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Author Archive: Ethics and Society

About Ethics and Society

09/05/2018

Genomics, Big Data, and Broad Consent: a New Ethics Frontier for Prevention Science

In a new article published in Prevention Science, Dr. Celia Fisher, Director of Fordham University’s Center for Ethics Education and Deborah Layman, PhD Candidate of Fordham University’s Applied Developmental Psychology program, discuss the genomic revolution and emergence of big data to understanding the ethical implications for prevention scientists. Additionally, Fisher and Layman write about the uncertainty […]

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08/31/2018

On Protecting the Agency of Undocumented Immigrants from Patterns of Our Past

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE HONORABLE MENTION By Elizabeth Doty In the history of the United States rhetoric alienating immigrants, documented and undocumented, has consistently pervaded everyday life across the nation, from the front page of The New York Times to college campuses to airports to Congressional hearings to, indeed, even research. While I […]

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08/28/2018

Fear of Practitioner Bias and Confidentiality Breaches are Barriers to HIV Prevention among Transgender Youth, Study Finds

Celia B. Fisher, PhD, Director of Fordham University’s Center of Ethics and Education, explores transgender youth healthcare and HIV prevention in a recently published article titled:  Perceived Barriers to HIV Prevention Services for Transgender Youth. The article, published in the journal LGBT Health, examines the perceptions that transgender youth have of primary care providers, specifically […]

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08/28/2018

Fear of Practitioner Bias and Confidentiality Breaches are Barriers to HIV Prevention among Transgender Youth, Study Finds

Celia B. Fisher, PhD, Director of Fordham University’s Center of Ethics and Education, explores transgender youth healthcare and HIV prevention in a recently published article titled:  Perceived Barriers to HIV Prevention Services for Transgender Youth. The article, published in the journal LGBT Health, examines the perceptions that transgender youth have of primary care providers, specifically […]

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08/24/2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – August 24, 2018

Bioethics/Medical Ethics Jahi McMath, Teen At Center Of Medical And Religious Debate On Brain Death, Has Died Jahi McMath, a brain-dead patient who had been on life support since 2013, died on June 22, 2018 because of liver failure. McMath’s situation sparked a debate over whether brain-dead patients are considered physically dead. Though McMath is […]

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08/07/2018

The Clinical Dialectic: What Makes Life Worth Living?

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE THIRD-PLACE WINNER By Brett Taylor Can too much of a good thing become bad? During the spring semester of my junior year, I had overexerted myself while working out. In doing so, I destroyed my muscles to the point that their constituent proteins were coursing through my bloodstream and […]

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06/26/2018

Welcome to the 2018 HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute Fellows!

The Fordham University HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI) is pleased to announce that the following individuals have been selected as 2018 Fellows: The Fordham University  HIV and Drug Abuse Prevention Research Ethics Training Institute (RETI), now in its 8th year, is a training grant sponsored by the National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA) (R25 DA031608-08), Principal Investigator, […]

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06/11/2018

A Doctor’s Beauty

STUDENT VOICES | CHYNN ETHICS PRIZE SECOND-PLACE WINNER By Carli Grace My mother is a “beautician”, the suffix -ician denoting a person skilled in the prefix, beauty, or more simply a hairdresser. Growing up my kitchen always smelled of ammonia and hair bleach, and my kitchen sink was used as a makeshift shampoo bowl. My […]

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06/06/2018

The Trumpification of Research Ethics: It’s Now OK to Use Prisoners as Guinea Pigs

By Celia Fisher, PhD Fordham University Federal regulations prohibiting scientists from using prisoners to study health problems not directly related to the causes and conditions of their incarceration are now threatened by the same morally ambiguous forces undermining other U.S. regulations designed to protect the public.  As reported in The New York Times, to resolve scientific […]

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06/06/2018

The Trumpification of Research Ethics: It’s Now OK to Use Prisoners as Guinea Pigs

By Celia Fisher, PhD Fordham University Federal regulations prohibiting scientists from using prisoners to study health problems not directly related to the causes and conditions of their incarceration are now threatened by the same morally ambiguous forces undermining other U.S. regulations designed to protect the public.  As reported in The New York Times, to resolve scientific […]

Full Article