Get Published | Subscribe | About | Write for Our Blog    

Author Archive: D. Joy Riley

About D. Joy Riley

09/07/2019 Whose Body?
In 1923, Dorothy L. Sayers published her first mystery featuring Lord Peter Wimsey, entitled Whose Body?  The concern was that an adult body, wearing only a pince-nez, had been found in someone’s bathtub. Whose body was this? Was it the body of a well-known financier, who had recently disappeared? Or was it the body of …

Continue reading "Whose Body?"

Full Article

The National Institutes of Health (NIH) released on 26 July “Changes to NIH Requirements Regarding Proposed Human Fetal Tissue Research.”  A new bullet point is required for “Human Fetal Tissue Research Approach.”   The applicant for funds is obliged to justify the use of human fetal tissue (HFT) in proposed research: Why the research goals cannot …

Continue reading "Decrying Human Fetal Tissue Research Justification"

Full Article

Developmental biologist Lewis Wolpert is credited with saying, “It is not birth, marriage, or death, but gastrulation which is truly the most important time in your life.” Gastrulation, simply put, means the embryo develops an axis and distinctly different cell layers. In the human embryo, gastrulation takes place during the third week post-fertilization. Formation of …

Continue reading "Embryonic Legerdemain?"

Full Article

The Editorial Board of The Washington Post (WaPo) recently published their opinion  on regulation of heritable genetic changes in human eggs, sperm, and embryos. The authors expressed some measure of relief that organizations such as the National Academies in the U.S., the Royal Society in Britain, and the World Health Organization are beginning to consider …

Continue reading "Proposed moratorium on human germline: Asilomar analogue?"

Full Article

The World Medical Association (WMA) is cogitating on physician-assisted suicide. Their current statement, adopted in 1992, “editorially revised” in 2005, and reaffirmed in 2015, is as follows: Physician-assisted suicide, like euthanasia, is unethical and must be condemned by the medical profession. Where the assistance of the physician is intentionally and deliberately directed at enabling an …

Continue reading "Physician-assisted suicide, euthanasia, and the World Medical Association"

Full Article

The newsfeeds have been abuzz this week about premature lambs gestated in part in biobags by researchers at The Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. See “An extra-uterine system to physiologically support the extreme premature lamb” here.  The lamb has provided a model for much of our understanding of fetal and neonatal development in humans (see articles here and here for examples).  Therefore, the news of a... // Read More »

Full Article

and why there is no bioethics posting today . . . My Muslim friends recently celebrated the Persian New Year with many symbols of spring. My Jewish friends are in the midst of Passover celebration. Today, Christians celebrate the Resurrection of Jesus ...

Full Article

The State of Florida has spilled no small quantity of ink outlining the legal confines of gestational surrogacy (see particularly sections 742.13-742.17, here).  Legally permitted gestational surrogacy in Florida does not include “bringing in and harboring aliens, sex trafficking of children, forced labor and furthering slave traffic,” however; these charges were leveled against Esthela Clark in 2015. Clark had held a Mexican woman in her... // Read More »

Full Article

A previous blog post of “The Semantics of Therapy” posed three questions about the human genome being a “patient” to be treated. One reader found the post “provocative and disturbing” and called for further explanation and discussion of the questions posed. That will take some time and several postings. The first of the questions to be considered is this: If the “patient” is a genome, to whom... // Read More »

Full Article

A previous blog post of “The Semantics of Therapy” posed three questions about the human genome being a “patient” to be treated. One reader found the post “provocative and disturbing” and called for further explanation and discussion of the questions posed. That will take some time and several postings. The first of the questions to be considered is this: If the “patient” is a genome, to whom... // Read More »

Full Article