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Author Archive: reflectivemeded

About reflectivemeded

04/10/2018

Closing the Door on the “Closing Doors” Metaphor: Reframing our Step 1 Advice

By Emily Green Anyone who advises medical students about USMLE Step 1 will be familiar with the metaphor of “closing doors”.  Upon receiving their Step 1 score, worried students wonder if the sound they are hearing is the slamming shut of gateways to particular specialties.  The problem with the pervasive “closing doors” metaphor is that […]

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04/03/2018

In My Panic Zone: Teaching Feedback Seeking

By J.M. Monica van de Ridder Teaching is something that I have been doing for over 20 years. So, in general, I don’t worry about it. I think I know what works and does not work. Things were very different for me this time. I was worried, and I felt very much out of my […]

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03/27/2018

Extension

By Tim Lahey Every March I run the last required course at our medical school. It’s a three-week-long, 47-hour sprint – a sort of boot camp for professional formation. We polish clinical skills, revisit foundational sciences, let students pick from a menu of interesting tutorials, and discuss professional formation. Students grapple with hypothetical gastrointestinal crises […]

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03/20/2018

What Diversity and Inclusion Means to Me: A Science of Learning Perspective

By Adrian K. Reynolds Over the past few months, I’ve been on a quest to answer this one question: How does my mission to create opportunities for students to develop self-regulated, active learning1,2 skills support diversity and inclusion? In this quest to raise my level of critical consciousness3, or, in my African American Vernacular English, […]

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03/12/2018

From Marjory Stoneman Douglas to Medical School: A Call to Action

by Zarna Patel I cannot find the right words to describe how it felt when I read news: “School shooting at High School in Southeastern Florida.”  Despite the 239 school shootings since Sandy Hook, nothing can prepare you for the numbness of having it happen in your hometown.  The way your heart leaps into your […]

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02/20/2018

Going the Extra Mile: A Med Student’s Marathon

By Shoshana B. Weiner “4 ounces water every mile, half an electrolyte ‘gu’ pack over 2.5 miles, ¼ energy bar every 6 miles.”  AKA how did you manage training for a marathon while in medical school?  The simple truth: I decided to run a marathon so I did.  Longer story: months of rigorous training, more […]

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02/13/2018

Power, Diversity and Medical Regulation: State Medical Boards Move Beyond the Old Boys’ Club

By David Johnson Recently, the Association of American Medical Colleges announced that for the first time ever women comprised the majority of matriculants into US medical school programs.  This triggered a few thoughts of my own. In 2017, I debuted my Twitter account focusing on the history of medical regulation.  In the fall of that […]

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02/05/2018

Overcoming Uncertainty through Experience

By Michelle Sergi Coming out of my first year of medical school I struggled with my sense of confidence.  After endless nights of studying, a multitude of experiences at our Clinical Training and Assessment Center, and specialized clinical experiences, I felt that I could take on the challenge of counseling patients.  On the other hand, […]

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01/16/2018

The Physician’s Role in the Rising Cost of Prescription Drugs

By Angira Patel When I started my medical training, my pediatrics residency program banned all pharmaceutical sponsorship of activities.  No free lunch in the middle of the day, no fancy dinners at expensive restaurants, or trips to conferences paid for by a pharmaceutical company.  Even my lab coat was unadorned by the colorful pens given […]

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01/09/2018

“You Had To Be There …” Caring for a Patient to the End of Her Life

By David C. Leach It has been more than thirty years since she first came to see me – a vital woman in her early seventies who had detected a lump in her breast on a self-exam. A diagnostic work up confirmed cancer and the smallish lesion was removed. It never recurred. By the time […]

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