Bioethics.net http://www.bioethics.net Where the World Finds Bioethics Wed, 30 Jul 2014 21:55:46 +0000 en-US hourly 1 http://wordpress.org/?v=3.8.3 Decision Aids for Advance Care Planning: An Overview of the State of the Science http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/OER-Z5nFmG4/decision-aids-for-advance-care-planning.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/OER-Z5nFmG4/decision-aids-for-advance-care-planning.html#comments Wed, 30 Jul 2014 13:16:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=2328f9d4f2dcabda5ddda2ca01b94026 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/8413792880357631472/comments/default 0 AIN’T JUST THE MEAT IT IS ALSO THE MOTION: CONSENT MATTERS! http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/%ef%bb%bfaint-just-the-meat-it-is-also-the-motion-consent-matters/ http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/%ef%bb%bfaint-just-the-meat-it-is-also-the-motion-consent-matters/#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 17:18:43 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?p=52141 “But look, you found the notice, didn’t you?”

“Yes,” said Arthur. “yes I did. It was on display in the bottom of a locked filing cabinet stuck in a disused lavatory with a sign on the door saying ‘Beware of the Leopard.’”

                           –Douglas Adams, The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy

Any apologia for Facebook’s recent behavioral study has to address one issue head on: that of informed consent. Informed consent is the bedrock upon which the ethics of all biomedical and behavioral research on humans rests.…

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The D.O. Is in Now http://www.bioethicsinternational.org/blog/2014/07/29/the-d-o-is-in-now/ http://www.bioethicsinternational.org/blog/2014/07/29/the-d-o-is-in-now/#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:59:42 +0000 http://www.bioethicsinternational.org/blog/?p=6737 http://www.bioethicsinternational.org/blog/2014/07/29/the-d-o-is-in-now/feed/ 0 New Educational Module on Informed Consent in Safeguarding Children http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/29/new-educational-module-on-informed-consent-in-safeguarding-children/ http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/29/new-educational-module-on-informed-consent-in-safeguarding-children/#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:37:27 +0000 http://blog.bioethics.gov/?p=1362 http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/29/new-educational-module-on-informed-consent-in-safeguarding-children/feed/ 0 New Educational Module on Informed Consent in Safeguarding Children http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/29/new-educational-module-on-informed-consent-in-safeguarding-children/ http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/29/new-educational-module-on-informed-consent-in-safeguarding-children/#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 15:37:27 +0000 http://blog.bioethics.gov/?p=1362 http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/29/new-educational-module-on-informed-consent-in-safeguarding-children/feed/ 0 Remote Control Birth Control http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/remote-control-birth-control http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/remote-control-birth-control#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 03:07:47 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=b5e6d10a1c5d17a0bcac0b6fce20cf0f http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/remote-control-birth-control/feed/ 0 EVERYTHING COMES FROM THE STREETS: Chicano Low Riders and Bioethics. http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2014/07/everything-comes-from-streets-chicano.html http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2014/07/everything-comes-from-streets-chicano.html#comments Tue, 29 Jul 2014 01:05:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=0a8deb9eae327c1ee4a07355686f5613
Last fall at the San Francisco Latino Film Festival there was a preview of the spectacular documentary, Everything Comes from the Streets. This film is an example of excellent programming on the part of that festival. This year the SF Latino Film Festival runs from September 12 - 22, 2014.

Everything Comes from the Streets is a documentary directed by Alberto Lopez Pulido and co-produced by Mr. Pulido, Kelly Whalen and Rigo Reyes.  It is a story about the significance of Low Riders in Chicano culture. A beautifully shot film, it carefully handles the struggle for identity and civil rights, particularly in the Chicano community. My interest in Low Rider Culture was re-ignited when it was used in the San Francisco based film La Mission (Bratt, 2009), which was the first film blogged on this website.

A Low Rider is both a car and the person who drives it. Low Riders, the cars, are rigged by the expertise of community developed mechanical physicists, operating under the cloak of local driveways and garages. Materials for the work historically come from salvage yards, not only deriving from cars, but the hydraulics of discarded airplanes. The rigging results in the rear of the car riding lower to the ground than the original factory specifications.  This aesthetic preference is also the restructuring that makes the car float, slowly down the roads, cruising on parade. This film illustrates why these vehicles need to be on parade. They are extraordinary pieces of artwork, expressing creative, cultural and engineering pride. There is more to this particular cultural icon than the cars themselves. 

Everything Comes from the Streets traces Low Riders from their roots in East Los Angeles and Espanola, New Mexico. The visual home of the film is San Diego County.  After the first Low Riders hit the streets in the 1950's, organizations began to spring up in support of them; the cars, the people who drove and their admirers.  These social "Car Clubs" developed structures that were also able to support community based social change. Additionally, the Low Rider movement had a specific contribution to Chicana feminism. By the 1970s, women, as well as men, were frequently involved in the same mechanics, redesign of their own vehicles for display, expression of creativity, pride, and organized community responsibilities. 

In the late 1970's, Chicano pride became a threat to the USA status quo. The film illustrated this reality in the San Diego area.  There, city ordinances were selectively enforced to prohibit Low Riders from Cruising and gathering audiences. This abuse of law violated the constitutional right of the Chicano community to peacefully assemble.  Collateral congestion and random legal offenses were inaccurately attributed to organized Car Club cruising. Low Rider Culture was misrepresented as synonymous with gang culture, particularly in the 1979 film, Boulevard Nights.  This representation fueled an even more skewed perception of Low Riders.

Disruption of under-resourced ethnic communities of color, under the guise of "urban renewal," was the norm in the 1960's and 1970's. Being organized, Car Clubs were logically part of community leadership that struggled, and still do struggle, against attempts to dilute Chicano identity and deny the community a geographic venue. With surprising good humor, Everything Comes from the Streets speaks to resisting oppression based on race and class. 

Why should Bioethicist care about Everything Comes from the Streets? The empirical Two Tiered Assessment of Shared Decisional Capacity reviews, Disclosure andBarriers to Disclosure during the process of informed consent, in medicine and clinical research. Clinicians should be aware of common barriers to shared decisional capacity. Examples of those barriers are: physical states including pain; psychological distress like grief, post-traumatic stress syndrome, depression/anxiety; educational differences (language and literacy) and patients’ perception of institutional chauvinisms. Institutional chauvinisms include the major "-isms."  Examples are ageism, sexism, genderism, classism, colonialism, professionalism and racism.  People tend to shut down communication and understanding when they recognize chauvinisms are being applied to them, with or without intention. 

Barriers to shared decisional capacity are barriers to good clinical medical ethical care of patients -- That's why Everything Comes from the Streets is important to Bioethicists. Once barriers are identified, clinicians can work to counter the negative effects.  In the case of institutional chauvinisms, clinicians demonstrating a commitment to learn about a person's family, spiritual needs, struggles and icons of culture, (FaSSI), may help to remove barriers to shared decisional capacity.   Born from the Chicano community, the film Everything Comes from the Streets is about family, spirit, struggle and cultural icons and can help improve goals of more ethical medical care.  
references:

Everything Comes from the Street directed by Alberto Lopez Pulido (2014) http://everythingcomesfromthestreets.vhx.tv/watch (USA) 56min  

LA MISSION. 35 mm. Directed by Peter Bratt. USA. Screen Media Ventures. 2010 (117 min)

September Williams'  Bioethics Screen Reflections: LA MISSION : Prototype for the Peace Genre http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2010/05/la-mission-prototype-for-peace-genre.html?spref=tw

Regarding Shared Decisional Capacity, FaSSI and institutional chauvanisms see online: Williams, September.  Pain Disparity: Assessment and Traditional Medicine in THE AMERICAN ACADEMY OF PAIN MEDICINE Textbook on Patient Management. 2012 Deer, T.R.; Leong, M.S.; Buvanendran, A.; Gordin, V.; Kim, P.S.; Panchal, S.J.; Ray, A.L. (Eds.) Springer SBN 978-1-4614-1559-6

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The End of End-of-Life Law http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/MqBCQ6uX9ZQ/the-end-of-end-of-life-law.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/MqBCQ6uX9ZQ/the-end-of-end-of-life-law.html#comments Mon, 28 Jul 2014 13:01:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=b25c903f7303a8b4aebae4bc8a97022f Check out this new article by UVA professor Lois Shepherd "The End of End-of-Life Law."

As the title suggests, Shepherd's article argues that questions about medical care at the end of life should be approached like other important questions about medical care—with consideration to patients’ wishes, values, interests, and relationships, and without special laws, special burdens of proof, or unique requirements for documentation. She contends that reducing legal distinctions between end-of-life decisions and other health care decisions can bring efficacious changes to both sorts of decision making processes.

The heart of the article is a "blueprint for reform" through the following eight general principles that should guide the law relating to all health care decisions, including those we now think of as end-of-life decisions.

  • Principle 1: Respect and Care for the Patient Require Balancing Rather Than Rigidly Prioritizing Among Patient Instructions, Wishes, Values, and Interests
  • Principle 2: All Patients Should Have a Surrogate Decision Maker, and the Same Standards of Decision Making Should Apply to All Surrogate Decision Makers
  • Principle 3: Requirements for Advance Documentation by Patients Should Be Minimal
  • Principle 4: Binding Pre-Commitments Should Be Allowed Only Sparingly and for Compelling Reasons; They Should Not Be Required or Encouraged
  • Principle 5: Rushed Decisions That People Do Not or Should Not Want to “Live Like That” Should Be Avoided
  • Principle 6: Communication About Health Care Decisions Should Be Encouraged but Not Scripted by Law
  • Principle 7: Appropriate Safeguards to Protect Patients with Diminished Capacity Are Needed
  • Principle 8: Relief of Pain and Suffering Should Always Be Permitted and Considered an Important Goal of Care


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New NINR Video Focuses on Preparing for the End of Life http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/DrE5vG58Ls8/new-ninr-video-focuses-on-preparing-for.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/DrE5vG58Ls8/new-ninr-video-focuses-on-preparing-for.html#comments Sun, 27 Jul 2014 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=13c522fb08a7bef60a482c288fe0e4b6 A new video, co-produced by the National Institute of Nursing Research seeks to help people by answering one of life’s most sensitive questions: how can a person best prepare for the end of life? 



Developed to highlight content from NINR’s recently released End of Life module, the video stresses the importance of learning about end of life care options, which focus on comfort and quality of life.

NINR Director Dr. Patricia A. Grady, the featured speaker in the video, explains “A person can best prepare for the end of life by becoming informed. So many of us have questions about death and dying but hesitate to ask them. Our module provides comprehensive information about the many issues that can arise at the end, from the physical, emotional, and mental symptoms associated with dying to more practical concerns, such as where to find end-of-life care.”   

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Following in the Errant Footsteps of the VA http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/iyJfW9j09Bo/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/iyJfW9j09Bo/#comments Sat, 26 Jul 2014 12:53:58 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5106 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/26/following-in-the-errant-footsteps-of-the-va/feed/ 0 Even after Tracey Decision, Unilateral & Covert DNR Orders Continue http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/3AWGBRSdyes/even-after-tracey-decision-unilateral.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/3AWGBRSdyes/even-after-tracey-decision-unilateral.html#comments Sat, 26 Jul 2014 00:23:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=dc0d9c599469625ba3abaf53a63343a1 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/3952592207229639328/comments/default 0 The upcoming debate over “CIRM 2”–CORRECTION http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/vAn2gcB1wko/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/vAn2gcB1wko/#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2014 21:33:56 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5101 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/24/the-upcoming-debate-over-cirm-2/feed/ 0 Presidential Bioethics Commission 101 http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/24/presidential-bioethics-commission-101/ http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/24/presidential-bioethics-commission-101/#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2014 15:30:23 +0000 http://blog.bioethics.gov/?p=1360 http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/24/presidential-bioethics-commission-101/feed/ 0 The Facebook Emotions Study http://researchethicsblog.com/2014/07/24/the-facebook-emotions-study/ http://researchethicsblog.com/2014/07/24/the-facebook-emotions-study/#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2014 13:37:57 +0000 http://researchethicsblog.com/?p=593 ]]> http://researchethicsblog.com/2014/07/24/the-facebook-emotions-study/feed/ 0 Care or Kickbacks? http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/care-or-kickbacks/ http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/care-or-kickbacks/#comments Thu, 24 Jul 2014 12:37:38 +0000 http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/?p=389 ]]> http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/2014/07/24/care-or-kickbacks/feed/ 0 THE LEGEND OF KORRA: BIOETHICS meets ANIME http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2014/07/the-legend-of-kora-bioethics-meets-anime_23.html http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2014/07/the-legend-of-kora-bioethics-meets-anime_23.html#comments Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:39:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=48499cd8683335869511a0aa8340283f The Legend of Korra is an anime, action, fantasy, steam punk comic drama series. Unlike live action film, it is difficult to understand who is the author of an animation. In live action film, the author is considered the director. Animation is a more collaborative process with a long list of creatives which tends to diversify the form. The Legend of Korra series is created by Bryan Konietzko and Michael Dante DiMartino who are also writers along with Bryan Konietzko and Tim Hedrick. The credits routinely list 4 directors and too many to count artist and voices. Blending of themes and form of production is an attribute reflected within this particular series. 

Avatar: The Legend of Ang (The Last Air Bender) which aired 2005-2008 was the forerunner of the Korra series. Many who started watching Avatar Ang are now in their twenties and remain devotees of the realm. The resurgence of a complex fantasy genre, expanded beyond the play of young children, may speak more about reality than the make believe worlds in constructs.

Korra appeals to people who are, or want to be, cross cultural. Fantasy is the activity of imagining things, especially things that are impossible or improbable. Fantasy is also closely linked to play. There seems to be a need for the play in creativity both in art and science. In order for the human mind to develop properly we know that children require play. In the past, children were less exposed to the harsh details of the “real world,” making it easier to figure out. The importance of play in the past may have been confined to developmental ages 2 to 10 years. However, the inundation of more complex exposures, ending childhood earlier, seem to have required more complex and prolonged play... I’m just sayin’. There is a resurgence of detailed fantasy story-lines in animation and in literature over the past twenty years. 
The Legend of Korra unfolds in a mythical world, at once futuristic and merging of ancient Asia, Inuit, and steam punk visuals. Characters are heterogeneous, including animals, spirits and human beings. The series deals with war and conflict. The strength to change conflict is dependent on diversity, the ability to be or do more than one thing. This is contrary to reality, which often focuses on singularity as a major attributes. In The Legend of Korra, Bison’s fly, people cross between worlds of spirit, human and the elements. Humans of this universe have psychokinetic capacity to merge with and animate the major elements, fire, water, earth and air.

Avatar Korra is a 17 year old girl, not male as is often more common in the fantasy genre. Girls and women have significant representation during critical points in the series. In Hindu, ‘Avatar’ loosely translates as an “incarnation of a higher being.”  There is only one Avatar on the earth at a time. Avatars are reincarnations of other Avatars. The power to psychokinetically bend (or move) all 4 major elements, Air, Fire, Water and Earth is the defining characteristic of an Avatar. They differ from other “benders” in the universe who generally only can move one of the elements, the one from the similarly named kingdom from which the person derives.  It is this synergistic bending of all elements, which empowers Avatar Korra to potential resolve universal conflicts and promote harmony. 

These Avatars differ from standard Super Heroes, say, of the Marvel or DC universe in other ways. Avatars are born children, not converted by science or tragedy. Avatars are well cared for by their families and communities, who are obligated to help them grow into their identities. Unlike Superman or Batman, they generally are not orphans, loners or hidden behind alternate identities. To learn to bend all 4 elements, Avatars must be trained by mentors. The most complex and cerebrally taxing bending is that of Air. In a real world, were children and adults are essentially latch key kids, the appeal of this fantasy is understandable. Korra is in training to bend air as the series opens. Villains are those who manipulate the elements for purposes other than peaceful. 

Persons born after 1985, are often referred to as the millennial generation, generation Y, or the fantasy generation. They watch screens for entertainment, information and socialization on a variety of devices. Screen narratives are currently watched at will and repetitively during much of their conscious lives. Television broadcast times are not retro but made archaic by technological access transcending confines of time and geography. Eighty-three percent of adults in the USA have cell phones, 35% of which are smart phones. Those who are Black and Latino reflect trends of higher usage and using their phones as their major source of Internet access and “watching.” This watching places people in realms other than realism continuously and simultaneous with the dwelling in the “real world.” That is to say technology allows parallel universes in the mind. 

There was a time in history where real dead people were not shown on screens amidst real wars. It may be that, reality is overrated in the minds development.” We still do not fully understand the positive power of immediate escape into fantasy on screen, but we do understand that it is important in early childhood.  In this time, when the evolution of brain capacity is being vastly accelerated, in ways which most schools are not designed to accommodate, one could argue that the current digital leap parallels speaking, counting and writing in its importance. It may be protective from the barrage of non-fantasy life dependent on the narrative line.

The task of Bioethicists is to seek the knowledge to understand the ‘good’ of screen fantasy because it is delivered by a ubiquitous technology. Its appeal well into generations of adulthood parallels unprecedented pressure to make sense painful realities. The question is how does screen fantasy improve coping for this generation? There must be a reason why so many are driven to “watch,” and particularly watch animation, and create it. 

The Legend of Korra blends humans with natural elements in the way that the born from Manga anime Ghost in a Shell creates cyborgs. The series minimalist sophistication indicates the need for more thought about the meanings of repetitive viewing and stimulation by animation. To do that, Bioethicist should consider watching viewing trends in The Legend of Korra. 

The Legend of Korra (television series) created by Bryan Konietzko and Michael Dante DiMartino ( 2012 - current) Nickelodeon Animation (33 episode: 24 minutes.) 

Williams, S. book review. Bioethics at the Movies by Sandra Shapshay. Journal of Bioethical Inquiry September 2010, Volume 7, Issue 3, pp 329-331

Ford, Paul J. in Bioethics at the Movie’s Existential Enhancement in Ghost in the Shell in Bioethics at the Movies by Sandra Shapshay. Baltimore : Johns Hopkins University Press, 2009.







Special thanks to Curd Williams-Hertz for flagging the Legend of Korra and Avatar: The Legend of Ang and the quote,” reality is over rated,” see curdwilliams-hertz.com
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Information technology and medicine http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/AclqE_ncnlg/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/AclqE_ncnlg/#comments Wed, 23 Jul 2014 15:23:16 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5098 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/23/information-technology-and-medicine/feed/ 0 Death & Medical Treatment – New Symposium http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/priqB3c-TbE/death-medical-treatment-new-symposium.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/priqB3c-TbE/death-medical-treatment-new-symposium.html#comments Wed, 23 Jul 2014 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=6dd2df84b8520631454ce427ca945b39 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/4510164881949927154/comments/default 0 Kim Teske – Compelling Story of VSED http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/PTHw0Wm5dgc/kim-teske-compelling-story-of-vsed.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/PTHw0Wm5dgc/kim-teske-compelling-story-of-vsed.html#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 12:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=70c6f624901689f5e3f41d2f1d1962e1 The Globe & Mail has a very extensive story on Kim Teske and her use of VSED to die on her own terms.




















Teske had Huntington’s, an incurable genetic disease that combines aspects of Parkinson’s, Alzheimer’s and schizophrenia. She feared that, if she did not act now, she will end her days in an institution with strangers pushing mush into her mouth and hosing her down after she defecates.  

So, Teske stopped eating and drinking. Around noon on day 12 of her fast, Teske died peacefully, with none of the delirium or agitation that some watchers had anticipated.

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What Is Ethics Doing? http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/what-is-ethics-doing http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/what-is-ethics-doing#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 10:07:51 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=befc9ed8a74ecc45c7362358269766dd http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/what-is-ethics-doing/feed/ 0 Wake Up to Dying Project http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/QtZHUCqBPRs/wake-up-to-dying-project.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/QtZHUCqBPRs/wake-up-to-dying-project.html#comments Tue, 22 Jul 2014 06:37:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=f92e1cb91b0140f2221cb1e914525a62 The Wake Up to Dying Project is an awareness and action campaign that encourages people to think and to talk about dying.  The organizers do this by gathering and sharing stories about death, dying, and life. They also do this through art and hands-on opportunities to explore these important subjects.

The organizers believe that if we consider this difficult subject more purposefully we will be more prepared, practically and emotionally, to face this shared human experience. We might find ourselves more willing to participate in the dying process of a loved one or a neighbor. We might even be less afraid to think about our own deaths.

One cool aspect of the Project is a traveling exhibit which will offer people a safe and engaging place to listen to personal stories about death, dying, and life.



Exhibit visitors will hear audio stories from over fifty individuals, including: (a) people who are dying, and their family members; (b) experts such as doctors, nurses, chaplains and those who work regularly with the dying; people with particular insights about the process of grieving a lost loved one.  The audio stories will be complemented by abstract video and contemplative hands-on activities.

The exhibit will be housed in a mobile unit that travels from community to community and stays in each location for five to ten days. By parking on ‘Main Street,’ we hope to encourage participation from a large cross section of a community.

When visitors leave the listening trailer they enter a tent where engagement opportunities are offered, including local volunteer work and community art projects. They will also be invited to record and share their own stories. The tent is designed to act as a community space for the duration of the exhibit, and will be offered to local organizations to host related workshops, trainings, panels, and films. 

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Facebook’s Emotion Experiment: Implications for Research Ethics http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=7002&blogid=140 http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=7002&blogid=140#comments Mon, 21 Jul 2014 14:54:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=edf73bf91b20b8f761d60f7f0773d392 Robert Klitzman and Paul S. Appelbaum]]> http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/facebooks-emotion-experiment-implications-for-research-ethics/feed/ 0 DALLAS BUYERS CLUB meets SCIENTIFIC INTEGRITY http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2014/07/dallas-buyers-club-meets-scientific_5424.html http://www.bioethicsscreenreflections.com/2014/07/dallas-buyers-club-meets-scientific_5424.html#comments Sun, 20 Jul 2014 20:24:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=6015456ee231fcefff0d30cd89b8062c
DALLAS BUYERS CLUB  is a biopic about an unlikely hero, directed by Québécois Jean-Marc Valle and written by Craig Borten and Melisa Wallack. In case you get a call from your local AIDS-Walk coordinator, remember 50,000 cases of AIDS (Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome) still occur in the USA annually. Transmission is largely preventable with education, testing and early intervention. Ethnic peoples of color are disproportionately affected in new cases. Thirty-five years ago, I never imagined AIDS would be the defining disease of my career and then some.  After my AIDS-Walk call, I pulled out my notes on Dallas Buyers Club, which screened October, 2013 at the Mill Valley Film Festival. It has won three Oscars and too many to count other awards.

The year 2013, brought a number of film releases with main characters who had significantly degenerate moral fiber. You know them, good acting, sex, drugs, brutality prominent but few redeeming qualities.  Dallas Buyers Club (DBC) is not one of those films. Its lead character is definitely a degenerate, but develops moral fiber.  If “The Star” of a film is the person who undergoes the most change, Ron Woodroof (Matthew McConaughey) may be the star of the millennium. His character moves from self-serving reprobate to enlightened self-interest. In the process, he believably expands compassion for others. The compassion fall-out includes Jared Leto, (Rayon) who well plays a stereotype of a transgender woman whose script, in contrast to Woodroof’s, traverses only the narrow ground between dying and dying more.


Dr. Eve Saks (Jennifer Gardner) spoke particularly to me. She had that deer in the headlights feel to her -- as she decided to which side of the road she would jump -- with her patients, or with her retrograde moving profession. Her subtle portrayal of an overwhelmed newbie was reminiscent of my internship at Cook County Hospital, Chicago in 1985.  I saw 17 hospitalized patients with AIDS, within my first 35 days. Fortunately, I had good role modeling by Drs. Ron Sable, Renslow Sherer and Dr. Jonathan Mann. 


Among those 17 patients was an 8 year old girl with Leukemia, AIDS and tuberculosis - the later was diagnosed on autopsy, which brings me to the bioethical point. Four years before that autopsy, I was told in medical school that miliary or disseminated tuberculosis no longer existed -- that was then, this was now.  Diseases change and so should the manner of treating and studying them and their cures.  In medicine it’s not “location, location,” but “observation, observation.”

DBC is about how AIDS, science, research and Federal Drug Administration regulations were forced to change. The change was pushed by the autonomy of people who ran the most risk of dying from AIDS and their allies.  The principle of justice requires equipoise or the equitable distribution of burdens and benefits.  The job of clinicians is to understand and communicate the burdens and benefits so that individuals, who can, are able to exercise their autonomy. When there is no proven cure, those with life threatening illnesses and intact decisional capacity, now, can choose through the informed consent process, to run the risks of clinical research protocols, whose outcomes are as yet unproven.  Access to such trials is currently a health disparity. Navigating the clauses in the three proceeding sentences is the job of bioethics in new diseases, therapies and research.  This is how we learned that oral anti-virals could reduce HIV/AIDS vertical transmission from mother to child. 

Data safety monitors (DSM), augment institutional review boards and were given teeth during the rise of the AIDS epidemic.  DSM allowed tracking of acceptable burdens associated with research, on vulnerable persons while the studies are in progress.  DSM also can stop studies where the burdens outweigh the benefits, or the benefit is so clear that lifesaving therapies should not be with-held to complete the research.  This acceptability should be consistent with the 2013 World Medical Association amended Declaration of Helsinki on Medical research. Significantly this amendment references identifiable human material or data. This would recognize the privacy of genomic material correcting ethical violations associated with HeLa cells and other genetic technologies. Consider, non-small-cell lung cancer, the most ubiquitous cancer in the world.  In that case, we look at the value of Palliative Care, genomic-bio-marker driven therapy and clinical trials, all three at once. The criteria for treatment look like a menu at an over stocked diner, but bioethics helps to navigate them.   Such protocols would not be possible without changes in policy and procedure reflected by the struggles of those affected by HIV/AIDS and the bioethical analysis accompanying them.

Set in 1985, the story is sandwiched between the year before AZT was found effective (the first of the anti-viral drugs used in HIV/AIDS) and the year after, Robert Gallo and Luc Montagnier both discovered HIV-1 as the agent causing AIDS.  The footprints of the Dallas Buyers Club are everywhere.

references:

Dallas Buyers Club (35mm) directed by Jean-Marc-Vallee (2013) Focus Features (USA) 116 min

Some other films about the HIV/AIDS epidemic:

How to Survive A Plague (35mm) David France (2012) Sundance theatrical/IFC (USA) 109min

Philadelphia(35mm) directed by Jonathan Demme (1993) Tri Star (USA) 125 min

Yesterday (35mm) directed by Darrell Roodt(2004)HBO USA ( South Africa) 96 min ( Zulu, English  subtitled)

The Declaration of Helsinki http://www.wma.net/en/30publications/10policies/b3/  accessed July 16, 2014 2013

HIV/AIDS statistics USA http://www.cdc.gov/hiv/statistics/basics/ataglance.html accessed July 16, 2014.

World Association of Bronchoscopy and Interventional Pulmonology Academy : Small Sample Tissue Acquisition and Processing for Diagnosis and Biomarker-driven Therapy of NSCLC. Bioethical issues video commentary. http://www.wabipacademy.com/site/webcast/clinicalstem1/step40
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Do Oregon and North Dakota Healthcare Surrogates Perform Better? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/0Ji0uKF5OGs/do-oregon-and-north-dakota-healthcare.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/0Ji0uKF5OGs/do-oregon-and-north-dakota-healthcare.html#comments Sun, 20 Jul 2014 02:39:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=e11a5fa76c059e8fd3f90bc9ecaa42ef http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/7201307440792355734/comments/default 0 Is complicity important in Hobby Lobby decision? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/DJgTLXVUPUE/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/DJgTLXVUPUE/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 19:22:54 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5091 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/18/complicity-and-hobby-lobby/feed/ 0 Safeguarding Children in Emergencies through Ethical Pediatric Research http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/18/safeguarding-children-in-emergencies-through-ethical-pediatric-research/ http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/18/safeguarding-children-in-emergencies-through-ethical-pediatric-research/#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 15:00:29 +0000 http://blog.bioethics.gov/?p=1357 http://blog.bioethics.gov/2014/07/18/safeguarding-children-in-emergencies-through-ethical-pediatric-research/feed/ 0 Pope Cited by NRLC before Senate Judiciary Committee http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/zQjUkQC0Rdo/pope-cited-by-nrlc-before-senate.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/zQjUkQC0Rdo/pope-cited-by-nrlc-before-senate.html#comments Fri, 18 Jul 2014 08:30:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=40eae27a1f373a9fe777c380b6ead861 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/8593926875789946832/comments/default 0 Great but “unaffordable” new drugs http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/Q34MIADif6E/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/Q34MIADif6E/#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 21:03:09 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5088 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/17/great-but-unaffordable-new-drugs/feed/ 0 Nature Isn’t What It Used To Be http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=6997&blogid=140 http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=6997&blogid=140#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 14:54:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=8641d15c6d29231bfea39ab2ff0332f5 http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/nature-isnt-what-it-used-to-be/feed/ 0 She Ain’t Heavy, She’s My Brother http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/2014/07/17/she-aint-heavy-shes-my-brother/ http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/2014/07/17/she-aint-heavy-shes-my-brother/#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 13:37:44 +0000 http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/?p=386 ]]> http://thebioethicsprogram.wordpress.com/2014/07/17/she-aint-heavy-shes-my-brother/feed/ 0 Only a Third Who Express a Preference to Die at Home, Actually Die at Home http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/1q6h0XElZO8/only-third-who-express-preference-to.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/1q6h0XElZO8/only-third-who-express-preference-to.html#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 12:15:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=d4c7a3bc428bc6e65e5db270ccef5721 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/7415326883297836327/comments/default 0 Rationing Is Not a Four-Letter Word http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/pAAXl7DCQDk/rationing-is-not-four-letter-word.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/pAAXl7DCQDk/rationing-is-not-four-letter-word.html#comments Thu, 17 Jul 2014 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=13c8db2f5d918455ca0b45dff9d37934 Philip M. Rosoff is a practicing physician and Professor of Pediatrics and Medicine at Duke University Medical Center, where he is also a member scholar of the Trent Center for Bioethics, Humanities, and History of Medicine, and Director of Clinical Ethics at Duke University Hospital.

He has just published Rationing Is Not a Four-Letter Word with MIT Press.  I like this book's thesis and explored it (a little) in some posts like "Top 10 North American Death Panels."

Here is the abstract:

Most people would agree that the healthcare system in the United States is a mess. Healthcare accounts for a larger percentage of gross domestic product in the United States than in any other industrialized nation, but health outcomes do not reflect this enormous investment. In this book, Philip Rosoff offers a provocative proposal for providing quality healthcare to all Americans and controlling the out-of-control costs that threaten the economy. He argues that rationing—often associated in the public’s mind with such negatives as unplugging ventilators, death panels, and socialized medicine—is not a dirty word. A comprehensive, centralized, and fair system of rationing is the best way to distribute the benefits of modern medicine equitably while achieving significant cost savings.
Rosoff points out that certain forms of rationing already exist when resources are scarce and demand high: the organ transplant system, for example, and the distribution of drugs during a shortage. He argues that if we incorporate certain key features from these systems, healthcare rationing would be fair—and acceptable politically. Rosoff considers such topics as fairness, decisions about which benefits should be subject to rationing, and whether to compensate those who are denied scarce resources. Finally, he offers a detailed discussion of what an effective and equitable healthcare rationing system would look like.
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Reading the Body: Live! http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/blog/?p=4043 http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/blog/?p=4043#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 14:29:09 +0000 http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/blog/?p=4043 http://medhum.med.nyu.edu/blog/?feed=rss2&p=4043 0 Freedom and our connection to the root http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/sSS8IGkpdxQ/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/sSS8IGkpdxQ/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 13:40:48 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5081 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/16/freedom-and-our-connection-to-the-root/feed/ 0 Defending Advance VSED – Hasten Death by Dehydration http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/VTRiulawiKY/defending-advance-vsed-hasten-death-by.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/VTRiulawiKY/defending-advance-vsed-hasten-death-by.html#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 07:30:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=963f3837e0c6a308703058f8c326cfc6 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/8441768351840706734/comments/default 0 de Beauvoir’s A Very Easy Death http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/de-beauvoirs-a-very-easy-death/ http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/de-beauvoirs-a-very-easy-death/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 04:50:33 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?p=52031 My dissertation advisor recommended that I read Simone de Beauvoir’s A Very Easy Death when I was writing my dissertation on ambivalence.  Apparently de Beauvoir was ambivalent towards her mother. But when I read that book, I wasn’t struck by quotations on ambivalence, but by these. They speak for themselves and are absolutely moving, haunting, and manage to so accurately capture so much about human experience—especially the experience of witnessing others’ deaths, hospitalizations, and suffering.

When picking out her mother’s funeral clothes:  “Before, I went through all this without seeing it. …

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Suicide Prevention: There’s an App for That http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/suicide-prevention-there-s-an-app-for-that http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/suicide-prevention-there-s-an-app-for-that#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 04:07:39 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=e4102ef25f0b5584bd923f164809452d http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/suicide-prevention-theres-an-app-for-that/feed/ 0 A “diagnosis” a physician can no longer make? http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/nmVN5EgIXc8/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/nmVN5EgIXc8/#comments Wed, 16 Jul 2014 03:06:13 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5038 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/15/a-diagnosis-a-physician-can-no-longer-make/feed/ 0 The VA Crisis is Fundamentally an Ethics Crisis http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=6993&blogid=140 http://www.thehastingscenter.org/Bioethicsforum/Post.aspx?id=6993&blogid=140#comments Tue, 15 Jul 2014 14:54:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=bcc9f5876d887e31b4bf1d25d34bb0c4 Evelyne Shuster]]> http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/the-va-crisis-is-fundamentally-an-ethics-crisis/feed/ 0 Hello, From Michigan! http://www.peterubel.com/2014/07/15/hello-from-michigan/ http://www.peterubel.com/2014/07/15/hello-from-michigan/#comments Tue, 15 Jul 2014 13:51:50 +0000 http://peterubel.com/?p=5936 http://www.peterubel.com/2014/07/15/hello-from-michigan/feed/ 0 Call for Papers – AALS Section on Law, Medicine & Health Care Works-in-Progress for New Teachers http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/bDXeFia2qLk/call-for-papers-aals-section-on-law.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/bDXeFia2qLk/call-for-papers-aals-section-on-law.html#comments Tue, 15 Jul 2014 08:30:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=8adc812f0270f0a50c647b2d36896537 Call for Papers


AALS Section on Law, Medicine & Health Care

Works-in-Progress for New Law School Teachers

AALS Annual Meeting, Washington, DC

Saturday, January 3, 2015


  
The AALS Section on Law, Medicine and Health Care is pleased to announce a Call for Papers for a special Works-in-Progress for New Law School Teachers Program.  The Section will run the Program from 5:15 to 6:30 p.m. on Saturday, January 3, at the AALS 2015 Annual Meeting in Washington, DC.


This program will bring together junior and senior health law scholars for a lively discussion of the junior scholar's’ works-in-progress.  Junior health law scholars will submit papers that they expect to submit in the spring 2015 law review submission cycle.  After they briefly present their papers in a concurrent roundtable setting, senior scholars will provide oral comments and critiques.  This new program presents an opportunity for the audience to hear cutting edge health law scholarship by recent members of the academy.


We will limit our selection to two or three papers.

Form & Length of Submission


Eligible faculty members are invited to submit either manuscripts or abstracts dealing with any aspect of health law or policy.  Abstracts must be comprehensive enough to allow the committee to meaningfully evaluate the aims and likely content of the papers proposed.  Papers may be accepted for publication but must be at a stage where input still would be useful.  Papers must not be published prior to the Annual Meeting.


Deadline & Submission Method


To be considered, manuscripts or abstracts and a CV must be submitted electronically to both: 
Chair, Section on Law, Medicine, and Health Care
Ani B. Satz, Emory University School of Law, asatz@law.emory.edu
Chair-elect, Section on Law, Medicine, and Health Care
Thaddeus Pope, Hamline University School of Law, tpope01@hamline.edu

The deadline for submission is September 1, 2014.


Selection & Notification


Papers will be selected after careful review and discussion by the Executive Board of the AALS Section on Law, Medicine, and Health Care.


The authors of the selected papers will be notified by September 22, 2014.


If a selected author has submitted only an abstract for review, the author must submit the corresponding manuscript by December 15, 2014.


The Call for Paper participants will be responsible for paying their annual meeting registration fee and travel expenses.


Eligibility


Full-time untenured faculty members of AALS member law schools are eligible to submit papers.  The following are ineligible to submit: foreign, visiting (without a full-time position at an AALS member law school) and adjunct faculty members, graduate students who are not also enrolled in a qualifying J.D. program, fellows, non-law school faculty, and faculty at fee-paid non-member schools.  Papers co-authored with a person ineligible to submit on their own may be submitted by the eligible co-author.



Please forward this Call for Papers to any eligible faculty who might be interested.


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Med Student vs. Dr. Oz http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/UxNseYkVsBA/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/UxNseYkVsBA/#comments Tue, 15 Jul 2014 02:49:29 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5066 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/14/med-student-vs-dr-oz/feed/ 0 Patient Modesty: Volume 67 http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2014/07/patient-modesty-volume-67.html http://bioethicsdiscussion.blogspot.com/2014/07/patient-modesty-volume-67.html#comments Mon, 14 Jul 2014 18:31:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=a2d363269c2ee65f31d67f303a342064








 So with Volume 66 reaching some 170 postings, we should move on to this Volume 67.  What is special on starting this new Volume is the fact that Artiger  joined us in Volume 66.  Artiger is a male physician (surgeon) verified by the Medscape medical website, where we both participate, who has provided us  with the long-needed professional input and education from the outside of this blog.  It appears that those writing to this thread have found his comments of interest and has accepted his presence here.  I have no idea how long Artiger will stick around but as long as he decides to do so, I will find him most welcome as a significant contributor to the ongoing discussion.  Here is Artiger's last posting from Volume 66. ..Maurice.


Misty, participating in this blog simply reinforced my current practice. I work on the assumption that everyone cares about modesty. If you'll go back to my original comments (posted by Maurice on June 26 at 7:30am), you'll see what I am thinking about during an examination or procedure. When discussing breast incisions with women, I tell them about where the scar will be, and my method of closure to achieve the best possible cosmetic outcome. Many of them tell me that they don't care what it looks like, and I respond by telling them that I care what it looks like.

I certainly understand if a female patient wants to drive another 100 miles or more to see a female surgeon. Like I said, I've got plenty more here that come to see me because of the service and courtesy I provide, not to mention how quickly I get them in to see me or get their procedure scheduled. Some people care more about that than gender. As an example I may have already mentioned, in an area we used to live, my wife drove 100 miles (past 2 female OB/gyn's) to see my best friend from medical school. Why? Because he gave her the best in care and service. I didn't have to convince her, seeing him was her idea. Never bothered either of us in the slightest, even when we would go visit them socially or take trips with them.

Don, yes, discussing these issues and concerns are about half of the office visit. Although we don't shave (we use clippers) we don't remove any more hair than necessary, just enough to allow for a clear field for the proposed incision. As for catheters, that is always discussed ahead of time as well. Catheters are useful but they are not without their risks, and they are not to be taken lightly.

No, the referring providers usually don't cover these things (they really wouldn't have a clue where to begin, I'll tell you candidly), as it's not their place to do so. That is what the office visit with me is for. If they could discuss all these things adequately then they could just call and schedule the procedure. I have never felt comfortable doing it that way, but there are a lot of places where you can get a colonoscopy without ever meeting the person who will do it. That's another part of my office visit that I feel is important...I want the patient to know me, who I am, what I look like, have all of their questions answered, and be comfortable with me as their surgeon.

Graphic:

Thom, Robert A.: Paré. Photograph. Britannica Online for Kids. Web. 14 July 2014.  
Ambroise Paré was a French army surgeon in the 1500s who invented compassionate ways to handle wounds and hemorrhages. The painting was done by Robert A. Thom in about 1954.

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Funerals – Posing the Dead as Living http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/j7RM2DnL6_s/funerals-posing-dead-as-living.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/j7RM2DnL6_s/funerals-posing-dead-as-living.html#comments Mon, 14 Jul 2014 09:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=b2763e701bf3a4c0eb963360e1d0751a http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/2053754438315235300/comments/default 0 New York’s Medical Marijuana Law May Just Be a Political Hoax? http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/new-york-s-medical-marijuana-law-may-just-be-a-political-hoax http://www.amc.edu/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/new-york-s-medical-marijuana-law-may-just-be-a-political-hoax#comments Mon, 14 Jul 2014 05:07:23 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=12124f8f08ff5ef3a95b2b49a0502e2d http://www.bioethics.net/2014/07/new-yorks-medical-marijuana-law-may-just-be-a-political-hoax/feed/ 0 Kentucky Judge to Decide on Hospital Treatment for Dead 2-Month Old Isaac Lopez http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/WIigk8SYHzc/kentucky-judge-to-decide-on-hospital.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/WIigk8SYHzc/kentucky-judge-to-decide-on-hospital.html#comments Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=9a98a47f1743898bbb6e103d121525a7 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/4198145270352222457/comments/default 0 20th World Federation Conference of Right to Die Societies http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/9-jYa_Dgxfc/20th-world-federation-conference-of.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/9-jYa_Dgxfc/20th-world-federation-conference-of.html#comments Sun, 13 Jul 2014 08:00:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=5fedc75645055790f00ea28f2cc51e67 http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/435929684131718320/comments/default 0 Safeguarding Our Stories, Our Selves http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/s-duPkJy1ds/ http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/bioethics-at-tiu/~3/s-duPkJy1ds/#comments Sat, 12 Jul 2014 12:00:47 +0000 http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/?p=5050 Read More »]]> http://blogs.tiu.edu/bioethics/2014/07/12/safeguarding-our-stories-our-selves/feed/ 0 International Conference on End of Life: Law, Ethics, Policy, and Practice http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/vnBhlUOHmyM/international-conference-on-end-of-life.html http://feedproxy.google.com/~r/MedicalFutilityBlog/~3/vnBhlUOHmyM/international-conference-on-end-of-life.html#comments Sat, 12 Jul 2014 07:30:00 +0000 http://www.bioethics.net/?guid=211babc8f4ba681b9fec06b090cc650b http://medicalfutility.blogspot.com/feeds/105574543263462393/comments/default 0 How To Tell Someone That She Is Dying http://www.peterubel.com/2014/07/11/how-to-tell-someone-that-she-is-dying/ http://www.peterubel.com/2014/07/11/how-to-tell-someone-that-she-is-dying/#comments Fri, 11 Jul 2014 15:25:48 +0000 http://peterubel.com/?p=5931 Continue reading ]]> http://www.peterubel.com/2014/07/11/how-to-tell-someone-that-she-is-dying/feed/ 0