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03/24/2015

AALS Section on Disability Law Call for Papers/Presentations for 2016 Annual Meeting

The AALS Section on Disability Law issued the following call for papers and presentations for the 2016 AALS Annual Meeting to be held in New York, New York, January 6-9, 2016. Selected papers will be published in the Journal of Legal Medicine.

Program title
The Wounded Warrior Comes Home: Exploring the Impact of Disabled Veterans on Disability, Health, and Other Law and Policy.

Program Description
About a century ago, returning war veterans with disabilities had a profound impact on both cultural and legal attitudes toward disability, shifting us from the charitable model to the rehabilitation model. Today’s soldiers often survive injuries that would have been fatal in prior combat engagements, leaving them with even more significant physical impairments. There is also a growing understanding of the scope of mental impairments associated with military service. 

At the same time, disability has shifted from something personal to the individual that she or he must work to overcome, to something largely attributable to choices made by society, and we now recognize equal opportunity for individuals with disabilities is a matter of civil rights. Veterans with disabilities may once again play a significant role in shaping the future of disability rights law. In addition, in an era of changing norms regarding health care, veterans with disabilities may play a significant role in that context. Beyond those topics, veterans with disabilities may affect issues of criminal law, employee benefits law, and tax law, to name a few. 

This panel will explore the contemporary impact of veterans with disabilities on our law, including ways in which law and policy can be more responsive to the needs of these veterans and those with whom they interact, and how their unique status may help inform various normative conversations.

Paper/Presentation Requirements and Submission Instructions
Presentations and papers may address a wide spectrum of issues associated with the program topic, from macro or micro perspectives, and further may focus on historical foundations, present conditions, assessment of past or current corrective measures, and/or the analysis of necessary corrections or changes in law or public policy.
Selected papers will be published in the Journal of Legal Medicine, the legal journal of the American College of Legal Medicine. Papers must not have been published or accepted for publication elsewhere. Preference will be given to papers of 25,000 words or fewer.

Abstracts of proposed papers/presentations should be submitted to Cheryl L. Anderson, AALS Disability Law Section Chair, at cheryla@siu.edu no later than Monday, August 3, 2015. The officers of the Section on Disability Law will select two abstracts for presentations. Authors will be notified no later than August 24, 2015.

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03/24/2015

The High Price of Affordable Medicine

In the old days, blockbuster drugs were moderately expensive pills taken by hundreds of thousands of patients. Think blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes pills. But today, many blockbusters are designed to target much less common diseases, illnesses like multiple sclerosis … Continue reading

The post The High Price of Affordable Medicine appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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03/24/2015

Very Sick Children: Treatment at Any Cost?

The Royal College of Paediatrics and Child Health (RCPCH) has just published a new framework to help doctors make tough decisions on end of life care for children and young people.

The new framework sets out an ethical and legal framework for when it can be considered no longer in the best interests of the child to give life sustaining treatment.  Specifically, the framework provides three sets of circumstances when limiting treatment can be considered because it is no longer in the child’s best interests to continue:

  • When life is limited in quantity: If treatment is unable or unlikely to prolong life significantly it may not be in the child’s best interests to provide it
  • When life is limited in quality: This includes situations where treatment may be able to prolong life significantly but will not alleviate the burdens associated with illness or treatment itself
  • Informed competent refusal of treatment: An older child with extensive experience of illness may repeatedly and competently consent to the withdrawal or withholding of LST. In these circumstances, and where the child is supported by his or her parents and by the clinical team, there is no ethical obligation to provide LST.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

03/23/2015

A Right to Know?

As humans, we have a desire to know who we are and from where we come. Perhaps our reason for this desire is to learn our history, or to help determine our future. Perhaps we desire this knowledge to understand our current condition – be it a medical condition or simply curiosity. Whether this stems from a desire to better understand one’s own identity or... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Courtney Thiele. Bookmark the permalink.

03/23/2015

New Features Now Available at Bioethics.gov

The Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission) has added two new design features to its website, Bioethics.gov. The purpose of the new features is to make it even easier to use the website, which continues to grow as the Bioethics Commission produces new materials and conducts quarterly meetings. The new additions […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Alannah Kittle. Bookmark the permalink.

03/23/2015

Will Ariadne Lead Us Through the Maze of End-of-Life Healthcare?

Note: The Bioethics Program blog will be moving to its new home on April 1, 2015. Be sure to change your bookmarks to http://bioethics.uniongraduatecollege.edu/blog/   by Richard Koo, Bioethics Program Alum (MSBioethics 2011) and Adjunct Faculty About four years ago, Susan D. Block, M.D. posted a blog on Harvard Business Review’s website as part of a series of […]

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03/23/2015

Schiavo 10 Years Later (conference)

Coming up next month in Miami: "Schiavo: 10 Years Later" - at the Florida Bioethics Network and University of Miami 23rd Annual Bioethics Conference on April 17, 2015. Other sessions address  The Future of Hospital Ethics Committees Ethics,...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

03/22/2015

Rebuilding Trust

The Texas Tribune reported this week that legislators in Austin have proposed a bill that would forbid physicians from asking their patients about guns.  Joe Gibes has commented on this issue in this blog (“It’s Not Primarily About the Guns” on Sept. 12, 2014).  In Texas, this is set against the backdrop of Open Carry legislation, a change in rules for those licensed to carry... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Cody Chambers. Bookmark the permalink.

03/22/2015

Utah Bill Assures Coverage for Terminally Ill

Utah S.B. 271 has passed both houses of the state legislature.  It prohibits denial of coverage under a health benefit plan because of life expectancy or a terminal condition. The bill mandates that a health benefit plan may not deny coverag...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

03/21/2015

Pre-Implantation Genetic Diagnosis and Abortion

The predominant purpose of pre-implantation genetic diagnosis (PGD) is to select those embryos that are considered healthy or normal. This inevitably means that those that have a genetic abnormality are discarded. Foundational to how one responds to PGD will be their understanding of the personhood of the human embryo. Often, the ethical debate is approached from the assumption that human life at this stage of... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Sarah Abbey. Bookmark the permalink.