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02/13/2018

Want more efficient and cheaper medicine? Just outsource the doctor

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

A new medical school opening this fall in the University of Illinois system will focus on the tech revolution. The foundation of the school is technology and engineering and thus is selecting students with backgrounds in math, computers, and data science. They hope to train a new generation of clinicians who will “disrupt” how medicine is practiced. When the dean offered his vision of medicine practiced by the graduates, he described a scenario where patients talk to physicians through cell phones and where drones deliver diagnostic tools and treatments to your door.

I was taken aback when reading this news story in the February 9th issue of the Chicago Tribune.…

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This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, Featured Posts, Health Care, professional ethics. Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

02/12/2018

Physician-Assisted Death: Scanning the Landscape and Potential Approaches – A Workshop

Here is a copy of my slides from today's presentation at the National Academy of Sciences workshop, "Physician-Assisted Death: Scanning the Landscape and Potential Approaches."

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/11/2018

Addressing Demands for Medically Futile Measures: Objective and Subjective Policy Standards

Law student Hayley White has just published "Addressing Demands for Medically Futile Measures: Objective and Subjective Policy Standards" in the Journal of Health & Life Sciences Law.

"This Brief Insight will discuss the implications and shortcomings of the Unilateral Health Care Decisions Act and the Texas Advance Directives Act, which emphasizes the importance of creating clear procedures that are both objective and subjective so that treatment that may be inappropriate given the patient’s condition and prognosis can be adjusted and dealt with in an organized and systematic way."

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/10/2018

Waiting for the Last Bus: Reflections in Life and Death

Where do we go when we die? Or is there nowhere to go? Is death something we can do or is it just something that happens to us? Now in his ninth decade, former Bishop of Edinburgh Richard Holloway has spent a lifetime at the bedsides of the dying, gui...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/09/2018

West Virginia Nondiscrimination in Involuntary Denial of Treatment Act

Virginia bills that would authorize the "involuntary denial of treatment" are proceeding through the Virginia legislature. Meanwhile, the West Virginia legislature is considering a bill that would do exactly the opposite. H.B. 4467, based on a model a...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/09/2018

Ethics and Society Newsfeed – February 9, 2018

Politics The Circumscribed Ethics Investigation into Devin Nunes “The House Intelligence Committee chair claimed he’d been completely cleared, but the panel probing his conduct never gained access to the intelligence he was accused of divulging.” Trump’s Choice For Ethics Chief Wins Praise As ‘Somebody Who Plays It By The Book’ “Emory A. Rounds III is … More Ethics and Society Newsfeed – February 9, 2018

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02/09/2018

BioethicsTV (January 29-February 9): #TheResident, #TheGoodDoctor, #ChicagoMed

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The Resident (Season 1; Episode 3): The Cost of a Life The episode opens with residents and nurses attending a required meeting on billing by a “billing consultant”. The consultant’s message is to charge more: “Bill proactively,” “Upcode to what the disease could eventually affect.” Later, the consultant suggests running more tests. She distributes a brochure named “The Art of Upcoding” that is about getting more dollars out of each patient.  In one case, a patient scheduled for hernia surgery has his surgery canceled to get additional testing even though the surgeon says more tests are not needed.…

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This entry was posted in BioethicsTV, Clinical Ethics, End of Life Care, Featured Posts, Justice. Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

02/08/2018

Peering into the Future of Peer Review

by Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD and Nanette Elster, JD, MPH

If you try googling the term “peer review is,” one of the top search results is “broken.” This reflects some of the frustration and even cynicism about the peer review process.  Regarding the shortcomings of peer review, one is reminded of the famous quote attributed to Churchill (“democracy is the worst form of government, except for all the others.”) Yet peer review is still regarded as the holy grail of publishing—something that purportedly ensures high quality of new scholarship.  In this editorial, we would like to define peer review and analyze the current state of peer review, along with some possible changes and innovations.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, professional ethics and tagged , . Posted by Kayhan Parsi. Bookmark the permalink.

02/08/2018

Development and Certification of Decision Aids: Promoting Shared Decision-Making for Patients with Serious Illness

Join me at Harvard Law on April 18, 2018 for this important event: "The Development and Certification of Decision Aids: Promoting Shared Decision-Making for Patients with Serious Illness." (Note: I will also be at the 50th anniversary of brain death co...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/08/2018

Is Federal Policy Really to Blame for the High Cost of Cancer Care?

(Photo By BSIP/UIG Via Getty Images) U.S. healthcare costs have been high for decades, outpacing other developed countries since at least the 1980s. But costs continue to rise, and that is causing many experts to ask why. Some people blame … Continue reading

The post Is Federal Policy Really to Blame for the High Cost of Cancer Care? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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