Vol. 14 No. 10 | October 2014

Vol. 14 No. 10 | October 2014

ISBN: 1526-5161

editorial.

In “Assessing the Likely Harms to Kidney Vendors in Regulated Organ Markets,” Julian Koplin (2014) argues that paid living kidney donation would result in physical, psychological, social, and financial harms for would-be sellers that more than offset the short-term financial benefits of selling. Koplin opposes paid living kidney donation on these grounds. Contrary to Koplin, I argue that the b...

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This is a recurring feature, appearing in AJOB twice a year, that highlights challenging cases in research ethics along with several commentaries that offer insights and perspectives about how to approach the issues raised by the cases. The cases are based on consults received by members of the Clinical Research Ethics Consultation Working Group of the CTSA consortium; these cases have been presen...

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target articles.

Advocates of paid living kidney donation frequently argue that kidney sellers would benefit from paid donation under a properly regulated kidney market. The poor outcomes experienced by participants in existing markets are often entirely attributed to harmful black-market practices. This article reviews the medical and anthropological literature on the physical, psychological, social, and financia...

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Conducting research studies with children requires that stringent federal and state regulations are met. In the case presented here, the biological father of a baby disclosed to a researcher that he was 9 years older than the adolescent mother. The research was conducted in a state where statutory rape is defined as sexual contact between a minor and someone 4 or more years older. What obligations...

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Case Study: Ethical Implications of Social Media in Health Care Research

Holly A. Taylor, Ellen Kuwana & Benjamin S. Wilfond

The initial contact with a potential subject, maintaining contact with enrolled subjects, and recontacting previous subjects are all key components to health care research success. Investigators have begun to explore using various forms of social media to support these activities. Social media are a possible bridge between researcher and subject, but this connection is not without ethical consider...

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Articles.

Case Study: Ethical Implications of Social Media in Health Care Research Holly A. Taylor, Ellen Kuwana & Benjamin S. Wilfond