Vol. 18 No. 3 | September 2018

Vol. 18 No. 3 | September 2018

ISBN: 2150-7740

editorial.

In their interesting article, Birks and Buyx discuss the moral permissibility of using mandatory (nonconsensual) neurointerventions as an alternative to incarceration, for at least some people convicted of crimes. Neurointerventions are “interventions that exert a physical, chemical or biological effect on the brain in order to diminish the likelihood of some forms of criminal offending” (Doug...

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target articles.

How should we punish criminal offenders? One prima facie attractive punishment is administering a mandatory neurointervention—“interventions that exert a physical, chemical or biological effect on the brain in order to diminish the likelihood of some forms of criminal offending”. While testosterone-lowering drugs have long been used in European and US jurisdictions on sex offenders, it has b...

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Health care providers are expected both to relieve pain and to provide anticipatory guidance regarding how much a procedure is going to hurt. Fulfilling those expectations is complicated by the cognitive modulation of pain perception. Warning people to expect pain or setting expectations for pain relief not only influences their subjective experience, but it also alters how nociceptive ...

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