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09/21/2016

War Metaphors in Health Care: What Are They Good For?

by Kayhan Parsi, JD PhD

Protest singer Edwin Starr powerfully asked in the early 1970s: “War, what is it good for?” Apparently, it’s good enough to use in a variety of metaphorical turns of phrase. The war on poverty. The war on cancer. The war on Alzheimer’s. The war on drugs. The war metaphor seems irresistible. How else to elevate a social problem and make it the object of our intense focus and attention, not to mention financial support? These metaphors figure prominently in many areas of public life. Take policing. As scholars Peter Kraska and Victor Kappeler have stated about the use of military metaphors in policing: “The ideological filter encased within the war metaphor is ‘militarism,’ defined as a set of beliefs and values that stress the use of force and domination as appropriate means to solve problems and gain political power”.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Media and tagged , , . Posted by Kayhan Parsi. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2016

FDA Approval Brought To You By Popular Demand

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In a surprising move, the Food and Drug Administration approved Exondys, a drug that has not been proven to work, did not have a randomized control trial, and that recommended against  by an independent expert panel.  The approval was via the accelerated pathway “which provides for the approval of drugs that treat serious or life-threatening diseases and generally provide a meaningful advantage over existing treatment. Approval under this pathway can be based on adequate and well-controlled studies showing the drug has an effect on a surrogate endpoint that is reasonably likely to predict clinical benefit to patients.” You just need to show a likelihood of benefit, not proof that it works.…

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This entry was posted in Clinical Trials & Studies, Featured Posts, Pharmaceuticals and tagged , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2016

Welcome Fall 2016 Master’s Students!

The Ethics and Society blog is delighted to welcome the following candidates to Fordham University’s Master of Arts in Ethics and Society: Kelly Collins graduated in 2011 with a BS in Philosophy and Political Science from Florida State University.  After moving to New York … Continue reading

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09/21/2016

Introducing New Deliberative Scenario and Teacher Companion from the Bioethics Commission: “Return of Genetic Research Results”

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has released two new educational materials, “Deliberative Scenario: The Return of Genetic Research Results” and “Teacher Companion for Deliberative Scenario: Return of Genetic Research Results.”

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Ijeoma Egekeze. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2016

The High Price of Free Lunch

Once again: correlation does not equal causation. And it is possible that companies give lunches to physicians who are already inclined to prescribe their products, or who are already high prescribers. But why should we leave any of this up … Continue reading

The post The High Price of Free Lunch appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

09/21/2016

Better Decision Making for Incapacitated Patients without Surrogates

This afternoon, I am making a presentation to the North Dakota Long Term Care Association on "Better Decision Making for Incapacitated Patients without Surrogates." I prepared a new 300 slide deck and have posted it here.  I will also be building...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2016

My Experience with Texas Campus Carry Laws as a New Professor

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Like many other new assistant professors across America, I spent the weeks before the beginning of the new fall semester in orientations covering everything from my university’s tenure requirements to how to fill out my health insurance forms to how to get a campus ID card. Because I am a new assistant professor at a public university in the state of Texas, my orientation also included briefings on the new campus carry laws.

On August 1st students (who have met other requirements for owning a weapon such as age, permits, etc.) were granted legal permission to carry a concealed weapon on the grounds of public universities in Texas, making it the eighth state in the USA to do so.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Health Regulation & Law and tagged , , , . Posted by Keisha Ray. Bookmark the permalink.

09/20/2016

#WhiteCoats4BlackLives

The capturing on video of the recent death of Terence Crutcher due to a police shooting has renewed concern about the respect paid to black lives in U.S. society.  ReflectiveMedEd reprints these remarks from a #WhiteCoats4BlackLives event at the Loyola University Chicago Stritch School of Medicine which was part of a national observance that gathered […]

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09/20/2016

Minnesota Ethics Law & Futility Symposium

Join me, Mitchell Hamline School of Law, and Children's Minnesota on November 18 for "Ethics, Law, and Futility" Symposium.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

09/19/2016

Late Term Zika Abortions: Thankfully not Euthanasia

If I were the editor of a recent Newsweek article by Cornell Law Professor Sherry F. Colb, the above title would have been my choice for her article. I must encourage you to read the actual article, lest you believe that the summary that follows is somehow taken grossly out of context. Her concern is that a late term abortion to terminate the life of... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , , , . Posted by Mark McQuain. Bookmark the permalink.