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07/17/2014

Nature Isn’t What It Used To Be

Gregory E. Kaebnick

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Susan Gilbert. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Brother

by Sean Philpott-Jones, Director of the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership Actress Laverne Cox made history last week when she was nominated for an Emmy for Outstanding Guest Actress for her role on the hit show “Orange is the New Black.” Ms. Cox is the first openly transgender actress to receive an Emmy nomination. While […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by The Bioethics Program. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

Only a Third Who Express a Preference to Die at Home, Actually Die at Home

There is a well-known discrepancy between people’s preferences to die at home and their likelihood to actually die at home.  This has already been measured several times.  Now, there is additional confirmation.

Last week, the UK Office of Na…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2014

Rationing Is Not a Four-Letter Word

Philip M. Rosoff is a practicing physician and Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Duke University Medical Center, where he is also a member scholar of the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine, and Director of Clinical Ethics at Duke University Hospital.

He has just published Rationing Is Not a Four-Letter Word with MIT Press.  I like this book’s thesis and explored it (a little) in some posts like “Top 10 North American Death Panels.”


Here is the abstract:

Most people would agree that the healthcare system in the United States is a mess. Healthcare accounts for a larger percentage of gross domestic product in the United States than in any other industrialized nation, but health outcomes do not reflect this enormous investment. In this book, Philip Rosoff offers a provocative proposal for providing quality healthcare to all Americans and controlling the out-of-control costs that threaten the economy. He argues that rationing—often associated in the public’s mind with such negatives as unplugging ventilators, death panels, and socialized medicine—is not a dirty word. A comprehensive, centralized, and fair system of rationing is the best way to distribute the benefits of modern medicine equitably while achieving significant cost savings.

Rosoff points out that certain forms of rationing already exist when resources are scarce and demand high: the organ transplant system, for example, and the distribution of drugs during a shortage. He argues that if we incorporate certain key features from these systems, healthcare rationing would be fair—and acceptable politically. Rosoff considers such topics as fairness, decisions about which benefits should be subject to rationing, and whether to compensate those who are denied scarce resources. Finally, he offers a detailed discussion of what an effective and equitable healthcare rationing system would look like.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2014

Reading the Body: Live!

Stacy Bodziak, Managing Editor, Bellevue Literary Review
Not many literary evenings are divided into sections on “Dissection,” “Bone,” “Brain,” “HEENT,” and “Heart,” but then again, it’s not often that the readings are selected to complement Frank Netter’s iconic illustrations. This past spring, the Bellevue Literary Review (BLR), a journal published by NYU School of Medicine, [...]

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07/16/2014

Freedom and our connection to the root

It has been almost a month since the CBHD summer bioethics conference and I am still reflecting on some of the things I experienced there. One that left a lasting impact was the presentation by a sculptor, Karen Swenholt, which was sponsored by the Tennessee Center for Bioethics and Culture on Friday evening. As she presented slides of her art and talked about the meaning… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Steve Phillips. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2014

Defending Advance VSED – Hasten Death by Dehydration

VSED has been getting a lot of attention lately.  NPR radio host Diane Rehm discussed her husband’s use of VSED to hasten his death.  Sir Chris Woodhead discussed VSED in the ongoing assisted dying debate that will reach the House of Lords on…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2014

de Beauvoir’s A Very Easy Death

My dissertation advisor recommended that I read Simone de Beauvoir’s A Very Easy Death when I was writing my dissertation on ambivalence.  Apparently de Beauvoir was ambivalent towards her mother. But when I read that book, I wasn’t struck by quotations on ambivalence, but by these. They speak for themselves and are absolutely moving, haunting, and manage to so accurately capture so much about human experience—especially the experience of witnessing others’ deaths, hospitalizations, and suffering.

When picking out her mother’s funeral clothes:  “Before, I went through all this without seeing it.  Now I know that it will form part of my life for ever.” (48).…

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This entry was posted in End of Life Care, Featured Posts, Philosophy & Ethics and tagged . Posted by Jennifer Blumenthal-Barby. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2014

Suicide Prevention: There’s an App for That

<p>I have been slow to fully embrace the full potential my smartphone. I have a few apps that I use regularly for entertainment or basic information, like weather updates and maps. It’s convenient. I can entertain myself with games or social networking while I wait in lines or for a child to finish theater rehearsals, basketball/ballet/swimming practices. If I look up, most others waiting in parked cars are doing the same thing, a faint blue glow radiating from somewhere below the steering wheel.  Before we had devices to entertain us, we would more than likely spend the minutes talking, person to person. I tend to think person to person is better, after all a pen and ink letter, sharing coffee at a small café table, or a supportive hug must mean more than emoticon symbols. But maybe these tiny pictures can convey the intended emotion and offer a substitute when the real thing must be delayed or is otherwise not possible. Where is the line at which an electronic emotion, or interpretation of feeling is no longer enough? When I first learned that there were suicide prevention apps, I was aghast. Have we lost so much human connectedness that even acute emotional despair is summarized in a miniature touch screen? How can an app provide the essential emergent interventions to a person in such despair that he or she is contemplating suicide? But if this is where our social focus is anyway, and the first place people search when looking for help, perhaps it is not such a bad idea.</p>
<p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI’s online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.

07/15/2014

A “diagnosis” a physician can no longer make?

If you were to follow the trends on gender identity discussion you would be unsurprised to see this article in The Slate: “Don’t Let the Doctor Do This to Your Newborn” The author begins by portraying a physician taking a newborn away from a worried mother for a “procedure,” which turns out to be gender “assignment.” This physician, described as stern, masked, dismissive, knuckle-cracking, paternalistic,… // Read More »

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