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Author Archive: Craig Klugman

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10/26/2018

BioethicsTV (October 22-26): #TheResident, #NewAmsterdam, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 5): Buying Thought Leaders and Handsy Docs; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 5): Gun shootings; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 5): Genetic secrets and duty to inform

Resident (Season 2; Episode 5): Buying Thought Leaders and Handsy Docs

Bell negotiates a deal with a new start-up medical device company: For a substantial discount, he will make the company the sole source of medical devices at the hospital. The device company ultimately offers Bell $200,000 in consulting fees and an ownership stake.…

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This entry was posted in BioethicsTV, Conflict of Interest, Featured Posts, Genetics, Pharmaceuticals, Privacy and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

10/22/2018

BioethicsTV (October 15-18) #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #NewAmsterdam, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 4): Medical Lawsuits; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 4): Inappropriate coercion to remove autonomy; Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 4): Conflicts of interest; Giving bad news; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4: Episode 4): When medicine and immigration collide; tough choices


The Resident (Season 2; Episode 4): Medical Lawsuits

This episode is less about particular stories than the about the topic of malpractice lawsuits. The episode jumps between a deposition and the events that led up to it The main point occurs about 15 minutes in when Hawkins, Pravesh, Nevin and Feldman are having coffee in the cafeteria as they watch an attorney go from table-to-table, asking patients about their care.…

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10/16/2018

“Are you lonesome tonight”: A Bioethics Perspective on a New Public Health Epidemic

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Ben Sasse, Senator (R-NB) and professor of history, writes in his new book Them: Why We Hate Each Other—and How to Healthat in a world that is more interconnected through screens, we are more separate and alone than ever: “We’re literally dying of despair” he states. To prove his thesis, Sasse points to decreases in people entertaining at home, to the loss of must-see TV shows that everyone watched at the same time, to a changing workplace that has altered our sense of identity and how we relate (think telecommuting, working through computers instead of people), to the opioid epidemic (he says the last time we had radical work transformation that increased loneliness there were high rates of alcoholism), to the number of births outside of marriage, to the trend toward automatization of up to 50% of jobs, and to studies that show loneliness reduces lifespan.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Philosophy & Ethics and tagged , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

10/12/2018

BioethicsTV (October 8-12, 2018): #TheResident #TheGoodDoctor #ChicagoMed #GreysAnatomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“Exploring ethical issues in TV medical dramas”

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 3): Saline shortage, pressure to bill; Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 3): Structural discrimination against women; surrogate decision-making; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 3): Best interest of a child; faith versus science; Jump to Grey’s Anatomy (Season 15; Episode 4): Fraud, assault, lies, and the ethics police

Medical dramas this week seemed to focus on two themes: 1. The poor treatment of female physicians and 2. Doctors committing fraud to manipulate patients and insurance companies into doing what they want.…

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10/09/2018

A Little Dab Will Do Ya: Fact and Fiction of the Radiation Debate

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

My father tells the story of how when he was a child, shoe stores had boxes into which you could slide your feet, shod in potential new shoes. This “shoe fitting fluoroscope” would display a x-ray of your feet so that you could see how well your shoes fit. In the 1950s, there were 10,000 of these devices in use throughout the United States. Perhaps even worse, store clerks would put their hands in the devices to squeeze the shoes to check for fit.

Even back then, the recommendation was that children not use these devices more than 12 times per year to limit radiation exposure.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Health Policy & Insurance, Health Regulation & Law, Science and tagged , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

10/05/2018

BioethicsTV (October 1-5)

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 2): Rising drug costs Jump to New Amsterdam (Season 1; Episode 2): Cultural accommodation; medicating schoolkids Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 2): Withholding support; withdrawing support

The Resident (Season 2; Episode 2): Rising drug costs

In its sophomore year, this show seems to be shying away from ethical issues and the gross incompetence of its fictional hospital and exchanging it for hope; hope that hospitals can cover their costs and meet patient needs.

One storyline begins with a nurse saying, “Because you’re a minor, we have to wait on your mom” to a teenage patient in the ED.…

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09/28/2018

BioethicsTV: (September 23-28): #TheResident, #NewAmsterdam, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Jump to New Amsterdam (Seasons 1; Episode 1): Infectious disease; mistaken diagnosis; Jump to The Resident (Season 2; Episode 1): Emergency preparedness, risky surgery, and dehumanizing technology; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 1): Deaf culture

This week is the beginning of the new television season and the popularity of the medical drama is evident as a total of 5 prime time dramas hit the airwaves (The Resident, The Good Doctor, New Amsterdam, Chicago Med, and Grey’s Anatomy). In the first week of the season, however, many of these shows seemed to avoid ethical dilemmas, taking a turn toward the personal relationships of the main characters rather than difficult choices.…

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This entry was posted in BioethicsTV, Featured Posts and tagged , , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

09/27/2018

Investigative Genealogy: Guilty by Familial Association

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

This week I was on a panel discussing the topic of genealogical searchingrunning a DNA sample found at a crime scene against criminal, public and commercial DNA databases with the goal of not finding a suspect, but to find a relative of the suspect. This familial searchinvolves the National DNA Index System (NDIS) and investigative genealogy, which is looking in commercial (e.g. 23andMe, Ancestry) and public (GEDMatch) DNA databases for a familial match. The latter is what was done in the Golden State Killercase.

In most states, when a person is convicted of a crime, their DNA is uploaded to NDIS, which currently has nearly 18 million records.…

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09/21/2018

When Morality Isn’t So Moral: Price Gouging in Big Pharma

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

“I think it is a moral requirement to make money when you can…to sell the product for the highest price” Nirmal Mulyeto the Financial Times

I have been haunted by the above quote, first reported in the Financial Times on September 11. Mulye, CEO of Nostrom Laboratories, raised the price of an old (1953), formerly inexpensive, antibiotic by 404 percent to nearly $2,400 per bottle (from about $475). Mulye explains his rationale at first by saying that the drug’s only competitor raised their price to $2,800, so his move is really a bargain. He also claims that he has a duty to his stockholders to give them a return for their investment, thus the need to raise the fees.…

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This entry was posted in Ethics, Featured Posts, Philosophy & Ethics and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

09/13/2018

The Efficient Life is Worth Living

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I have been thinking a lot about the idea of efficiency lately. About 6 years ago, I was listening Andrew Tarvin, an improv comedy colleague of mine—now professional “Humor Engineer: give a TED-like talk on the notion of “efficiency” as a driver in his life. At the time I thought, “Yes, I resemble that idea.” When people ask me (as they often do), “How do you accomplish everything you do” I always jokingly reply, “I do not sleep much and I don’t have kids.” While those are true statements, the real reason is that I have tried to cultivate an efficient life.…

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