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02/06/2018

Citizenship, Surrogacy and the Power of ART

A recent LA Times article by Alene Tchekmedyian explores a complicated case involving birthright citizenship, surrogacy and same-sex marriage. Briefly, a California man, Andrew Banks, married an Israeli man, Elad Dvash, in 2010. At the time, same-sex marriage was not legal in the US leaving Elad unable to acquire a green card for residency (via the marriage) so the couple moved to Canada where Andrew... // Read More »

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02/05/2018

I, My Love, and Apps

This blog is a post of an editorial in the February 2018 issue of the American Journal of Bioethics. You can access the issue’s table of contents here.

I, My Love, and Apps
by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In this issue, Danaher, Nyholm, and Earp offer a thorough analysis of the quantified self movement as applied to relationships. Quantification is a trend toward charting, coding, and recording our everyday activities. Think of activity trackers that record your number of steps, sedentary time, even the amount of sleep you get. Now apply that same concept to your relationship and even your performance in the bedroom.…

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This entry was posted in Editorial-AJOB, Featured Posts, Informed Consent, Justice and tagged , . Posted by Craig Klugman. Bookmark the permalink.

02/05/2018

Overcoming Uncertainty through Experience

By Michelle Sergi Coming out of my first year of medical school I struggled with my sense of confidence.  After endless nights of studying, a multitude of experiences at our Clinical Training and Assessment Center, and specialized clinical experiences, I felt that I could take on the challenge of counseling patients.  On the other hand, […]

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02/05/2018

President Trump:Diagnosis and, if Necessary Therapy: Doing it Ethically









An excellent article written by physician-ethicist  Joseph J. Fins in Harvard Medical  School Bioethics Journal  and it is my reading that he suggests when it comes to the psychiatric fitness of Donald Trump to be the United States President, it should not be a psychiatric diagnosis (such as "sociopathy")  from afar but should be the education of the public in a clinical non-partisan fashion  by the psychiatrists of the symptoms of disease and it will be the public and their government to prescribe and carry out the appropriate treatment. 


In Dr. Fin's words:


In the context of the president’s personality, it is not an outright diagnosis that is needed per se but a public appreciation of what sociopathy is that can help inform a response. Medical diagnosis demands a high evidentiary standard. In the public sphere, mere knowledge of what sociopathy entails may enable the requisite scientific literacy for the citizenry to decide if observed behaviors fit a discernable pattern of psychiatric diagnosis that has a bearing on an ability to govern. This knowledge is especially important in sociopathy, which by its nature can obscure and seduce the observer. Human nature is drawn to sociopathy and vulnerable to its charm. Public awareness of sociopathy’s existence and nature is thus vital to deliberative democracy. This knowledge becomes a component of basic scientific literacy for deliberative democracy. Having said this, this knowledge need not require understanding at the level of clinical nosology. It may constitute essential knowledge like the germ theory of disease: even if they can not diagnostically distinguish an errant gastroenteritis caused by E. Coli or Salmonella, the public knows enough to engage in personal hygiene and perhaps avoid potato salads simmering in the sun at a summer picnic. Public knowledge about sociopathy has a similar utility: it can help guide behaviors and inform responses by our political leaders and journalists in the Fourth Estate as they do their work. 




So read the entire but brief article  and return with your idea of the role, if any, for the psychiatrists in relation to the American public with regard to President Trump.  Remember, this thread is not about presidential policies but about how to make a psychiatric diagnosis and who should be supervising any treatment.  ..Maurice.

GRAPHIC: From Google Images

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Maurice Bernstein, M.D.. Bookmark the permalink.

02/05/2018

Larry Nassar and Medicine’s Duty of Self-Regulation

by Tyler S. Gibb, JD, PhD

Many news organizations have documented the horrific details of the crimes Larry Nassar, the disgraced former MSU and USGA gymnastic physician, committed against women and children over the course of his career (see, e.g., Indianapolis Star, Detroit Free Press, the New York Times, ESPN, and many more). I will not recount his crimes here but instead will focus on how he was permitted regular, unsupervised, intimate contact with so many victims, some children as young as 6 years old, even after victims complained about his actions.

…Because he was a physician.…

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This entry was posted in Featured Posts, Justice, professional ethics and tagged , , . Posted by Tyler Gibb. Bookmark the permalink.

02/05/2018

They didn’t choose brain damage

As we say goodbye to another NFL season, the inevitable stories about the devastating effects of CTE appear, showing the devastation that America’s favorite sport takes on its players. In a recent New York Times opinion piece, Emily Kelly, wife of former NFL player Rob Kelly, tells the story of her husband’s struggles since his retirement. What makes Kelly’s story interesting is that it addresses... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Neil Skjoldal. Bookmark the permalink.

02/05/2018

Veterinary Medical Ethics Committee – First-of-Its-Kind

As with human medicine, advances in veterinary technology provide pet owners with an ever-increasing array of treatment options for their pets. However, more options can lead to complex situations and difficult questions about care goals and quality of...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/04/2018

VIII International Symposium on Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness

The big 50th anniversary of brain death conference is at Harvard, April 11-13, 2018. In Havana, Cuba, December 4-7, 2018, is the VIII International Symposium on Brain Death and Disorders of Consciousness. American Scholars can legally attend this...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

02/04/2018

Patient Modesty: Volume 84

Currently on a bioethics listserv to which I read and contribute there is a discussion about policies within the healthcare system which attempt to protect the participants of the medical institution from demands of patients with regard to race and eth...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Maurice Bernstein, M.D.. Bookmark the permalink.

02/03/2018

Race On The Brain: What Implicit Bias Gets Wrong About The Struggle For Racial Justice

What do we risk when we seek the simplicity of a technological diagnosis—and solution—for racism? What do we miss when we locate racism in our biology and our brains rather than in our history and our social practices? 

This February 16 morning lecture and discussion surrounds the new book by Mitchell Hamline School of Law Professor Jonathan Kahn, Race on the Brain: What Implicit Bias Gets Wrong About the Struggle for Racial Justice. 

Join Professor Kahn as he discusses the concept of implicit bias and the implications that surround the societal awakening to this idea. Participants will have an opportunity to ask questions and share stories following Professor Kahn’s presentation.


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.