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Author Archive: Joe Gibes

About Joe Gibes

01/13/2018

Eugenic immigration policies revisited

Many people, when they think of the history of eugenics, think of Nazi Germany. However, eugenics was widely accepted and implemented as policy in America long before the Nazis rose to power. At the beginning of the 20th century, the numbers of immigrants to the United States were increasing rapidly. This greatly alarmed those who were aligned with the eugenics movement, the quasi-scientific movement to preserve... // Read More »

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12/23/2017

From Coercion to Christmas

The recent wave of stories of sexual abuse and harassment led my residents (I teach family medicine residents) and me to a discussion of sexual ethical violations in medicine. The annals of disciplinary actions by state medical boards are filled with penalties inflicted upon physicians who have entered into sexual relationships with patients. Why is it that in the patient-physician relationship, sexual intimacy between two... // Read More »

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12/23/2017

From Coercion to Christmas

The recent wave of stories of sexual abuse and harassment led my residents (I teach family medicine residents) and me to a discussion of sexual ethical violations in medicine. The annals of disciplinary actions by state medical boards are filled with penalties inflicted upon physicians who have entered into sexual relationships with patients. Why is it that in the patient-physician relationship, sexual intimacy between two... // Read More »

Full Article

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12/09/2017

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD... // Read More »

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12/09/2017

Racial inequalities in cancer survival

Three studies published in a supplemental issue of the journal Cancer this month come to disturbing conclusions: in the United States, the survival rates for colon, breast, and ovarian cancer are lower for black people than for white people. The news isn’t all bad: overall cancer survival rates are going up. The three studies mentioned here draw from two larger studies of worldwide cancer survival, the CONCORD... // Read More »

Full Article

09/16/2017

The unbefriended and their doctors

There is a rapidly growing class of uniquely vulnerable patients showing up on our hospital doorsteps. Referred to as the unbefriended, or more prosaically as the unrepresented, these are patients who have no capacity to make medical decisions themselves, have no advance directives, and have no family or friends or anybody else on the face of the earth to speak for them. It is as... // Read More »

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09/02/2017

Reflections on visiting the site of a concentration camp

My 18-year old daughter has gone to spend a year in Germany as an exchange student. She is part of a group of students spending a month in intensive language training before going to live with their host families. This week, the students visited the site of the Mittelbau-Dora concentration camp. My daughter describes the camp and her experience in detail on her blog; below is... // Read More »

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07/21/2017

Ethical Health Care Reform

Recently I heard a Christian TV personality refer to Obamacare as “iniquitous.” This started me thinking, What would make a health care funding reform scheme “iniquitous”? Or, although the words aren’t synonymous, what would make such a scheme unethical? What should go into ethical health care reform? The answers to these questions are legion and conflicting. There are some who see government intervention as inherently... // Read More »

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06/09/2017

Health care disparities: a pro-life issue

This month’s Health Affairs carries an article examining the correlation between one’s income and one’s perceptions about one’s own health and health care. Worldwide, those with the lowest incomes feel that their health is worse than those with the highest incomes do. They also are more likely than those with higher incomes to skip necessary treatment because they can’t afford it, and are more concerned that if... // Read More »

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05/12/2017

Undermining the USPSTF: The most important stakeholders are the patients

A strange “health care” drama plays out daily in our clinics and hospitals. A healthy person has a medical test done (even though he or she is healthy): a blood test, a chest x-ray or mammogram, maybe an ultrasound of some body part. The test comes back abnormal. The patient (for she has now gone from being a healthy person to being a patient) is... // Read More »

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