Vol. 10 No. 10 | October 2010

Vol. 10 No. 10 | October 2010

ISBN: 1536-0075

editorial.

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target articles.

At the time of this writing, a widely publicized, waived-consent trial is underway. Sponsored by Northfield Laboratories, Inc. (Evanston, IL) the trial is intended to evaluate the emergency use of PolyHeme�, an oxygen-carrying resuscitative fluid that might prevent deaths from uncontrolled bleeding. The protocol allows patients in hemorrhagic shock to be randomized between PolyHeme� and...

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Senator Grassley discusses the policy impact of Kipnis, King and Nelson’s article, as well as his role in changing the conversation with the FDA. ...

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Much attention has been focused in recent years on the ethical acceptability of physicians receiving gifts from drug companies. Professional guidelines recognize industry gifts as a conflict of interest and establish thresholds prohibiting the exchange of large gifts while expressly allowing for the exchange of small gifts such as pens, note pads, and coffee. Considerable evidence from the social ...

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Diane Bieri, Executive Vice President and General Counsel of PhRMA, discusses the impact of the Katz, Kaplan and Merz article on conflicts of interest and physician interaction in the pharmaceutical industry. ...

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Contemporary research ethics policies started with reflection on the atrocities perpetrated upon concentration camp inmates by Nazi doctors. Apparently, as a consequence of that experience, the policies that now guide human subject research focus on the protection of human subjects by making informed consent the centerpiece of regulatory attention. I take the choice of context for policy design, t...

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Dr. Greg Koski with Harvard Medical School discusses the role of Rhodes’ article in furthering the discussion of modern research ethics. ...

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Detection of deception and confirmation of truth telling with conventional polygraphy raised a host of technical and ethical issues. Recently, newer methods of recording electromagnetic signals from the brain show promise in permitting the detection of deception or truth telling. Some are even being promoted as more accurate than conventional polygraphy. While the new technologies raise issues of...

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Steve Hyman of Harvard University discusses the relevance of Wolpe, Foster and Langleben’s article amidst the technological and bioethical advancements of the last five years. ...

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