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04/24/2016

Israel Stinson Brain Death Dispute Continues


Israel Stinson was declared dead by clinicians at Kaiser Permanente Roseville Medical Center.  But his parents, Jonee Fonseca and Nate Stinson, do not accept that diagnosis. 

They explained in a recent interview:  “Because of our faith we will wait for our son to wake up . . . It’s just something telling us, ‘Don’t give up.’” 

“And we won’t give up. God won’t give up. . . .  We’re hoping with God that something gives. Anything’s possible.”

Life Legal Defense Foundation (LLDF), got a one-week extension on a temporary restraining order mandating Kaiser to continue "treatment" to keep Israel’s condition stable, while the family seeks a second opinion.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

04/23/2016

Surgeon Recommends DNAR to Cover Up Error

An alarming $10 million lawsuit was just filed against the chief of vascular surgery at INOVA Fairfax Hospita.  Yeatts v. Mukherjee, No. 2016-05070.  

The complaint alleges that surgeon Dr. Dipankar Mukherjee operated on the wrong leg of his patient, Reginald M. Manning.  Further, the suit alleges that when Mukherjee realized he had operated on the wrong leg, he ended the surgery and added false entries in the records to cover it up."  

Mukherjee then counseled the family to agree to a DNAR plan as a “pretense to cover up the fact that he intentionally performed a wrong-leg sur­gery."

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

04/22/2016

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Examines Whether IRBs Hinder HIV Research with LGBT Youth

The dearth of HIV prevention research on LGBT individuals under 18 years of age is at least partially a result of conservative Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), according to new research by Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia … Continue reading

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04/22/2016

Questions About Using “Mosaic” Embryos in IVF

Bonnie Steinbock

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Susan Gilbert. Bookmark the permalink.

04/22/2016

More Coverage of Our Out-Of-Pocket Expenses Research

My colleagues and I have been doing lots of research lately on how physicians and patients discuss out-of-pocket expenses during clinic encounters. One of our recent publications has been getting lots of attention, with this being the latest example. I … Continue reading

The post More Coverage of Our Out-Of-Pocket Expenses Research appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

04/22/2016

Simon’s Law – Requiring Parental Consent for DNAR Orders

Both Kansas and Missouri are considering enacting Simon's Law.  This legislation would prohibit clinicians from placing DNAR orders on critically ill children without their parent's knowledge or consent.

KNOWLEDGE:  Prohibiting secrecy and covertness is a solidly defensible goal.  As a series of recent high profile UK court decisions explain, clinicians should not write DNAR orders without family knowledge.  

CONSENT:  But the Simon's Law legislation also requires clinicians to obtain parental consent.  I have called this sort of requirement a "red light" law.  And I have been critical of this approach.

But the father of the child for whom the law is named wrote a powerful newspaper letter.  Scott Crosier questions whether "medical professionals and institutions . . . are all-knowing and a better decision-maker than a parent or loved one. . . .  Do they really believe their medical acumen is so superior to a family’s love?"

CPR is not physiologically futile for a baby with Trisomy 18 or for other critically ill babies.  Therefore, the appropriateness of CPR is not a medical or scientific judgment.  It is a heavily value-laden judgment about whether CPR is worthwhile. 

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

04/21/2016

Public Attitudes about Gene Editing

A recent Perspective article in the New England Journal of Medicine summarizes the results of several public surveys about the acceptability of gene editing.  This summary, which is freely available to the general public online without a subscription, is worth a read.  I think it’s limited by the fact that most of the surveys listed are old.  Only two were done since 2014, and the... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

04/21/2016

Clarifying the Rules: No media in patient treatment areas

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In January, I wrote about the case of Mark Chanko, a patient run over by a truck whose death was recorded for a real-life medical show and was later viewed on television by his horrified widow who had never been asked for permission for the airing. Now a settlement with federal regulators announced today will forever tighten health privacy recording restrictions in the hospital. In short, to film patients in the hospital, you have to get their consent before recording, not after as has been the procedure for most real-life medical shows.

New York Presbyterian Hospital is paying $2.2 million in penalties to the U.S.…

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04/21/2016

Is It Rational for Breast Cancer Patients to Have Bilateral Mastectomies?

Warning: I am not writing about Angelina Jolie. I am not asking whether women like Jolie, with a strong family histories of breast cancer and known genetic mutations, should consider having bilateral mastectomies. Women like Jolie face extremely high lifetime … Continue reading

The post Is It Rational for Breast Cancer Patients to Have Bilateral Mastectomies? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

04/21/2016

Sometimes It Snows In April

Click on the title to link to "Sometimes It Snows In April," my favorite Prince song. A bioethics song. Lovely.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Stephen R. Latham, JD, PhD Yale. Bookmark the permalink.