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03/19/2017

The Semantics of Therapy, Part II

A previous blog post of “The Semantics of Therapy” posed three questions about the human genome being a “patient” to be treated. One reader found the post “provocative and disturbing” and called for further explanation and discussion of the questions posed. That will take some time and several postings. The first of the questions to be considered is this: If the “patient” is a genome, to whom... // Read More »

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03/19/2017

The Semantics of Therapy, Part II

A previous blog post of “The Semantics of Therapy” posed three questions about the human genome being a “patient” to be treated. One reader found the post “provocative and disturbing” and called for further explanation and discussion of the questions posed. That will take some time and several postings. The first of the questions to be considered is this: If the “patient” is a genome, to whom... // Read More »

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03/19/2017

Marwa Bouchenafa – French Court Orders Clinicians to Treat Baby over Their Objections

Marwa Bouchenafa was born in November 2015. Last September, she suffered a severe viral infection that resulted in neurological damage, paralyzed limbs, and dependence on mechanical ventilation. In November 2016, the hospital determined that further...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/18/2017

Involuntary Discharge from Dialysis

Robert Allan Bear Health law students studying rules on the formation and termination of treatment relationships know the case of Brenda Payton.   Her nephrologist had a long, long list of reasons to involuntarily discharge her.  But what...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/17/2017

Jahi McMath – Assess Whether She Is Alive in April 2017

This week, one of the medical defendants in Jahi McMath's medical malpractice action filed a case management statement.   It states that an IME (Independent Medical Exam) will be completed by 04/30/17.  This means that the defendants (jointl...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/17/2017

Equipoise and Caution Regarding “Ethical” Stem-Cell Therapy

You may have seen one of the many news reports this week about an “adult” stem cell treatment gone bad.  In it, doctors, not working in regulated industry or in the bounds of a clinical trial, injected stem cells derived from a person’s fatty tissue into the eyeballs of three people in an attempt to treat a vision-destroying condition called macular degeneration—and all three lost... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care, Stem Cells and tagged , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

03/17/2017

Ethics of the Trump Budget: The Social Contract is Dead

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

President Trump released his blueprint for a 2018 federal budget. From an ethical standpoint, the President seems to operates from a Hobbesian standpoint—life is nasty, brutish and short. However, unlike Hobbes who believed that we came together to protect ourselves from this reality, the new budget seems to encourage this idea. The new budget makes deep cuts to all social and scientific programs while boosting the military. In Hobbesian terms, Trumps’ social contract is all about bullying outsiders while leaving insiders in a state of hopeless diffidence.

Since World War II, the United States has invested heavily in science and technology, developing transportation, and building a better world (and winning wars).…

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03/16/2017

Losing Parties at Ontario CCB Retaliate through Medical Board Complaints

A few days ago, the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board affirmed a decision of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario not to take action against a physician.   I was pleased to see this result, because the complaint concerned ac...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/15/2017

How private should genetic information be?

One of the issues regarding genetic testing is the privacy of that information. It has been recognized for some time that employers and others could use genetic information in ways that would cause problems for those whose genetic information they were able to access. Because of that the federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibit employers from asking... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged . Posted by Steve Phillips. Bookmark the permalink.

03/15/2017

7th Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference

The Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Workgroup and the WMU Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine Program in Medical Ethics, Humanities & Law is proud to announce the 7th Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference

September 14-15, 2017

Kalamazoo, Michigan

Overview:  Proponents of medical humanities contend that the humanistic dimensions of medicine and health are a critical component of those disciplines; not only do these dimensions help us to understand the very nature of medicine and health, their apprehension allows caregivers to relate to their patients, to treat those patients with respect and dignity, and to provide more holistic and empathetic care. 


The 7th Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference is committed to the creative, dynamic, interdisciplinary explorations of the range of themes within the broad theme of medical humanities. This highly interdisciplinary conference draws participants from a wide range of backgrounds, including those from academic, creative, and medical communities.


Keynotes: This year’s conference Keynote speakers will be Dr. Jay Baruch and Professor Katie Watson.


AbstractsAbstracts will be considered in the following categories:

  • Oral Presentations: 20 minute presentations by one or two authors
  • Panel discussions: 60 minute presentations by a panel of speakers (generally 3-5). Panel discussions are expected to be interdisciplinary and explore a single topic from multiple perspectives.
  • Workshops: 60-90 minute presentations with a focus on audience interaction and the creation of some artwork. Previous successful workshops have included mentored drawing, poetry writing, performance dance, etc.
  • Posters/Visual Arts: Displays of visual arts, and performances (including dance, musical, theatre, etc.) are welcome.

Submission Guidelines: Submissions should include name, departmental/institutional affiliation, project title, and an abstract not to exceed 500 words. Proposals should be submitted electronically by April 1 in either .doc/.docx or .pdf format to medical-humanities@wmich.edu. Please indicate which theme the abstract falls under (e.g., philosophy/ethics, clinical practice, religion, conceptual or empirical research, performance/visual arts, history, etc.) Accepted presentations will be notified by May 1; conference registration will be required of all presenters.

New this year, there will be special sessions dedicated to graduate and undergraduate student presentations, with prizes available for exceptional presentations.


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.