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03/17/2017

Equipoise and Caution Regarding “Ethical” Stem-Cell Therapy

You may have seen one of the many news reports this week about an “adult” stem cell treatment gone bad.  In it, doctors, not working in regulated industry or in the bounds of a clinical trial, injected stem cells derived from a person’s fatty tissue into the eyeballs of three people in an attempt to treat a vision-destroying condition called macular degeneration—and all three lost... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care, Stem Cells and tagged , , . Posted by Jon Holmlund. Bookmark the permalink.

03/17/2017

Ethics of the Trump Budget: The Social Contract is Dead

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

President Trump released his blueprint for a 2018 federal budget. From an ethical standpoint, the President seems to operates from a Hobbesian standpoint—life is nasty, brutish and short. However, unlike Hobbes who believed that we came together to protect ourselves from this reality, the new budget seems to encourage this idea. The new budget makes deep cuts to all social and scientific programs while boosting the military. In Hobbesian terms, Trumps’ social contract is all about bullying outsiders while leaving insiders in a state of hopeless diffidence.

Since World War II, the United States has invested heavily in science and technology, developing transportation, and building a better world (and winning wars).…

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03/16/2017

Losing Parties at Ontario CCB Retaliate through Medical Board Complaints

A few days ago, the Health Professions Appeal and Review Board affirmed a decision of the College of Physicians and Surgeons of Ontario not to take action against a physician.   I was pleased to see this result, because the complaint concerned ac...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/15/2017

How private should genetic information be?

One of the issues regarding genetic testing is the privacy of that information. It has been recognized for some time that employers and others could use genetic information in ways that would cause problems for those whose genetic information they were able to access. Because of that the federal Genetic Information Nondiscrimination Act (GINA) and the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) prohibit employers from asking... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Genetics, Health Care and tagged . Posted by Steve Phillips. Bookmark the permalink.

03/15/2017

7th Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference

The Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Workgroup and the WMU Homer Stryker MD School of Medicine Program in Medical Ethics, Humanities & Law is proud to announce the 7th Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference

September 14-15, 2017

Kalamazoo, Michigan

Overview:  Proponents of medical humanities contend that the humanistic dimensions of medicine and health are a critical component of those disciplines; not only do these dimensions help us to understand the very nature of medicine and health, their apprehension allows caregivers to relate to their patients, to treat those patients with respect and dignity, and to provide more holistic and empathetic care. 


The 7th Annual Western Michigan University Medical Humanities Conference is committed to the creative, dynamic, interdisciplinary explorations of the range of themes within the broad theme of medical humanities. This highly interdisciplinary conference draws participants from a wide range of backgrounds, including those from academic, creative, and medical communities.


Keynotes: This year’s conference Keynote speakers will be Dr. Jay Baruch and Professor Katie Watson.


AbstractsAbstracts will be considered in the following categories:

  • Oral Presentations: 20 minute presentations by one or two authors
  • Panel discussions: 60 minute presentations by a panel of speakers (generally 3-5). Panel discussions are expected to be interdisciplinary and explore a single topic from multiple perspectives.
  • Workshops: 60-90 minute presentations with a focus on audience interaction and the creation of some artwork. Previous successful workshops have included mentored drawing, poetry writing, performance dance, etc.
  • Posters/Visual Arts: Displays of visual arts, and performances (including dance, musical, theatre, etc.) are welcome.

Submission Guidelines: Submissions should include name, departmental/institutional affiliation, project title, and an abstract not to exceed 500 words. Proposals should be submitted electronically by April 1 in either .doc/.docx or .pdf format to medical-humanities@wmich.edu. Please indicate which theme the abstract falls under (e.g., philosophy/ethics, clinical practice, religion, conceptual or empirical research, performance/visual arts, history, etc.) Accepted presentations will be notified by May 1; conference registration will be required of all presenters.

New this year, there will be special sessions dedicated to graduate and undergraduate student presentations, with prizes available for exceptional presentations.


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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/14/2017

What are the Ethics of Avoidance?

Mark McQuain, in his February 21st blog post, discussed an interesting article which proposed that ethical decisions be made by robots. Although the author’s specific arguments invite numerous responses, underneath these arguments lies the question: why does modern man spend such effort to use technology to rid himself of yet another intrinsic function of his existence? It seems to me that this wish to pass... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Tom Garigan. Bookmark the permalink.

03/14/2017

De-stigmatization of the disgraceful mark of stigma in the opioid crisis

After attending Albany Government Law Review’s symposium, Script to Street: Opioids and the Law in the Capital District this past Thursday, there was several issues addressed but the one overarching concern was about the role of stigma in this opioid crisis. Many different types of stigma were identified and the different ways our negative judgments have impacted society. As one speaker during the first panel discussion stated, addiction is not a new problem. He described one historic painting that showed different reactions of society to addiction: disgust, numbness, shock, or simply ignoring the problem. All of these reactions illustrate stigma and shows how despite all our social advancements, we still have not eliminated (or destigmatized) stigma of the addiction problem. 

Some definitions of stigma include a mark of disgrace, society disapproval of something, or a negative set of beliefs society has about something.  All definitions include this perceived negativity and describe stigma as bad. Stigma is not something one like to face and usually, a judgment one tends to try avoiding. 

The issue with stigma our current opioid crisis is that it is not just one type of stigma, it is layers of stigma on top of one another. There is the stigma of being a drug user and the stereotypes of who is a drug user (the poor, African American, Hispanic). Drug-users are perceived to be “bad” people who only care about drugs.  This perception becomes a barrier to treatment as individuals do not want to seek treatment in fears they will be labeled as a drug user, even if these individuals are suffering from chronic pain. There is a list of characteristic behaviors of a drug-seeker based on our own judgments, even though there is a consensus that these behaviors do not accurately capture or describe drug-users. There is also the stigma of that those who are using mediated assisted treatment as still drug-users and that this medication is just going to back into the illegal drug market.  This goes into the ethical debate of harm reductionist approaches and whether this still violates non-maleficence. There is the stigma that physicians face for their role in prescription opioids and the stigma methadone clinics face. One physician speaker described the negative reactions of other business when she opened her clinic in a business area.  She was told her clinic was not in the right part of town, asked to leave, and her neighboring businesses were concerned about the type of people her clinic would treat.  There is the stigma of being mentally ill for those individuals who have a dual diagnosis or misdiagnosis of mental illness along with drug addiction.  There is the stigma of a felony for those individuals who only can get treatment through drug court.  With all these negative judgments that one person can face, it is no surprise that drug-users wish to remain unknown. 

Stigma is an ethical concern because it impacts how we treat each other in the clinical setting and in the public setting.  It impacts who gets care and how they receive that care. For example as the moderator, Professor Anthony Farley stated, when the stigma of this crisis was a "black problem," there was not the same amount of attention to this crisis as there is currently.  This racial-stigma blocked access to care. Yet, this crisis affects everyone and is not a “black problem.” Stigma influences patient autonomy, as it is an external influence that inhibits a patient’s expression of autonomy. Negative judgments are also not beneficent as stigmatized plans of care are realistically not in the patient's overall best interest.

Due to the potential negative impact of stigma in patient care, we ideally aim to eliminate it completely or reduce it. However, this may not be done. 

Societal stigma is so broad that we may not even see that it is happening. Assuming we can identity it, how then does one change someone else’s views even if it is negative or untrue about someone else? If it is a professional such as physician, we have regulations and codes of ethics to prevent judgments but what about on the broader public level? As one speaker suggested, one of the best ways to combat stigma is changing language and how we talk about addiction and drug-users. But if we can not eliminate it, the next best option is acknowledging the powerful impact these unnoticed perceptions. 

It was a powerful symposium where a diversity of professionals (lawyers, judges, nurses, physicians, and advocates) discussed our options in the opioid and heroine drug crisis. There is hope to have a follow-up meeting to continue these important conversations in order to come to a solution to address the opioid drug crisis and still treat legitimate pain needs. 


The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our website.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Bioethics Today. Bookmark the permalink.

03/14/2017

What’s a Nice Nurse like You doing in a Medical School?

Hearing the Call:  A Feature on How Physicians and Medical Educators Came to Understand their Vocation By Anne Gill Back in the 70’s, I called a surgeon to tell him his patient was bleeding from a cholecystectomy incision.  “When did you go to medical school?” he screamed.  “Until I say differently, that is serosanguineous fluid!” […]

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by reflectivemeded. Bookmark the permalink.

03/14/2017

Health Law at Mitchell Hamline Rises in Rankings Again

U.S. News & World Report has released its rankings of specialty programs ranked by faculty who teach in the field.  Mitchell Hamline rose from 12 to 11 for Health Law. 1.  St. Louis University 2.  University of Maryland 3.  Bos...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.

03/14/2017

Health Law at Mitchell Hamline Rises in Rankings Again

U.S. News & World Report has released its rankings of specialty programs ranked by faculty who teach in the field.  Mitchell Hamline rose from 12 to 11 for Health Law. 1.  St. Louis University 2.  University of Maryland 3.  Bos...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope, JD, PhD. Bookmark the permalink.