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07/18/2015

The Courtroom [EOL in Art 68]

Elizabeth Layton - THE COURTROOM - 1990

“The sign on the door to the courtroom says, KEEP OUT. The doctors, nurses, and family are not allowed in. The comatose patient on the consultation table has a funnel leading directly into her stomach. Black-robed Justices pour in nutritious foods - artificial grapes, fish, oats, peanut butter, pure H2O, 7-Up. The 25-watt light bulb symbolizes the dim illumination perfect strangers might have on the case.”


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/18/2015

Jahi McMath Family Still Denies She Is Dead

In ongoing medical malpractice litigation over the treatment of Jahi McMath, the healthcare defendants have inferred (from the complaint) that the McMath family contends she is still alive.  In their Case Management Statement filed a few day...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2015

Revolutionary Change for Life’s Final Choices Would Reduce Unwanted Care

This new article in Modern Healthcare provides a nice overview of major advance care planning developments:  Bud Hammes program at Gunderson Lutheran Pat Bomba's program at Excellus Blue Cross New Medicare coverage rules

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/17/2015

Who Was All Becomes Nobody [EOL in Art 67]

My series of "end-of-life in art" has depicted death from many past centuries.  Here is a more modern depiction from Pasha 183's street art.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2015

Dr. Gerald Koocher’s Response: Comments on the Hoffman report

In response to an invitation to reply to the recent blog post by Steven Miles, Dr. Gerald Koocher sent the following attached document.  Click to view Dr. Koocher and Dr. Levant’s comments on the Hoffman report.…

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This entry was posted in Uncategorized and tagged , , . Posted by Bela Fishbeyn. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2015

Planned Parenthood, Tissue Donation, and American Politics: A Call to Separate the Debate in the Media

by Macey L. Henderson, JD and Brianna L. Doby

The controversy over Planned Parenthood seems to be as old as time in American politics, but now the public perception of donated tissue for medical research might be at stake. Most recently, a video surfaced alleging to show the Senior Director of Medical Services for Planned Parenthood engaging in what appears to be the buying and selling of tissue from fetuses to a start-up biotech firm. Let’s be clear: This is not the first attack on Planned Parenthood, nor will it be the last. However, this undercover investigative effort by the somewhat mysterious scientific Center for Medical Progress is a ripe opportunity to get the facts straight about the reality and current practice of donated tissue for research or transplantation in the United States.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Reproductive Medicine and tagged , , . Posted by Macey Henderson. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2015

Art about Death Makes People Think [EOL in Art 66]

In the "Seventh Seal" Ingmar Bergman references memento mori through the church painter who seems preoccupied with painting "reminders of death."  When asked about his fixation on painting morbid subject matter, the church painter explains that h...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2015

Ned Cassem and the MGH Optimum Care Committee

Ned Cassem died earlier this month.  Back in 1973, he set up the Massachusetts  General Hospital Optimum Care Committee, one of the first ethics consultation committees in North America.  He led the committee for 34 years.   T...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

07/16/2015

On the Origins of Research Ethics: China and the West

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D

When I was a graduate student, I was fortunate to be one of five students chosen by the China Medical Board to attend an international bioethics conference between the U.S. and China in Beijing. We listened to talks on the philosophical bases of ethics in each country and culture. The U.S. laid its philosophical history on the doorsteps of the ancient Greek traditions such as Plato and Aristotle as well as later European thinkers such as Kant, Mill, and Bentham. The Chinese delegates talked of Confucius and Lao Tzu. We toured a hospital and a medical school.…

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07/15/2015

Medicare Considers the Value of Advance Care Planning

<p><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Last week the Centers for Medicaid and Medicare <a href="http://www.huffingtonpost.com/2015/07/08/medicare-end-of-life-counseling_n_7757036.html">announced a proposal</a> that would provide Medicare reimbursement for providers to spend time with patients discussing advance care planning. </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Though some have argued that this process will carry an inherent bias toward non-treatment, the purpose of such conversations is to seek direction from patients about preferences, values, and expectations should they lose the ability to <a href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/07/09/health/medicare-proposes-paying-doctors-for-end-of-life-counseling.html?_r=2">express these things for themselves</a>.</span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> While many persons who articulate their treatment preferences indicate the desire to forego aggressive intervention, this is hardly unanimous. There are plenty of folks who want all possible treatment offered to sustain life. The point of having discussions with healthcare providers is to determine what any given individual prefers.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Acute care providers have long been left with challenging dilemmas when patients are unable to communicate their healthcare goals, and the default is to treat and often treat aggressively. When a patient arrives to an acute care setting with documentation of preferences for treatment, interventions and goals can be set based on the individual’s prior wishes – whether this is to sustain life using any possible technology, or to allow a natural, uninterrupted dying process. The default of treating when there is any doubt will not change, but the opportunities for patients to discuss and document their own preferences will be enhanced with this legislative support. Providing muscle in the form of funding for these important conversations will only encourage more of a good thing. </span></p> <p><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><strong>The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a</strong> </span><strong style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px; color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>

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