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Author Archive: Joe Gibes

About Joe Gibes

07/21/2017

Ethical Health Care Reform

Recently I heard a Christian TV personality refer to Obamacare as “iniquitous.” This started me thinking, What would make a health care funding reform scheme “iniquitous”? Or, although the words aren’t synonymous, what would make such a scheme unethical? What should go into ethical health care reform? The answers to these questions are legion and conflicting. There are some who see government intervention as inherently... // Read More »

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06/09/2017

Health care disparities: a pro-life issue

This month’s Health Affairs carries an article examining the correlation between one’s income and one’s perceptions about one’s own health and health care. Worldwide, those with the lowest incomes feel that their health is worse than those with the highest incomes do. They also are more likely than those with higher incomes to skip necessary treatment because they can’t afford it, and are more concerned that if... // Read More »

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05/12/2017

Undermining the USPSTF: The most important stakeholders are the patients

A strange “health care” drama plays out daily in our clinics and hospitals. A healthy person has a medical test done (even though he or she is healthy): a blood test, a chest x-ray or mammogram, maybe an ultrasound of some body part. The test comes back abnormal. The patient (for she has now gone from being a healthy person to being a patient) is... // Read More »

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04/21/2017

How to make Nazi doctors

Most people who go into medicine have as at least part of their motivation the desire to help other people. I’m sure this was as true in 1930’s Germany as anywhere else. So how did a cadre of Nazi doctors come not only to commit crimes against humanity, but also to defend the moral correctness of their conduct when placed on trial for those crimes?... // Read More »

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03/24/2017

A “disabled” person speaks out against a particular form of discrimination

Amidst lots of dark and tragic stories, a bright ray on the BBC website this week: Kathleen Humberstone, a 17 year-old English girl with Down syndrome, addressed the UN in Geneva to mark World Down Syndrome Day. Rather than reading anything I have to say, a far better use of your time would be to read what Ms. Humberstone said. You can find the full text here; if you scroll down... // Read More »

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03/11/2017

But at least we don’t have socialized medicine

I just read T. R. Teid’s 2009 book The Healing of America. It’s a timely read in light of the bar brawl over health care that’s brewing in the U.S. legislature this week. Of particular interest are his snapshots of the health care systems of the UK, France, Germany, Japan, Taiwan, Canada, and Switzerland, systems about which I held many cherished misconceptions. All of these countries... // Read More »

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02/18/2017

Advance Care Planning and its Detractors

The default mode of our technologically advanced medicine is to use our technology. Nowhere is this more true than close to the end of life. And our technology is really impressive; with it, we can keep chests going up and down and hearts beating for a long, long time. The troubling thing is that there are many people who would rather not have lots of... // Read More »

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02/10/2017

Apologies and Outcomes

What if a study shows that the course of action we know to be right doesn’t “work”? Or that it may even place us at a disadvantage? When bad things happen to patients in the course of medical treatment, doctors traditionally have avoided apologizing or even expressing sympathy to patients, for fear that such expressions would be used against them in malpractice court as an... // Read More »

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01/27/2017

Today

Today is a particularly significant day, and not just because it is the 261st birthday of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Today was the March for Life in Washington. “Life is winning again in America,” Vice President Mike Pence said to the gathered crowds. Today President Trump signed his “extreme vetting” executive order which, among other things, bans Syrian refugees until further notice, and caps refugees entering... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Joe Gibes. Bookmark the permalink.

01/27/2017

Today

Today is a particularly significant day, and not just because it is the 261st birthday of Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart. Today was the March for Life in Washington. “Life is winning again in America,” Vice President Mike Pence said to the gathered crowds. Today President Trump signed his “extreme vetting” executive order which, among other things, bans Syrian refugees until further notice, and caps refugees entering... // Read More »

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Joe Gibes. Bookmark the permalink.