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Author Archive: Jon Holmlund

About Jon Holmlund

10/13/2017

Two cases of genetics ethics issues

There is an ongoing NIH-sponsored database effort called the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) project the goal of which is to collect data on genetics–not just DNA gene sequences, but also gene activity, looking at “expression,” which is reflected in the RNA that is transcribed from genes–in a wide range of human tissues.  The tissues are obtained from deceased voluntary organ donors.  The ethical issues are not... // Read More »

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10/06/2017

Human gene editing marches on

Nature has recently carried two new reports of human gene editing.  In one, embryos donated from an IVF clinic had a gene critical to very early development altered, to study what happens when you do that, and try to understand early human development more than we now do.  In the other, scientists studied editing of an abnormal recessive gene, specifically the one causing a type... // Read More »

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09/07/2017

A Modest Proposal

FDA should regulate digital games, and potentially other apps, as medical devices. Why, pray tell? One doesn’t have to look very hard to find a growing belief (recognition?) that video games are addicting.  CBS has been on the story since at least 2007.  In 2014, “60 minutes” suggested that a violent video game could prompt murder.  Well, they posed it as a question, but to... // Read More »

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09/01/2017

Questioning whether genes in human embryos were in fact successfully edited

Nature reports that the editing of a gene in human embryos–reported earlier in August and discussed recently on this blog–has been questioned by a different group of scientists. Read a fuller, general-public-level description here. The questioning scientists doubt a specific claim of the initial work; namely, that a faulty gene in human sperm was edited through a corresponding gene in the human egg fertilized by... // Read More »

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08/25/2017

Fetal tissue and commerce

You may have seen in the general press that Indiana University is asking a federal judge to declare unconstitutional that state’s law banning research on the remains of aborted fetuses.  I noticed an article in the Wall Street Journal (subscription required).  An open-access account can be found here. I oppose abortion, but I can imagine for the sake of argument that, if one allows for... // Read More »

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08/25/2017

Fetal tissue and commerce

You may have seen in the general press that Indiana University is asking a federal judge to declare unconstitutional that state’s law banning research on the remains of aborted fetuses.  I noticed an article in the Wall Street Journal (subscription required).  An open-access account can be found here. I oppose abortion, but I can imagine for the sake of argument that, if one allows for... // Read More »

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08/17/2017

Search and destroy—or at least, select

This week’s issue of Nature carries a feature article on the explosion of preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) in China.  Because women are having children later in life, partly because of relaxation of the old one-child policy; because Chinese culture sees it as a duty to seek to bear healthy children; because some Chinese want to try to enable their kids to exploit some features of... // Read More »

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07/28/2017

Human genetic editing (engineering) is here

A “hat tip” again to Wesley Smith, who at the National Review Online blog, provided a link to this week’s report in the MIT Technology Review that the first editing of genes in human embryos in the US is underway—and apparently not yet formally published—at an academic center in Portland, Oregon.  Similar efforts have been undertaken in China, but US scientists have been a little... // Read More »

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07/20/2017

More about Charlie Gard

Dr. Robert Truog, the bioethicist and transplant physician who has pushed the envelope on the definition of death, has weighed in on the Charlie Gard case in a “Perspectives” piece that is generally available (i.e., without a subscription) from the Journal of the American Medical Association (JAMA).   By all means read it. Dr. Truog approaches the case from the standpoint of limiting medical research—indeed, that’s... // Read More »

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07/06/2017

Charlie Gard, the New England Journal of Medicine, and the Limits of “Conscience”

I would venture that most bioethicists would agree it would be ethically permissible to remove life support and active care from little Charlie Gard, and let him die.   The hospital in Britain where he has been receiving his care wants to do that, and the courts agree.  But why do they insist on this action when his parents want to transfer him for another try... // Read More »

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