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02/21/2015

Bodies as Property vs. Bodies as Gift

This past week I had the privilege of hearing Dr. Daniel Sulmasy speak on the topic of bioethics in public policy, sharing in part about his experience with the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Problems. In the process of sharing, he made the striking statement that people do not own their genomes. This was later unpacked in the Q&A time where he emphasized... // Read More »

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , . Posted by Sarah Abbey. Bookmark the permalink.

02/21/2015

Clinicians Want Legal Certainty

I like this quote from the Minnesota Supreme Court:  “We sympathize with conscientious and dedicated physicians and health care professionals confronted almost daily with legal uncertainty in what, for them, is accepted medical practice.”  

When the court said this in 1989, Minnesota had not yet adopted a statute confirming that death can be determined by not only cardiopulmonary but also by neurological criteria.  But the same sentiment could be applied to all sorts of clinical situations.

Much of my own scholarship is animated by the same desire expressed by the Minnesota Supreme Court.  I want to provide more clarity, so that clinicians are not "chilled" from doing what they judge (or even know with certainty) is the medically and ethically appropriate course of action.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

02/20/2015

Thank you for treating me like a person

I went down with the resident to the emergency department to hear the patient’s story (aka “Take a history”) and perform a physical exam as part of the patient’s admission to the hospital. As we were getting ready to leave, the patient said, “Thank you for treating me like a person.” What does it say about our medical system when “treating someone like a person”... // Read More »

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02/20/2015

Brain Death Conference (Video)

It was a pleasure to be a part of "Brain Death" : Facilitating Family/Hospital Dialogue about Death by Neurological Criteria, a half-day conference last month in Los Angeles. The conference was sponsored by the SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA BIOETHICS COMMI...

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

02/20/2015

Q & A With Richard Thaler On What It Really Means To Be A “Nudge”

Nudge is one of the most important and influential books on behavioral science and public policy I’ve ever read. Co-authored by economist Richard Thaler and lawyer Cass Sunstein, the book lays out the rationale for adopting policies designed to make … Continue reading

The post Q & A With Richard Thaler On What It Really Means To Be A “Nudge” appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , , , , . Posted by Peter Ubel. Bookmark the permalink.

02/20/2015

GM Mosquitoes: Risks and Emotions

Gregory E. Kaebnick

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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged . Posted by Susan Gilbert. Bookmark the permalink.

02/20/2015

The Physician-Patient Relationship: The basis for moral clarity in clinical ethics

<p><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">It is my sense that the majority, perhaps the vast majority, of cases on which clinical ethics consultants (CECs) are asked to consult and make an ethics recommendation, there is, or would be, a general consensus on the part of the CECs about what counts as the appropriate recommendation. However, the question arises of how clinical ethics as a field should deal with issues that come up about which there is not a clear consensus, such as in cases where a basic right to have an autonomous choice respected by the patient is pitted over and against the obligation of the physician to do no harm—the traditional tension between respect for patient autonomy and beneficence/nonmaleficence. This tension or conflict often occurs in cases of alleged medical futility where the patient or the patient’s surrogate requests a treatment option the physician deems will only cause harm and no benefit to the patient. For example, consider a patient’s surrogate who insists that she will not consent to a DNR order and in fact expects the physician to perform CPR if the patient arrests. For a patient without capacity dying of metastatic disease, this directive by the surrogate presents a stark dilemma to the physician—is it a violation of the physician’s obligation to the patient to “do no harm” (nonmaleficence)? Or is respect for the patient’s wishes or her representative’s wishes so sacrosanct that the physician’s obligation to follow the patient’s wishes is paramount and outweighs the obligation to do no harm?</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> </span></p>

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This entry was posted in Clinical Ethics, Health Care and tagged , , , . Posted by Hayley Dittus-Doria. Bookmark the permalink.

02/20/2015

Mandated Disclosure of Medical Futility Policies

Following Michigan and several other states (see, for example, here and here), new Oregon legislation would require hospitals to disclose their medical futility policies.  

S.B. 524 provides in part:

"A health care facility that has a policy concerning the provision of life-sustaining procedures that are not likely to benefit a patient’s or resident’s medical condition shall make the policy available in writing. The facility must provide the written policy to any patient or resident who is admitted to the facility within 12 hours of the admission."




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This entry was posted in Health Care and tagged , . Posted by Thaddeus Mason Pope. Bookmark the permalink.

02/20/2015

What should docs do with parents who don’t vaccinate?

by Jenna Lillemoe, B.A.
by Arthur Caplan , Ph.D.

This year has marked the largest measles outbreak in decades with over 102 cases documented since December. This outbreak is a product of the anti-vaccination trend that has dramatically decreased vaccination compliance rates in children. Parents no longer follow the guidance of their pediatricians or believe the scientific evidence that vaccinations work without adverse effects. Pediatricians and family medicine physicians are then tasked with caring for these unvaccinated children. Because there is no set policy of how to manage caring for non-vaccinated children, we were interested in attempting to critically analyze how physicians manage non-vaccinated children.…

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This entry was posted in Cultural, Featured Posts, Pediatrics, Public Health and tagged . Posted by Arthur Caplan. Bookmark the permalink.

02/19/2015

The Carter v. Canada Conundrum: Next Steps for Implementing Physician Aid-in-Dying in Canada

by Sally Bean and Maxwell Smith (Bioethics Program Alum, 2010) We applaud the February 6, 2015 Supreme Court of Canada’s (SCC) unanimous ruling in Carter v. Canada (Attorney General), 2015 SCC 5. The Court found the criminal prohibition of assisted death to be in violation of section 7 of the Canadian Charter of Rights and Freedoms, which […]

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