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Author Archive: reflectivemeded

About reflectivemeded

03/21/2017

From My Students Most of All

By Zev Leifer The Talmud (Taanis 7a) quotes Rabbi Chanina who declared that, “I have learned much from my teachers, more from my colleagues and most from students.”  There is a tendency amongst educators, in general and more so, I suspect, amongst medical educators (given their many years of training and vast experience) to take […]

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03/14/2017

What’s a Nice Nurse like You doing in a Medical School?

Hearing the Call:  A Feature on How Physicians and Medical Educators Came to Understand their Vocation By Anne Gill Back in the 70’s, I called a surgeon to tell him his patient was bleeding from a cholecystectomy incision.  “When did you go to medical school?” he screamed.  “Until I say differently, that is serosanguineous fluid!” […]

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03/07/2017

“Seeing” the Doctor: Depicting the Physician’s Self-Identity

By Stacey McClintick What do you what to be when you grow up?  Do I even have to?  Can I cry now?  Can I show who I am?  I can only hope you will understand and be able to take away from me all that I have… because that is what I want to give. […]

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02/28/2017

Tough Love for Your Personal Statement: Advice from a Medical School Dean

By Sunny Nakae The Stritch School of Medicine received 11,355 applications for 160 seats for the 2017-2018 season.  Thousands of applicants have the required coursework, strong grades and test scores.  The word is out that students need volunteer work, clinical exposure, leadership, and research in order to be competitive.  Every applicant submits a primary personal […]

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02/21/2017

The Aftergift

“… and maybe then you’ll hear the words I’ve been singing; Funny, when you’re dead how people start listen’n…” If I Die Young (2010) by The Band Perry It was in the fall of 2015 that I received a call from a Mrs. Jones.  She went on to detail how her husband, Robert, had died […]

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02/14/2017

After the Loss of a Patient: Reflection and Connection Through Prose

By Hedy S. Wald Lean machine of prose, stripped down to the essence, and a power-packed way to care for the caregiver… this was my experience of the 55-word story genre1 at a writing seminar.2  While I had some experience writing haiku, I was generally accustomed to reflective narratives3 as “story” so was nothing short […]

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02/07/2017

Loss: The Hidden Barrier to Professional Identity Formation

By Meaghan P. Ruddy Paying attention to the wider trends in medical education recently makes it difficult to miss the growing voice of Pamela Wible, MD and her crusade to end physician, resident and medical student suicides.  One premise of her argument is that all the language around burnout and resilience misses the point.  The […]

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01/31/2017

Anatomy from the Inside: An Anatomist’s Experience as Patient

By Robert Frysztak Many stories have been written by physicians describing their personal experiences as a patient. But I cannot recall reading a similar perspective from a research scientist or medical educator, one who has intimate knowledge of anatomy and physiology paralleling or exceeding that of most physicians.  I would like to share with you […]

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01/27/2017

Medicine and the Holocaust in Medical Education: International Holocaust Remembrance Day – January 27

By Hedy S. Wald “Medicine was used for villainous ends during the Holocaust.  The Holocaust was an enormous trauma inflicted on human dignity and the human person; medicine was implicated in crimes against humanity.”  His Eminence Daniel Cardinal DiNardo, Archbishop of Galveston-Houston.1 January 27 is International Holocaust Remembrance Day, a day designated by the United Nations […]

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01/25/2017

DACA Medical Students- Making America Great Again!

By Kimrey Van Perre My friends have been called “courageous” for sharing their plight as undocumented students with the US Congress.  They have been called “DREAMers” due to the Dream Act that has been repeatedly introduced in Congress but never passed.  I call them “selfless” and “unrelenting” in their commitment to the medically underserved despite […]

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