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04/15/2015

National Healthcare Decisions Day

Tomorrow is National Healthcare Decisions Day.  Do you have an advance directive?  Is is up-to-date with your agent and alternate agent?  If not, get it done today.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

04/14/2015

VSED Podcast on TWIHL

Check out my podcast on VSED as well as others in the new series THE WEEK IN HEALTH LAW.   Each week, health law professors Frank Pasquale and Nicolas Terry bring in a guest to discuss the most pressing issues in Health Law & Policy.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

04/14/2015

Is there a “Right to Try” Experimental Drugs?

From The State Journal-Register (Springfield, IL) Patient freedom, ethics at the heart of ‘Right to Try’ push in Illinois Some doctors worry that an effort to grant terminally ill people more access to unproven drugs might offer them false hope or even be harmful, but advocates for a “right to try” say patients should have […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Chris MacDonald. Bookmark the permalink.

04/14/2015

LIVING WILLS, GREYHOUNDS AND GOALPOSTS

National Healthcare Decisions Day – April 16, 2015

By John G. Carney, MEd, President and CEO
Center for Practical Bioethics


For years, I’ve been curious to know whether people fail to complete living wills and avoid naming a healthcare agent out of procrastination or a false sense of confidence that they have plenty of time to do it later.

Reality is, if you don’t do it when you don’t have to, it’s not likely to go well when you do. Naming someone during a time of crisis to speak on your behalf can be downright cruel, especially when you’ve not shared much about the things that are really important to you.

Share What’s Important

What are those things? Well, they aren’t scary or monumental. They include things like how important laughing, talking, sharing and “just being” are to you. Don’t get all tied up in feeding tubes. Instead think about what sharing a meal means to you. Is it a means to an end or an end in itself?

I once shared a house with an older-than-me bachelor and swore when he ate at home he never cooked anything that didn’t come in a box and could go in a microwave. I, on the other hand, started just about every meal sautéing fresh onions and garlic in olive oil. Food had entirely different meanings to us, and that became starkly evident to me when we talked about his dad’s early onset Alzheimer’s and how differently he approached the question of feeding tubes when the difficult question arose in his family.

So stop worrying about a tube in every orifice! Instead think about the sharing what you want more than anything – even at the end. Don’t obsess about completing a living will (aka healthcare directive) to the point that it paralyzes you from acting. Instead, take the time to share with someone who loves and cares for you what’s important to you as you think about life in general and especially its final stages. Focus on the positive - the most fulfilling aspects of your life. This isn’t a “bucket list” of items to do, but rather a sharing of values and convictions. What do relationships, solitude, faith, nature, self-expression and art, work, music and family mean to you?

Then, when that’s all done, ask that person to be your agent. And then promise that person that you’ll do it again in a year or two down the road – or whenever you have a major event in your life – from the birth of a child to the diagnosis of a serious illness. Life happens and, while our wishes and dreams may alter, you’ll be comforted by the fact that values – real bedrock beliefs about life and love – pretty much stay the same. But don’t assume even those close to you know all that.

Recognize Greyhounds and Goalposts

Over the years I’ve learned about two very important syndromes that all of us deal with differently. One is called the “Greyhound Syndrome.” It’s the phenomenon that sometimes we experience a great freedom of anonymity sitting next to a perfect stranger (on a bus traveling cross country) and share our deepest thoughts more freely than we do with those we’ve shared a lifetime with. Hospice volunteers can regale you with stories they’ve heard, never to share again, by a dying patient. These are not necessarily dark secrets of our past so much as unvoiced hidden treasures. Some are worth sharing before we die; others are worth taking to the grave. Think about which is which.

The other syndrome is what’s called “Moving Goal Posts.” This phenomenon deals with how some future state or health condition may appear unacceptable at one point in our lives and much more acceptable at another. That’s why checking boxes and lists on living will forms doesn’t work for people in states of relative good health. But stories, treasured thoughts, values and convictions work at every level.

Have a Caring Conversation Today

So take a leap and share your stories with someone you love. And, this April 16, on National Healthcare Decisions Day, have a caring conversation. Name an agent. Start talking about what matters most and don’t make it a somber depressing discussion. Think about it as a gift to those you love that will lead to peace of mind – for you and them. Because it likely will – far more likely than leaving it to chance. Close to 85% of us will have to rely on someone else to make our final wishes known. 

If you need help getting started, we’ve got a little booklet that will help you do just that. Download a free Caring Conversations workbook or order a printed version from the Center for Practical Bioethics’ website.

Seize the moment and turn what you thought was morbid and ghoulish into the marvelous and glorious. You may just discover something about a loved one that will serve you both in the moment and for a lifetime.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Practical Bioethics. Bookmark the permalink.

04/14/2015

The Anchoring Heuristic Courtesy of Dilbert

Heuristics is jargon used by decision psychologists and behavioral economists to refer to cognitive shortcuts we humans take to make judgments and decisions. One of the first heuristics identified as such by Danny Kahneman and Amos Tversky was the anchoring … Continue reading

The post The Anchoring Heuristic Courtesy of Dilbert appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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04/14/2015

Let’s do a Better Job Educating Everyone

<p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Last week we posted an article to our Facebook page from the Washington Post entitled “<a href="http://www.washingtonpost.com/posteverything/wp/2015/02/18/we-dont-need-more-stem-majors-we-need-more-stem-majors-with-liberal-arts-training/?tid=sm_fb">We don’t need more STEM majors. We need more STEM majors with liberal arts training</a>”.</span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">  </span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Reading this got me to thinking and a bit of reminiscing about my own education. Long before STEM meant science technology engineering and math I was a STEM major. I received my undergraduate degree from the University of Illinois in 1972 from the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences. That is, I was a STEM major who received a liberal arts education. The replacement of the word “education” for “training” is intentional on my part as I value education far beyond training but I digress.  I focused on science to the greatest degree possible with a biology major and a chemistry/physics minor. But as a student in the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences I was required to complete requirements which were satisfied by sequences in social sciences, humanities, foreign language, and rhetoric. I remember these experiences to varying degrees. Some are fond memories, some seemed more like torture. Collectively, however, I look back on these courses as a great well rounded and very rewarding educational experience. I do have every confidence that I benefited greatly from my non-STEM courses and they helped me with the skills and the experience to better communicate as a scientist and the non-scientific responsibilities I also had as a faculty member.</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> </span></p>

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.

04/13/2015

A Not-So-Open Discussion

Courtney Thiele posted on March 3oth about an article in the Washington Post describing “a new push to de-stigmatize the nation’s most controversial medical procedure by talking about it openly and unapologetically.” A clinic in Maryland called “Carafem” dispenses abortion pills, and “promises a ‘spa-like’ experience for women with an open and unabashed approach to pregnancy termination.” (quotations from the Washington Post’s article) This clinic... // Read More »

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04/13/2015

(anti)Discrimination Starts in the Womb

During law school I had the opportunity to take many courses related to health law, including a class on disability law, as well as a class that discussed emerging medical technologies. Though these classes were taught by different professors, and focused on different issues, in each class the theme of discrimination was present. At some point in each respective class, the topic of discrimination based... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Courtney Thiele. Bookmark the permalink.

04/13/2015

Residual Dried Blood and New Born Screening in Minnesota

Note: The Bioethics Program blog is moving to its new home on April 1, 2015. Be sure to change your bookmarks to http://bioethics.uniongraduatecollege.edu/blog/ by Courtney Jarboe, Bioethics Program Student In Minnesota, residual dried blood (RDB) samples collected for newborn screening had been stored, retained, and used for research without parental consent. It had been presumed that the Minnesota Department of […]

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care, Public Health and tagged , , , , . Posted by The Bioethics Program. Bookmark the permalink.

04/13/2015

Gratitude for Rev. Gardner C. Taylor

Remembered by Dr. Robert Lee Hill, Senior Minister
Community Christian Church, Kansas City, Missouri

When a comprehensive American religious history of the 20th century is finally compiled, the magisterial preaching eloquence of the Rev. Dr. Gardner C. Taylor will be remembered with astonishment and abiding, awe-struck admiration. Dr. Taylor died on Sunday, April 5. He was 96.

For more than 70 years, Dr. Taylor held forth among African American Baptists and a panoramic array of religious adherents throughout the United States and around the world as an orator with few if any peers.

MLK’s Favorite Preacher

As the pastor of the Concord Baptist Church of Christ in Brooklyn, New York, for 42 years, and afterwards in retirement, Dr. Taylor engaged the issues of his community, the nation and the world with passion, insight and effectiveness. He artfully combined the necessary durative dynamic of transcendence with the equally necessary punctiliar character of incarnation.

With Martin Luther King, Jr., who called Dr. Taylor his “favorite” preacher, he helped found The Progressive National Baptist Church in order for congregations to better address and overcome the ravages of racism and segregation in the U.S. Working from the North, he led the Concord church and many other congregations to raise funds for Dr. King’s efforts in the South.

Dr. Taylor also served on the New York City Board of Education and was always involved in issues that arose in the “public square” of Brooklyn and greater New York. In his later years, Dr. Taylor worried that many religious leaders and their congregations had lost their “prophetic edge” and might fall into the trap of merely mirroring a consumeristic culture.’’

Compassion Sabbath in Kansas City

Whenever he spoke and wherever he travelled, Dr. Taylor dealt with ethical issues and matters of public significance, including when he came to Kansas City.

The Center for Practical Bioethics will remain abidingly thankful for Dr. Taylor’s presence in Kansas City in 1999 at the launching of “Compassion Sabbath,” which engaged more than 80,000 faith community leaders and members in hundreds of congregations in an interfaith initiative to increase the quality of care for those facing the end of life. At a breakfast gathering at Union Station, he spoke compellingly of the need for honesty and compassion in relation to the experience of debilitation and pain at the end of life.

During the time of a sabbatical journey in 2010, I was privileged to share a long interview/conversation with Dr. Taylor in his home in Raleigh, North Carolina. In retirement, Dr. Taylor echoed in his meditations what he put forth as a preacher, pastor, and activist for the betterment of humanity. Well into his 90's, Dr. Taylor spoke plainly and with swift clarity about the process of aging. When asked about what he prayed for, he said his personal prayers were "to get out without too much pain." And he added, with a chuckle, "And I'm ready to get out, I'm ready to go."

People in the pew, the academy of homileticians, and awe-struck fellow clergy regarded Dr. Taylor as a singular personality whose like only comes around once every century or so. We would agree and only add that we’re so glad that he came to Kansas City to share his extraordinary voice for the intertwining for what is “good” and what is “right.”

Note: The Kansas City Star published an article about Dr. Gardner on April 11, 2015, describing his pulpit as “the most prestigious in black Christendom.”

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