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07/18/2014

Safeguarding Children in Emergencies through Ethical Pediatric Research

Tomorrow, the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) will present its recommendations on pediatric medical countermeasure (MCM) research at the 10th Annual Pediatric Bioethics Conference in Seattle. The conference, hosted by the Treuman Katz Center for Pediatric Bioethics at the Seattle Children’s Hospital, takes place July 18 and 19, 2014; its […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Alannah Kittle. Bookmark the permalink.

07/18/2014

Pope Cited by NRLC before Senate Judiciary Committee

Many of my (pro-liberty) positions on end-of-life medical treatment issues do not endear me to the National Right to Life Committee.  

But I do aim to produce careful and circumspect scholarship.  Consequently, I was pleased to see the presi…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

Great but “unaffordable” new drugs

I’ve posted several times on the challenges posed by new drugs that work, but cost the moon.  It’s one thing when an expensive drug is only marginally effective.  It’s another when the drug looks really good, like Kalydeco for cystic fibrosis or Sovaldi for hepatitis C.  I’ve suggested here and here that both drugs are worth high prices, although pushback from payers on the price… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

Nature Isn’t What It Used To Be

Gregory E. Kaebnick

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Susan Gilbert. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Brother

by Sean Philpott-Jones, Director of the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership Actress Laverne Cox made history last week when she was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actress for her role on the hit show “Orange is the New Black.” Ms. Cox is the first openly transgender actress to receive an Emmy nomination. While […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by The Bioethics Program. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

Only a Third Who Express a Preference to Die at Home, Actually Die at Home

There is a well-known discrepancy between people’s preferences to die at home and their likelihood to actually die at home.  This has already been measured several times.  Now, there is additional confirmation.

Last week, the UK Office of Na…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

Rationing Is Not a Four-Letter Word

Philip M. Rosoff is a practicing physician and Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Duke University Medical Center, where he is also a member scholar of the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine, and Director of Clinical Ethics at Duke University Hospital.

He has just published Rationing Is Not a Four-Letter Word with MIT Press.  I like this book’s thesis and explored it (a little) in some posts like “Top 10 North American Death Panels.”


Here is the abstract:

Most people would agree that the healthcare system in the United States is a mess. Healthcare accounts for a larger percentage of gross domestic product in the United States than in any other industrialized nation, but health outcomes do not reflect this enormous investment. In this book, Philip Rosoff offers a provocative proposal for providing quality healthcare to all Americans and controlling the out-of-control costs that threaten the economy. He argues that rationing—often associated in the public’s mind with such negatives as unplugging ventilators, death panels, and socialized medicine—is not a dirty word. A comprehensive, centralized, and fair system of rationing is the best way to distribute the benefits of modern medicine equitably while achieving significant cost savings.

Rosoff points out that certain forms of rationing already exist when resources are scarce and demand high: the organ transplant system, for example, and the distribution of drugs during a shortage. He argues that if we incorporate certain key features from these systems, healthcare rationing would be fair—and acceptable politically. Rosoff considers such topics as fairness, decisions about which benefits should be subject to rationing, and whether to compensate those who are denied scarce resources. Finally, he offers a detailed discussion of what an effective and equitable healthcare rationing system would look like.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2014

Reading the Body: Live!

Stacy Bodziak, Managing Editor, Bellevue Literary Review
Not many literary evenings are divided into sections on “Dissection,” “Bone,” “Brain,” “HEENT,” and “Heart,” but then again, it’s not often that the readings are selected to complement Frank Netter’s iconic illustrations. This past spring, the Bellevue Literary Review (BLR), a journal published by NYU School of Medicine, [...]

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07/16/2014

Freedom and our connection to the root

It has been almost a month since the CBHD summer bioethics conference and I am still reflecting on some of the things I experienced there. One that left a lasting impact was the presentation by a sculptor, Karen Swenholt, which was sponsored by the Tennessee Center for Bioethics and Culture on Friday evening. As she presented slides of her art and talked about the meaning… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Steve Phillips. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2014

Defending Advance VSED – Hasten Death by Dehydration

VSED has been getting a lot of attention lately.  NPR radio host Diane Rehm discussed her husband’s use of VSED to hasten his death.  Sir Chris Woodhead discussed VSED in the ongoing assisted dying debate that will reach the House of Lords on…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.