Blog RSS Blog.

12/14/2018

More Brain Death Cases Going to Court

I have collected and written about a number of brain death cases that have recently gone to courts in the United States, Canada, and the UK.  But most court cases are difficult to find, because they are handled on an expedited basis in local tria...

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

12/13/2018

“The Babies are the Experiment”

By Jon Holmlund   The Thursday, Dec 13 edition of the Wall Street Journal carries this headline:  “Doubts Arise Over Gene-Editing Claim.”  The work behind the recent report that the world’s first two gene-edited babies had been born has been publicly discussed, but the details have not yet been published for full scientific review.  Apparently …

Continue reading "“The Babies are the Experiment”"

Full Article

This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

12/13/2018

Measures of Physician Quality Don’t Measure Up

Physician reimbursement increasingly depends upon measures of healthcare quality. Physicians who fall short on quality measures now face financial penalties. But it might be quality measures, themselves, that are falling short, according to a study conducted by the American College Physicians. … Continue reading

The post Measures of Physician Quality Don’t Measure Up appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by PeterUbel.com. Bookmark the permalink.

12/13/2018

He Jiankui’s Genetic Misadventure, Part 2: How Different Are Chinese and Western Bioethics?

When the world’s first research on editing the genes of human embryos by Chinese scientists  was published in an international journal in 2015, a report in the New York Times characterised the key issue involved as “a scientific ethical divide between China and West.” Earlier this year, an article in the magazine Foreign Policy by… Read more

The post He Jiankui’s Genetic Misadventure, Part 2: How Different Are Chinese and Western Bioethics? appeared first on The Hastings Center.

Full Article

12/12/2018

Is Your Boss Discriminating Against You Because You Smoke?

Obamacare gave employers permission to charge smokers up to 50% more for health insurance, as a way to incentivize healthier behavior. But to make sure smokers had a fair chance to avoid these penalties, the law required employers to provide tobacco cessation … Continue reading

The post Is Your Boss Discriminating Against You Because You Smoke? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

Full Article

This entry was posted in Ethics, Health Care and tagged , . Posted by PeterUbel.com. Bookmark the permalink.

12/12/2018

Medical Bankruptcy Is Much Less Common Than Elizabeth Warren Tells You

Elizabeth Warren describes medical bills as “the leading cause of personal bankruptcy” in the United States. She bases that opinion in part on her own research, in which she and her collaborators surveyed people who had experienced personal bankruptcy, asked them whether they’d … Continue reading

The post Medical Bankruptcy Is Much Less Common Than Elizabeth Warren Tells You appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by PeterUbel.com. Bookmark the permalink.

12/12/2018

At the End of Life: The Physician’s Role, Responsibility, and Agency

Join me in Seattle for "At the End of Life: The Physician's Role, Responsibility, and Agency." This national two-day conference is Sept. 13 and 14, 2019, at the University of Washington in Seattle. We will explore the complex issues—professional, moral, and legal—facing physicians caring for dying patients. 

Physicians have the privilege and duty to care for patients at the end of life. Sometimes a physician’s actions factor into a patient’s death; such as discontinuing life-support (including ventilators, cardiac devices, and dialysis), clinically supporting patients who voluntarily stop eating and drinking (VSED), providing palliative sedation, and in states where it is legal, prescribing a lethal dose of medication to a dying patient. These cases have clinical, legal, ethical, sociocultural, and psychological dimensions that are often challenging for physicians to navigate.

At this conference, we'll set the stage for ongoing discussion of these practices and the issues physicians caring for dying patients often face, as both medical technology and patients’ requests for planned death evolve.

Speakers other than me include (among many others):

  • J. Randall Curtis
  • Linda Ganzini
  • Timothy Quill
  • Haider Warraich



Full Article

This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

12/12/2018

Hospitals Selling Patient Records To Data Brokers: A Violation of Patient Trust and Autonomy

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

I recently received an email from a community organization which asked the following question: “Are there any ethical issues with our community health plan selling its medical records to a private company?” This is not an example of a new occurrence. A spate of news in recent months suggests efforts by various private companies to get a hold of private medical records with the goal of finding a way to profit off this information (the commodification of our information). Consider Sloan Kettering’s dealto sell its pathography samples and records to Paige.AIto develop artificial intelligence to help in treating cancer (and with lots of conflicts of interests for the administrators who put together the deal).…

Full Article

12/11/2018

BioethicsTV (December 3-5): #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, PhD

Jump to The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 10): Epidemic & Virtue Ethics; Jump to Chicago Med (Season 4; Episode 9): Not following patient wishes

The Good Doctor (Season 2; Episode 10): Epidemic & Virtue Ethics

This episode revolves around an unidentified pathogen invading the ED when two patients are brought in immediately after their flight from Malaysia lands. Both of them die and the ED is quarantined: All ambulances are diverted and walk-ins are sent away. Rather than panicking people, their coming and going from the ED is slowed down or delayed. Once Tyler— the EMT who brought in the patients—becomes sicker, Lim lets everyone know that they are on lock down and no one is leaving.…

Full Article

12/11/2018

My Pediatrician

By Puja Nayak “Doctor,” I say, my voice fading. I hear footsteps running and my eyes shut. Hours later, I have a wire in me. I try and pull it out but my doctor stops me. “No, don’t do that sweetie.” I give her a look. I don’t understand why I’m here. My head is […]

Full Article