Btn Rss Bioethics News.


U.S. appeals court rules against Wisconsin abortion doctor law

A Wisconsin law requiring doctors who perform abortions to have admitting privileges at a nearby hospital is unconstitutional, a U.S. appeals court ruled on Monday, addressing a topic the U.S. Supreme Court is considering during its current term.


Bioethics team creates online repository of advice on ethical research practices

Standardized ethics consultation templates will enable bioethicists to share best practices in a centralized, privacy-protected repository.


Woman Sues Hospital Over Traumatic Birth That ‘Turned Our Family Life Upside Down’

Caroline Malatesta was 32 years old and halfway through the pregnancy of her fourth child when she made a seemingly radical move: She switched hospitals, lured from one that had taken a typically medicalized approach to her three previous births — requiring that she labor on her back, feet in stirrups, with epidurals and episiotomies — to one that used a splashy new marketing campaign to offer women “autonomy,” birthing tubs, cushy suites, and the honoring of any “personalized birth plan.”


S.F. woman who sought to have embryos preserved loses legal case

A judge ruled Wednesday that the frozen embryos of a divorced San Francisco couple must be thawed and destroyed despite the ex-wife’s desire — over her former husband’s objections — to use them to become pregnant.


Can This Procedure Reverse an Abortion?

A slew of local reports regarding the Abortion Pill Reversal (APR) program — which attempts to cancel the effects of RU486, or mifepristone, through its Emergency Abortion Pill Reversal Kit, apparently offered by more than 300 providers across the country — have surfaced on local Fox News stations this week. But how was this procedure established? And is it actually effective? Opinions are split, Yahoo Parenting has found.


The Gene Hackers

A powerful new technology enables us to manipulate our DNA more easily than ever before.


Using social media in clinical research: Case studies address ethical gray areas

If a public-health researcher is reviewing Facebook profiles of 14-year-old males for firearm references and discovers photos or words referencing a potentially threatening situation, should the researcher intervene? What levels of privacy should these children expect in the online world.


Stanford scientists criticize NIH moratorium

A group of seven Stanford scientists spoke out last week against the National Institute of Health’s decision to suspend funding for a specific type of stem cell research. They argued that the moratorium will discourage work with tremendous potential to advance medicine.


Coca-Cola Spends Millions Of Dollars Funding Research That—Surprise!—Says Soda Is Just Fine

Last week, the University of Colorado announced that it would return a $1 million gift from Coca-Cola—news that came after a New York Times article in August revealed that the soda company funded a group of scientists called the Global Energy Balance Network that downplayed the relationship between soda and obesity, emphasizing instead the importance of exercise.


Flag Football: The Alternative for Concerned Parents

Cliff Ward Jr. is a self-described football nut. The Hebron, Ohio, resident first played football in third grade. His father was a high-school football star. But his 9-year-old son, Ty, is playing something different—flag football, on a local YMCA team.


US FDA sends letter to DNA4Life over consumer gene tests

The U.S. Food and Drug Administration sent a letter to privately held gene testing company DNA4Life over the company’s sale of an unapproved direct-to-consumer gene test to predict drug response.


The Theranos mess: A timeline

How the blood-testing company went from hot to troubled in just a couple of weeks.


Can This Procedure Reverse an Abortion?

A slew of local reports regarding the Abortion Pill Reversal (APR) program — which attempts to cancel the effects of RU486, or mifepristone, through its Emergency Abortion Pill Reversal Kit, apparently offered by more than 300 providers across the country — have surfaced on local Fox News stations this week. But how was this procedure established? And is it actually effective? Opinions are split, Yahoo Parenting has found.


Human-animal chimeras: Stanford scientists condemn funding ban

The Obama administration has quietly clamped a moratorium on a new type of stem-cell research, triggering a letter from a group of Stanford scientists condemning the move and saying that it could delay discoveries in a promising field of medicine.


Researchers urge lifting of NIH funding restrictions on chimeric research

In September, the National Institutes of Health halted research funding for chimeric human/nonhuman embryos until new funding guidelines are established. Stanford researchers describe the detrimental impact of a ban.


Marijuana is literally the least of the nation’s drug worries, the police have announced

America’s cops overwhelmingly do not see marijuana as a major threat to their communities, according to results of a survey released this week as part of the Drug Enforcement Administration’s “2015 National Drug Threat Assessment Summary.”


Junk Food Not to Blame for America’s Obesity Epidemic: Study

“These are foods that are clearly bad for you and if you eat too much of them they will make you fat, but it doesn’t appear to be the main driver that is making people overweight and obese,” said lead researcher David Just, co-director of the Cornell Center for Behavioral Economics, in Ithaca, N.Y.


France ends law banning blood donation from gay men

France has decided to end a more than 30-year-old law that banned gay men from donating blood, a measure originally put in place to stop the spread of diseases such as HIV.


A group of middle-aged whites in the U.S. is dying at a startling rate

A large segment of white middle-aged Americans has suffered a startling rise in its death rate since 1999, according to a review of statistics published Monday that shows a sharp reversal in decades of progress toward longer lives.


Kids get more cavities when they live with smokers

Young children are much more likely to get cavities if they live in a household with smokers, a Japanese study suggests.


Popular cholesterol drugs may make flu vaccine less effective

Millions of people who take statins to lower cholesterol may not get maximum protection from flu vaccines, two new studies suggest.


Personal Care Products With Parabens May Be Dangerous, Even At Low Levels; What To Look For On Labels

Every morning after waking up, when a person showers and shampoos their hair, lotions their body, dons sunscreen, or moisturizes their face, they expose themselves to dozens of controversial, possibly harmful chemicals. Called parabens, a team of researchers from the University of California Berkeley recently discovered these chemicals may be more dangerous at low doses than previously thought.


Heaven over hospital: Dying girl, age 5, makes a choice

Julianna Snow is dying of an incurable disease. She’s stable at the moment, but any germ that comes her way, even just the common cold virus, could kill her. She’s told her parents that the next time this happens, she wants to die at home instead of going to the hospital for treatment.


Clash in the name of Care

It was a battle pitting a star surgeon against a great hospital, MGH. The question: Is it right or safe for surgeons to run two operations at once? Is it right that their patients may have no idea? The conflict went on for years. And it isn’t over yet.


Concussion treatment, diagnosis focus of world sports conference

Medical experts and National Football League (NFL) officials will gather with peers from other top global sports on Saturday in a bid to accelerate how to properly diagnose and treat player concussions.


Even doctors and nurses don’t always have healthy lifestyles

Even doctors and nurses don’t always follow the healthy lifestyle choices they recommend for patients to reduce the risk of medical problems like obesity, heart disease and diabetes, a U.S. study suggests.


23andMe relaunches consumer genetic testing service

Consumer genetics testing company 23andMe said on Wednesday it was relaunching its personal DNA testing service with a limited menu of tests that have won the approval of the U.S. Food and Drug Administration.


Almost half of elderly patients miscalculate life expectancy

Almost half of elderly people don’t have an accurate sense of how much longer they’re likely to live, a problem that may lead some of them to make poorly informed medical decisions, a U.S. study suggests.


Subway shifting all U.S. meat supplies to no-antibiotics-ever

Sandwich chain Subway will start serving antibiotic-free chicken and turkey at its U.S. restaurants next year, and within the next nine years will stop selling any meat from animals given antibiotics, the company said Tuesday.


Patient dies during Zafgen’s obesity drug trial

Zafgen Inc said a patient died during a late-stage trial testing the company’s drug to treat Prader-Willi syndrome, a rare genetic disorder that leads to obesity.