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11/11/2014

A Park Bench That Tells You You’re Fat?

Clearly we in the United States are not taking the obesity epidemic as seriously as the Russian government. We debate whether it is appropriate for the government to require restaurants to inform their customers about how many calories they are … Continue reading

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11/11/2014

Making a Case for Case Studies

<p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">In Peter D. Kramer’s New York Times piece published in the ‘Couch’ section on October 18, 2014 (</span><a style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;" href="http://opinionator.blogs.nytimes.com/2014/10/18/why-doctors-need-stories/">Why Doctors Need Stories</a><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">) he affirms the experience of learners, educators, and researchers in his arguments that a case vignette can provide a kind of instruction that cannot be duplicated by data collection alone. While we do still need evidence based material to assure safety and efficacy of treatments, the case study offers contextual material that makes the evidence come to life.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">As a Clinical Ethicist each clinical encounter is rich with substantive information that is part of an individual or family story intersecting with the healthcare setting. When invited to provide input, support, or recommendations in any given case, the most informative elements of any case are the story of the patient. What was before, what is now, and what the future may require is different for each patient, and I am often awed by the ‘before.’ The contextual landscape of each story is often where we come to understand the psychosocial factors that weigh heavily in how a patient, family, or community interacts with the healthcare community. Hard data is not as useful as hearing the story that belongs to the patient.</p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><strong style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px; color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>

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This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.

11/11/2014

Taiwan End-of-Life Policies Inflict Unwanted Pain & Torture

Doctor Chen Hsiu-tan of National Yangming University Hospital said after a legislative hearing Thursday that Taiwan needs to take stock of the pain its end of life policies are inflicting on the living and those being kept artificially alive. Patients...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/10/2014

Ruby Graupera-Cassimiro Survives 45 Minutes without Pulse

Ruby Graupera-Cassimiro, 40, went to Boca Raton Regional Hospital in Florida for a cesarean section on September 23. The surgery was uneventful and the baby was healthy, but Graupera-Cassimiro started to experience shortness of breath and doctors...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/10/2014

Ethics in Neonatology Symposium

Check out this program at the Yale Club of New York on December 5, 2014: "Ethics in Neonatology Symposium." The Ethics of Refusing a Parental Request for Treatment Mark R. Mercurio  Treating Newborns with Trisomy 13/18: Have Times Changed? ...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/10/2014

"Lethal Malformations" and Language of "Futility"

In the October 2014 Seminars in Neonatal and Fetal Medicine, Dominic Wilkinson and colleagues discuss some of the language that is used (misused) in the context of some severe congenital malformations:  "Ethical language and decision-making for pr...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/09/2014

Death – a New 5 Part Series on NPR

To the Best of Our Knowledge, a nationally syndicated radio show from Wisconsin Public Radio just started a five part series on Death.  

Death: The Reckoning
Did you hear? There's a death movement going on in America. After decades of sanitized death, with dying, funerals, burial and grief shielded from public view, some people are now working to make death a greater part of life. In this hour, we talk with experts about how to begin these difficult conversations, and how they can transform both the dying and the surviving.

Death: Exit Plan
We live much longer than we used to, thanks to medical advances, but what are the emotional and financial costs of extending the end of life?  In this hour, we talk with physicians and bioethicists about planning for more humane and less prolonged deaths, about how some doctors don't know how to talk with their patients about preparing for death, and about one family's story of working within Oregon's "Death with Dignity" law. Tune if for a discussion of “a good death” and the story of a pioneering psychiatrist who's using hallucinogens to ease the anxiety of terminally-ill cancer patients.

Death: The Last Moment
Resuscitation science is revolutionizing medical care and reviving people who are clinically dead. With proper care, people who suffer heart attacks and lose brain function–even for two hours — can be brought back to life with no brain damage. What has that revealed about the the medical, spiritual and psychological mysteries of death?  We’ll hear conflicting perspectives on the debate over near-death experiences. Do these extraordinary experiences reveal a transcendent reality, or are they simply the biochemical product of a brain that’s shutting down? Tune in for conversations about "conscious death," and how people are reclaiming the final moments of their lives.

Death: The Wake
hat does it mean to grieve well? "Griefwalker" Stephen Jenkinson says that many cultures have “deep and skilled practitioners of grief." In this hour, explore the pain and healing power of grief, and learn about burial and mourning rituals throughout history.  We'll also hear poignant personal stories from people whose jobs bring them into daily contact with death, from a woman who worked for nine years in an inner-city funeral home, to a Ghanaian man who creates “fantasy coffins.”

Death: The Afterlife
Is death what gives life meaning? Looking at the prominence of death and the afterlife in so many religions, you might think so. But for millennia, people have also dreamed about immortality, and now transhumanists are actively trying to extend life by merging our bodies with machines.  In this hour, we explore the philosophical and religious dimensions of mortality and the afterlife. We talk about the art and poetry of remembrance, and now that much of our lives are lived on-line, how do we plan for our digital afterlives?

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/09/2014

Six Key Themes on Life-Sustaining Treatment Decisions from Australian Jurisprudence

In the Medical Journal of Australia, check out "Withholding and withdrawing life-sustaining treatment in a patient's best interests: Australian judicial deliberations" by Lindy Willmott, Ben White, Malcolm K Smith and Dominic J C Wilkinson.   The...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/08/2014

World Association for Medical Law – 21st Annual Congress

The 21st Annual World Association for Medical Law Congress will take place in Coimbra, Portugal.   The Congress will commence with a Welcome Reception Sunday evening August 2, 2015, and will conclude Thursday, August 6, 2015 followed by a Gala Di...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

11/07/2014

Kaci Hickox: Public health and the politics of fear

Steven H Miles, M.D.

Kaci Hickox is a nurse who went to Sierra Leone with Doctors without borders to treat the emergency with Ebola. She is professionally brave, articulate and well trained. Sierra Leone, with 5000 cases, is one the epicenters of the Ebola epidemic.[1] [2] She was last exposed to patient care on October 21.[3] On Friday October 24, she returned to the United States, entering at Newark International Airport in New Jersey. There she was met by a disorganized set of officials who tried to determine what to do with her. She was repeatedly interviewed. Her temperature on arrival was normal but was repeated several times using a forehead scan thermometer, which will give falsely high readings of persons under stress.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Public Health and tagged . Posted by Steven Miles. Bookmark the permalink.