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10/16/2014

The Best-Selling Biologic Drugs

Biologic drugs are a big deal for the pharmaceutical industry right now. Blockbuster chemicals for common conditions like diabetes and hypertension are largely things of the past. We’re getting pretty good at controlling those conditions, and few people expect a … Continue reading

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10/16/2014

The Great Ebola Race: An appeal to honor the common good

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In the time of the black plague, people with symptoms were often placed into separate areas. The sick and symptomatic were separated from the general populace.

When ships came into harbors they were often kept there for weeks until it was assured that they did not carry disease with them.

Cities would close their gates to travels to prevent anyone from arriving who might bring disease as well as to protect travelers from disease when it raged within.

When immigrants passed through Ellis Island with symptoms of infectious diseases they were kept on the island until they were better or sent back home.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Public Health and tagged , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

10/16/2014

Minnesota Sentences Melchert-Dinkel to 178 Days in Jail for Assisted Suicide

Even in the five states (MT, NM, OR, VT, WA) where aid in dying is legal, assisted suicide is not.  


Aid in dying is for capacitated, terminally ill patients like Brittany Maynard.  In contrast, assisted suicide occurs under less controlled and less justifiable circumstances.  


Case in point:  William Melchert-Dinkel, who was just re-sentenced in Minnesota for preying upon suicidal people — encouraging two to take their lives.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/16/2014

Dying in America: IOM Recommendations and Next Steps for Stakeholders

On September 17, 2014, the Institute of Medicine released the report Dying in America: Improving Quality and Honoring Individual Preferences Near the End of Life, in which an expert committee identified “persistent major gaps in care near the end of life that require urgent attention from numerous stakeholder groups.” The committee made comprehensive recommendations in the areas of care delivery, clinician–patient communication and advance care planning, professional education and development, payment systems and policies, and public engagement and education.

On November 10, 2014 (1:00 ET), the IOM will present a webinar that will review the recommendations, explore possible next steps and barriers to implementation, and provide an opportunity for stakeholder groups to join the conversation. (Register here)  The webinar will feature brief presentations and an extended Q&A session with: 

  • Philip Pizzo (committee co-chair), Stanford University School of Medicine
  • David M. Walker (committee co-chair), Former U.S Comptroller General
  • Christian Sinclair (committee member), Gentiva Health Services (through September 2014)
  • Adrienne Stith Butler (study director), Institute of Medicine

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/15/2014

Bioethics Commission to Offer Presentations at ASBH This Week

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) is pleased to offer multiple presentations at the American Society for Bioethics and the Humanities (ASBH) Annual Meeting, scheduled for October 16-19 in San Diego, Calif. Over the course of the four day conference Bioethics Commission staff will highlight a number of bioethical issues, […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Alannah Kittle. Bookmark the permalink.

10/15/2014

Family Update on Jahi McMath

This was posted to Facebook today:

“MESSAGE FROM JAHI’S MOTHER, NAILAH:
Hello Everyone, I wanted to take this time out to thank you all for every donation every prayer and every positive thought you send Jahi’s way. Jahi is physically stable. All of h…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

10/14/2014

Contain AND Extinguish

Dr. Tom Frieden, Director of the Centers for Disease Control, wrote an article published on October 9th entitled, “Why I don’t support a travel ban to combat Ebola outbreak.” In it he provides ten arguments against a travel ban; these arguments can be categorized as those claiming that such a ban would be ineffective, harmful, and unnecessary. Unfortunately for Dr. Frieden, they raise more questions… // Read More »

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10/14/2014

Why we ignored Ebola until recently

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Ebola burst onto the scene in 1976 when a thirty-old man arrived at the Yambuku Mission Hospital in Zaire complaining of severe diarrhea. He left the hospital two days afterwards and was never found again. In the days and weeks that followed, people who were patients or care providers at this facility when he was there all died after experiencing dehydration, fever, vomiting, diarrhea, and bleeding everywhere. The death rate was staggering, as over 80% of affected patients did not recover.

Since then, the CDC reports there have been 34 distinct outbreaks of the five strains of Ebola.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Health Care, Politics, Public Health and tagged , , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

10/14/2014

Cognitive (neuro)science and bioethics

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

In a recent article in Ethics, “Beyond Point-and-Shoot Morality: Why Cognitive (Neuro)Science Matters for Ethics,” Josh Greene argues that empirical research in moral judgment has significant relevance for normative ethics in that it (1) exposes the inner workings of our moral judgments, revealing that we should have less confidence in some of our judgments and the ethical theories that are based on them, and (2) informs us of where we tend to rely on intuition or automatic processing (which is often heavily emotive), but ought to rely more manual, controlled processing (such as consequentialist reasoning).…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Neuroethics, Philosophy & Ethics. Posted by Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby. Bookmark the permalink.

10/14/2014

Supreme Court of Canada Hears Arguments on Aid in Dying

Tomorrow, the Supreme Court of Canada hears arguments on whether terminally ill Canadians have right to a doctor-assisted death.

Twenty-one ago, the court upheld the law that criminalizes physician and in dying.  But, as many of the more t…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.