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Author Archive: Jenji Learn

07/27/2018

Fix Your Hearts, Not Their Parts

by Jenji Learn, MA

“Fix your hearts not our parts!”

”Autonomy, not surgery, my body belongs to ME!”

“Children have rights!”

Those were the pleas of the large gathering of Intersex people that assembled outside of Lurie Children’s Hospital in Chicago last Thursday, along with their families, friends, supporters, and Transex/Transgender allies, to voice their one, simple demand: “Stop mutilating us. End the genital mutilation of Intersex infants.”

Photo by Jenji Learn

Lurie Children’s Hospital (Chicago) is one of the many hospitals in America in which, when a child is born with mixed genitalia or has other pronounced mixtures of male and female morphology or genetics, doctors routinely perform unnecessary genitoplasty procedures on these infants, who often grow up suffering from physical and emotional harm as a result.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Informed Consent, Pediatrics and tagged . Posted by Jenji Learn. Bookmark the permalink.

01/17/2017

Fallout: From Healthcare Equality to Existential Threat

by Jenji Cassandra Learn

This New Year’s Day—Sunday the 1st, 2017—was supposed to be the first day that I and people like me had equal access to healthcare in America. It was supposed to the first time we were regarded as equal to our fellow citizens and not required to pay out-of-pocket for basic healthcare needs, or even surgery, without any help from insurance providers that the rest of America depends on and that we are never the less obliged to give our money to even while they regard us as non-entities and less-than. After decades of struggle and misery, all of that was finally about to change.…

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01/11/2017

The Cost of Being Whole: Double-Standards and Discrimination in Trans Healthcare

by Jenji C. Learn, BA

How much are your genitals worth to you? Your beard? Your breasts?

What’s a reasonable price for them? It’s not like you really need them, right?  They aren’t essential organs. They’re purely cosmetic- superficial!

If an accident or a malicious act cost you one of those things, you certainly wouldn’t expect your health insurance to cover it, or expect anyone to feel any sympathy for you. Why should they? That’s your responsibility, and you should pay out of pocket, because after all, you can live just as well without any of that stuff, surely.

If you found what I just said to be shocking, grotesque, callous, offensive, or positively inhuman… then so too must you apply those same words to describe the status of healthcare for trans and intersex people in America.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Health Policy & Insurance, Justice, professional ethics and tagged , , . Posted by Jenji Learn. Bookmark the permalink.