Vol. 8 No. 2 | June 2017

Vol. 8 No. 2 | June 2017

ISBN: 2150-7740

editorial.

The articles by Goering, Klein, Dougherty, and Widge and Gilbert and colleagues are impressive examples of how a psychiatric intervention like deep brain stimulation (DBS) touches upon deep neuroscientific and neurophilosophical issues. Briefly, Gilbert and colleagues investigate subjective experience of the self and report self-estrangement in some DBS patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD)...

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target articles.

Staying in the Loop: Relational Agency and Identity in Next-Generation DBS for Psychiatry

Sara Goering, Eran Klein, Darin D. Dougherty & Alik S. Widge

In this article, we explore how deep brain stimulation (DBS) devices designed to “close the loop”—to automatically adjust stimulation levels based on computational algorithms—may risk taking the individual agent “out of the loop” of control in areas where (at least apparent) conscious control is a hallmark of our agency. This is of particular concern in the area of psychiatric disorder...

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I Miss Being Me: Phenomenological Effects of Deep Brain Stimulation

Frederic Gilbert , Eliza Goddard , John Noel M. Viaña , Adrian Carter & Malcolm Horne

The phenomenological effects of deep brain stimulation (DBS) on the self of the patient remains poorly understood and under described in the literature, despite growing evidence that a significant number of patients experience postoperative neuropsychiatric changes. To address this lack of phenomenological evidence, we conducted in-depth, semistructured interviews with 17 patients with Parkinson&#...

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