a big data problem, where researchers are trying to find a solution within a depth of patient data and information. This drew me to the idea of a researcher trying to find a fish within a whirlpool, which loosely represents large amounts of genetic or patient medical information.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Media, Research Ethics and tagged . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

03/18/2018

From Frankenstein to Hawking: Which is the Real Face of Science?

by Jonathan D. Moreno, Ph.D.

If Stephen Hawking knew that he was facing his last days he would surely have been amused that his death would come on Albert Einstein’s birthday and almost exactly two hundred years after the publication of Mary Shelley’s Frankenstein. As a matter of character and reputation the imaginary Victor and the richly real Stephen couldn’t have been more different, but together they represent our Janus-Headed modern view of science and scientists.

Hawking was the bright, shining face of creative genius and human intellectual flourishing, gifted with both an immense imagination and a startling, vulnerable humanity.  He was no less an explorer than Christopher Columbus or John Glenn, but his exploration came in the most human way possible, through his mind rather than mere physical mobility. …

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, In Memoriam and tagged , . Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.

02/22/2018

Artist’s Note-March 2018

Original art and artist’s blurbs are presented in collaboration with the students of the University of Illinois Chicago program in Biomedical Visualization. 
by Eleanor Milman
When I learned that I would be creating an illustration on pediatric medical decision making, I immediately wanted to work from the perspective of a child. Grappling with heavy topics such as informed consent and patient autonomy is difficult for adults and so must be especially daunting for children and their parents.

It was important that the illustration include elements from both the childlike world of imagination and wonder, and the less innocent world of medical decision making.

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Informed Consent, Media, Pediatrics. Posted by Blog Editor. Bookmark the permalink.