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Author Archive: D. Joy Riley

About D. Joy Riley

04/16/2017

Greetings and celebrations

and why there is no bioethics posting today . . . My Muslim friends recently celebrated the Persian New Year with many symbols of spring. My Jewish friends are in the midst of Passover celebration. Today, Christians celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus ...

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04/02/2017

Surrogacy in the Market of Desire

The State of Florida has spilled no small quantity of ink outlining the legal confines of gestational surrogacy (see particularly sections 742.13-742.17, here).  Legally permitted gestational surrogacy in Florida does not include “bringing in and harboring aliens, sex trafficking of children, forced labor and furthering slave traffic,” however; these charges were leveled against Esthela Clark in 2015. Clark had held a Mexican woman in her... // Read More »

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03/19/2017

The Semantics of Therapy, Part II

A previous blog post of “The Semantics of Therapy” posed three questions about the human genome being a “patient” to be treated. One reader found the post “provocative and disturbing” and called for further explanation and discussion of the questions posed. That will take some time and several postings. The first of the questions to be considered is this: If the “patient” is a genome, to whom... // Read More »

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03/19/2017

The Semantics of Therapy, Part II

A previous blog post of “The Semantics of Therapy” posed three questions about the human genome being a “patient” to be treated. One reader found the post “provocative and disturbing” and called for further explanation and discussion of the questions posed. That will take some time and several postings. The first of the questions to be considered is this: If the “patient” is a genome, to whom... // Read More »

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02/19/2017

A Conflict of Interest is NOT an Ambiguity

Oregon Senate Bill 494 has been described as a “euthanasia bill” that is “intentionally ambiguous,” and as a piece of legislation that would “allow the starving and dehydrating of patients who suffer from dementia or mental illness.” What has received less press is the composition of the 13-member committee who would be perpetually in charge of advance directive forms in the state, with no oversight by... // Read More »

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02/05/2017

Excuse Me, Doctor, What Exactly Do You Profess?

The late Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., revered medical educator, ethicist, and physician, often made the point that a professional professes something. Merriam-Webster  confirms that the etymology of the word, profession, includes the Latin for “public declaration.” The Hippocratic Oath, probably penned by members of the Pythagorean sect, according to Ludwig Edelstein (see Ancient Medicine: Selected Papers of Ludwig Edelstein. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987), has for... // Read More »

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01/22/2017

The Semantics of Therapy

What is therapy? This is one question that should occur to the reader of Jill Neimark’s “Unexpected Risks Found In Replacing DNA To Prevent Inherited Disorders.” In referring to the birth of the baby born of three parents last year, the author names it “mitochondrial replacement therapy”: Using a technique called mitochondrial replacement therapy, the researchers combined DNA from two women and one man to bypass... // Read More »

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