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07/14/2014

Med Student vs. Dr. Oz

Since my last post was about Dr. Oz I thought I may as well post an update: Benjamin Mazer, a medical student at the University of Rochester has introduced a policy to the Medical Society of the State of New York in an attempt to regulate the kinds of wild claims that Dr. Oz makes on his show. His proposal is to treat health claims… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Christian Vercler. Bookmark the permalink.

07/14/2014

Patient Modesty: Volume 67








 So with Volume 66 reaching some 170 postings, we should move on to this Volume 67.  What is special on starting this new Volume is the fact that Artiger  joined us in Volume 66.  Artiger is a male physician (surgeon) verified by the Medscape medical website, where we both participate, who has provided us  with the long-needed professional input and education from the outside of this blog.  It appears that those writing to this thread have found his comments of interest and has accepted his presence here.  I have no idea how long Artiger will stick around but as long as he decides to do so, I will find him most welcome as a significant contributor to the ongoing discussion.  Here is Artiger’s last posting from Volume 66. ..Maurice.

Misty, participating in this blog simply reinforced my current practice. I work on the assumption that everyone cares about modesty. If you’ll go back to my original comments (posted by Maurice on June 26 at 7:30am), you’ll see what I am thinking about during an examination or procedure. When discussing breast incisions with women, I tell them about where the scar will be, and my method of closure to achieve the best possible cosmetic outcome. Many of them tell me that they don’t care what it looks like, and I respond by telling them that I care what it looks like.

I certainly understand if a female patient wants to drive another 100 miles or more to see a female surgeon. Like I said, I’ve got plenty more here that come to see me because of the service and courtesy I provide, not to mention how quickly I get them in to see me or get their procedure scheduled. Some people care more about that than gender. As an example I may have already mentioned, in an area we used to live, my wife drove 100 miles (past 2 female OB/gyn’s) to see my best friend from medical school. Why? Because he gave her the best in care and service. I didn’t have to convince her, seeing him was her idea. Never bothered either of us in the slightest, even when we would go visit them socially or take trips with them.

Don, yes, discussing these issues and concerns are about half of the office visit. Although we don’t shave (we use clippers) we don’t remove any more hair than necessary, just enough to allow for a clear field for the proposed incision. As for catheters, that is always discussed ahead of time as well. Catheters are useful but they are not without their risks, and they are not to be taken lightly.

No, the referring providers usually don’t cover these things (they really wouldn’t have a clue where to begin, I’ll tell you candidly), as it’s not their place to do so. That is what the office visit with me is for. If they could discuss all these things adequately then they could just call and schedule the procedure. I have never felt comfortable doing it that way, but there are a lot of places where you can get a colonoscopy without ever meeting the person who will do it. That’s another part of my office visit that I feel is important…I want the patient to know me, who I am, what I look like, have all of their questions answered, and be comfortable with me as their surgeon.


Graphic:

Thom, Robert A.: Paré. Photograph. Britannica Online for Kids. Web. 14 July 2014.  
Ambroise Paré was a French army surgeon in the 1500s who invented compassionate ways to handle wounds and hemorrhages. The painting was done by Robert A. Thom in about 1954.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Maurice Bernstein, M.D.. Bookmark the permalink.

07/14/2014

Funerals – Posing the Dead as Living

I like the idea of remembering people as they were.  But this funeral posing also seems to feed into strong death-denying currents in our society.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/14/2014

New York’s Medical Marijuana Law May Just Be a Political Hoax?

<p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 22.399999618530273px;">On the very last day of the 2014 legislative session, the New York Senate passed “The Compassionate Care Act” (S.1682-A, Savino) approving the <a href="http://www.usatoday.com/story/news/nation/2014/06/20/ny-set-to-legalize-medical-marijuana-/11033195/">legalization of medical marijuana</a>.  The Assembly had previously passed a companion bill (A.6357-A, Gottfried). The Senate bill has been sent to Governor Cuomo for his signature. The governor endorsed the bill in the legislature, but as of July 4, 2014, has yet to sign it.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 22.399999618530273px;">New York medical marijuana proponents have been <a href="http://www.compassionatecareny.org">advocating</a> for the <a href="http://www.drugpolicy.org/new-york">availability of cannabis</a> for several years. Neighboring states Connecticut, New Jersey, and Vermont, and 18 other states and the District of Columbia currently allow medical marijuana. However, last minute compromise changes to the New York law will severely restrict access to medical cannabis. In fact, the limitations are so rigid that some might say the bill is a hallow shell, a sham, one designed to appear to allow medical marijuana yet really not. Regardless of how one feels about medical cannabis, to hype the public into believing that marijuana will be available for medical purposes and then establishing barriers to its accessibility that is a fraud. It would be unconscionable to raise the hopes of distressed patients, many suffering with chronic and painful conditions, only to see those hopes dashed.</p>
<p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 22.399999618530273px;"><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI’s online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>

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07/13/2014

Kentucky Judge to Decide on Hospital Treatment for Dead 2-Month Old Isaac Lopez

On Monday, July 14, Judge McKay Chauvin (Jefferson County Circuit Court, Kentucky) will determine whether Norton Healthcare and Kosair Children’s Hospital must continue organ-sustaining interventions for two-month-old Isaac Lopez.  His father is a…

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/13/2014

20th World Federation Conference of Right to Die Societies

Check out the schedule of events for the 20th World Federation Conference of Right to Die Societies in Chicago in September.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/12/2014

Safeguarding Our Stories, Our Selves

While having a “sit-down-family-meal” with a son and his family over the recent holiday weekend–something that happens far too infrequently in families today—our six-year-old grandson attempted to leave the table during the post-meal conversations but was restrained by his mother. “Conversations are boring,” was his frustrated response to his unpleasant imprisonment. His response brought to mind a similar attitude in another 10-year-old grandson who refuses… // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Susan Haack. Bookmark the permalink.

07/12/2014

International Conference on End of Life: Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice

Check out this amazing program, next month, for the International Conference on End of Life: Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/11/2014

How To Tell Someone That She Is Dying

Elizabeth’s breast cancer had already spread to her bones and was now invading lymph nodes in her right armpit, causing painful swelling that kept her up at night. Today, however, as she walked into her oncologist’s office, Elizabeth felt like … Continue reading

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07/11/2014

Multidisciplinary Members and Staff Reflect the Unique Field of Bioethics

At first glance legal scholars, doctors, philosophers, scientists, and engineers may not appear to have much in common; however, members of these professions make up the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission). For the past four years, since its first public meeting on July 8, 2010, the Bioethics Commission has been […]

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