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08/25/2015

How Much Sugar Is in Your Beverage?

Here’s a display from an elementary school science fair, cleverly showing how much sugar various beverages contain:

The post How Much Sugar Is in Your Beverage? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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08/25/2015

Original Art in the ICU [EOL in Art 106]

Judith Margolis created these "Panels" for Faraway Places, a project that placed original art made specifically for the Intensive Care Units of Hadassah Ein Kerem Hospital  in Jerusalem. 

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/25/2015

Canadian Medical Protective Association – End-of-Life Panel

The Canadian Medical Protective Association works to protect the professional integrity of physicians and promote safe medical care in Canada.  Its annual meeting starts tomorrow in Halifax.  

The meeting includes a session on "End-of-Life Care: Medical Legal Issues." 

Moderator: 

  • Mr. André Picard, Health reporter and columnist, The Globe and Mail

Panelists:

  • Dr. Douglas Grant, Registrar, College of Physicians and Surgeons of Nova Scotia
  • Dr. James Downar, Palliative care physician and intensivist, University Health Network
  • Mr. Eric van Wijlick, Senior policy advisor, Royal Dutch Medical Association
  • Mr. Domenic Crolla, Gowling Lafleur Henderson, CMPA General Counsel

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/25/2015

Reproducibility Project or Research Police?

<p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">One of the great things about scientific knowledge is that it is subject to confirmation or refutation by subsequent research. Science can be confirmed by other laboratories repeating the same studies and finding the same results. However this rarely occurs in the actual course of normally conducted science. In the course of doing science most scientists choose not to simply try to simply replicate the previous study. Rather they consider the findings in the previous study develop the next hypothesis and do a study to extend the findings. Now this seems to be changing.</span></p> <p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">In 2011 authors from Target Research, a component of Bayer Healthcare, published <a href="http://www.nature.com/nrd/journal/v10/n9/pdf/nrd3439-c1.pdf">correspondence in Nature</a> reported that surveys of their internal scientists found “that only in ~20–25% of the projects were the relevant published data completely in line with our in-house findings”. This figure has been widely quoted in the literature but has been transformed into only 20-25% of these research findings were reproducible. There are many problems with this statement and this argument. First it is predicated on the presumption that an appropriate standard for reproducibility is data being entirely “in line” with the work done by internal scientists at Bayer Healthcare. Moreover the studies at Bayer Healthcare, unlike the studies they sought to replicate, were not submitted to the scrutiny of external peer review. There is every reason to consider the possibilities that the fault lies with the replicating studies at Bayer or possibly they did not exactly replicate the studies. We are left to simply accept the word of Bayer without the normal standard of quality that derives from peer review.</p> <p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;"><strong>The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a</strong> </span><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;">Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>

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This entry was posted in Health Care, Research Ethics and tagged , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.

08/24/2015

Seeing the Horror

A video released by The Center for Medical Progress (CMP)  about Planned Parenthood included these words: “Some viewers may find this content disturbing.” It was to warn the viewer about the images of piled fetal body parts dumped from a bag by an abortion clinic worker. What might be most disturbing…and chilling…is not the body parts, but the casual and glib attitudes of the Planned Parenthood... // Read More »

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08/24/2015

The "Dark Side" of Medical Education?












It is rare that a medical journal would publish an essay by a physician anonymously which describes the "dark side of medicine" and perhaps including the "dark side" of medical education.  The article is in the August 18 2015 issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine 
and in an editorial  in the same issue, the following:

We hope that medical educators and others will use this essay as a jumping-off point for discussions that explore the reasons why physicians sometimes behave badly and brainstorm strategies for handling these ugly situations in real time. By shining a light on this dark side of the profession, we emphasize to physicians young and old that this behavior is unacceptable—we should not only refrain from personally acting in such a manner but also call out our colleagues who do. We all need the strength to act like the anesthesiologist in this story and call our colleagues “assholes” when that label is appropriate. We owe it to ourselves, to our profession, and especially to our patients. 

So this "dark side" can be said to also involves those of us in involved medical education such as myself.. Perhaps  medical educators are inadequately inspecting and controlling the content of the "hidden curriculum" being presented to medical students  and  not facilitating advice and support for those students and doctors who witness "dark behavior" to "speak up"  to the perpetrators but also to superiors in administration. 

By the way, if you want more, read the article in Better Health
an immediate response to the Annals essay.   ..Maurice.

Graphic: From Google Images and modified by me with ArtRage and Picasa3.


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Maurice Bernstein, M.D.. Bookmark the permalink.

08/24/2015

“One Shoe Can Change Your Life”*

by Jeanie Sauerland, BS, BSN, RN

I hate shopping for shoes – always have. Footwear was not the reason I chose nursing – but it sure made it nice, to be able to wear comfortable walking shoes without looking like you wore orthopedic shoes made for someone 90 years old. The world of white caps and starched uniforms disappeared long before I became a nurse. Even so, the shoes are still designed more for function than fashion: These are meant to be work shoes. I put them on at the beginning of the day to provide support as I move from patient to patient.…

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08/24/2015

View from the Head End [EOL in Art 105]

From  Steve Yentis, A View from the Head End: Medical Cartoons to Ease the Pain.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/24/2015

Do Not Leave Definition of Death Just to Doctors

Andy Ho lucidly explains how the definition of death is value-laden, synthesizing a lot of recent philosophical and medical literature.  The issue is more acute in Singapore, because organ donation is presumed and opt-out.   "They make a val...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/23/2015

Ohio bill would forbid abortion of Down Syndrome pregnancies

An interesting article in today’s New York Times, about an effort in Ohio to forbid abortions if the motive is to avoid having a child with Down Syndrome. Heather Bellegia-Ernst, a mother of a child with DS, notes that nine out of ten DS pregnancies are aborted (I think her facts are a bit skewed)and […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by denasdavis. Bookmark the permalink.