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08/23/2015

Prescription for Medical Students: A Day at the Art Museum? [EOL in Art 104]

A study just published in NEUROLOGY (abstract here) shows a new way to help medical students learn about dementia - at the art museum.  "A day at the museum might be a wise prescription for helping students become compassionate doctors and g...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/23/2015

Futility Dispute – Mary Jane Pierce v. B.C. Women’s Hospital

In April, Mary Jane Pierce was born prematurely at 25 weeks with serious health problems. She has cerebral palsy and has suffered multiple hemorrhages that damaged her brain.  Next month, a BC court will decide whether B.C. Wo...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/23/2015

600 Days of Death – Jahi McMath

DocBastard posts some good thoughts on brain death and the Jahi McMath case by Cory Franklin, a retired ICU physician from Cook County Hospital in Chicago.  Franklin had a shorter version of his remarks in the San Francisco Chronicle.

"Any time you have a diagnosis with an outlier, it’s a good idea to review your original assumptions. In this case our assumptions about what brain death actually is."

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/22/2015

Stop Futile Treatment – Be Surgeons, Not Sissies

At a recent panel discussion on geriatric medicine at Westmead Hospital (in Sydney) several leading specialists agreed doctors should be “surgeons not sissies” and objectively evaluate the prospects of successful treatment.

One surgeon, Henry Pleass, remarked:  “I work quite closely with physicians in renal transplantation and I’m amazed sometimes these people are still being dialysed. . . .  I think: ‘Why on earth are they doing that?’ because they are dialysing a corpse, so to speak."

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/22/2015

Music Thanatology [EOL in Art 103]

Check out this NYT article on music thanatology.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/22/2015

The Private as Public: What it Means for Bioethics

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Today I was sitting in an outdoor coffee house and listened to the sounds around me. I heard the jackhammer from the street construction and the beep of a truck backing up. There was the gentleman working on his computer at the next table, playing music from his cell phone, out loud for everyone to hear. There were two women behind me (one actually moved so that she was next to me) speaking in very loud voices while one was convincing the other to use her as a web designer (and complaining about their boyfriends). There was a group of people who had brought in food from elsewhere to sit in this outdoor space and not purchasing any items from the business where they sat: They ate, placed their feet on the furniture and smoked.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Media, Privacy and tagged . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

08/21/2015

Man Experiencing First Real Moment of Peace in Years Resuscitated

The Onion is so funny, because it is so true.

"Interrupting the only moment of genuine peace the man had known in several decades, a team of paramedics reportedly resuscitated area resident Alan Taborsky this morning following an apparent cardiac arrest."

"Reports indicated that just as Taborsky had reached a state of complete relaxation in which he felt unburdened by his life’s troubles for the first time in recent memory, medical technicians wrenched him back into consciousness with a pair of defibrillator pads."


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

08/21/2015

Humane Endeavor

From the Division of Medical Humanities Newsletter: An interview with Atul Gawande touches on medical error and fallibility, healthcare reform, the joys of reading, and how his research on end-of-life care made him a better doctor. continue reading at...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Stacy Bodziak. Bookmark the permalink.

08/21/2015

Is the Government Trying to Make Us Fat?

The FDA has proposed new labels on grocery store food products, that adjust serving sizes to more accurately capture what Americans eat. Research I conducted with Steven Dallas and Peggy Liu suggests these labels could be a problem. Here is … Continue reading

The post Is the Government Trying to Make Us Fat? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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08/21/2015

Some Reflections On Summer Vacation Reading

<p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">I love to read novels and works of non-fiction in concentrated sittings so I can really lose myself in what I am reading. Because I am so busy during the course of my work-a-day professional life I rarely have such luxury. This is why vacation for me means a time when I can find a few really interesting books on my reading list and just devour them. Having recently returned from vacation and being overdue for my AMBI Blog, I thought I would share a few thoughts on my vacation reading, and even see if there is a lesson for bioethics.</p> <p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">This summer my reading was unusual in that it was all non-fiction, which included “The Return of George Washington” by Edward J. Larson, “The Warmth of Other Suns” by Isabel Wilkerson, and “Between the World and Me” by Ta-Nehisi Coates. I really didn’t plan to be reading these books together. But as it turns out, after finishing all three, I found a theme of interesting, often disturbing, questions about the past and present treatment of African Americans in the United States—questions that challenge the moral foundation and integrity of American democracy from its origins to the present.</span></p> <p style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><strong>The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a</strong> </span><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.