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Perceived discrimination linked to smoking and poor diet

Feeling like the target of discrimination may increase a person’s odds of harmful behaviors like smoking, eating fatty foods and getting less sleep, a study of African-Americans suggests.


Medical students and physicians share their writings on “becoming a real doctor”

The dilemma of being a medical student on clinical rounds who wants to help patients but can’t was captured by third-year student Raymond Deng in his essay “Performing Grief,” at a recent reading held by Stanford’s Medicine and the Muse Program and Pegasus Physician Writers group.


Physician-Assisted Suicide to Become Legal in California

Governor Jerry Brown signed the “End of Life Option Act” on Monday, granting terminally ill patients in California the right to end their lives with the help of a physician.


California Governor Signs Assisted Suicide Bill Into Law

California on Monday joined the short list of states allowing doctors to prescribe drugs for terminally ill patients to end their lives as Gov. Jerry Brown signed the measure into law, ending months of silence on one of the most emotional issues for the state this year.


Venom experts say global snake bite death tolls ‘grossly underestimated’

Venom specialists said on Wednesday disease and disability caused by snake bites is far higher than official global health estimates suggest and antivenom stocks are running dangerously low.


Scientists find genes that protect African children from malaria

Scientists have identified specific genetic variations that protect some African children from developing severe malaria and say their discovery will boost the fight against a disease that kills around half a million children a year.


U.S. rule to cut toxic emissions at refineries

U.S. oil refineries will face tighter standards in coming years on toxic emissions that cause lung problems and increase cancer risks, environmental regulators said on Tuesday.


Pregnant cancer patients shouldn’t terminate or delay treatment: study

Pregnant women diagnosed with cancer do not need a termination and can start treatment immediately without worrying unduly about the effects of drugs or radiation on their unborn babies, cancer specialists said on Monday.


U.S. ‘right to try’ laws may not help dying get unapproved drugs

So-called “right to try” laws, intended to expand dying patients’ access to experimental treatments, may not work as expected – and might strip patients of federal safety protections, some experts say.


Black patients fare better than whites when both get same healthcare, study finds

A nine-year study of more than 3 million veterans found that when black patients and white patients received the same level of healthcare, blacks fared better than whites.


Black patients fare better than whites when both get same healthcare, study finds

A nine-year study of more than 3 million veterans found that when black patients and white patients received the same level of healthcare, blacks fared better than whites.


Clinton plan to cut health costs includes tax credits, more sick visits

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton unveiled a plan on Wednesday to lower out-of-pocket health costs, including expanded coverage of sick visits to the doctor and tax credits for those with substantial medical bills.


You’re surrounded by a cloud of bacteria as unique as a fingerprint

Do you ever feel like you’re all alone in the world? Well, don’t. At every moment of your life, you’re surrounded by a cloud of bacteria. These microbial companions are so unique to you that the cloud — which you leave traces of everywhere you go — might actually be as identifiable as a fingerprint.


Clinton to propose cap on out-of-pocket costs for some drugs

Democratic presidential candidate Hillary Clinton will unveil a plan this week to cap monthly out-of-pocket costs for specialty drugs, a proposal her campaign said would reduce profiteering by drug companies.


New: 87 Deceased NFL Players Test Positive for Brain Disease

A total of 87 out of 91 former NFL players have tested positive for the brain disease at the center of the debate over concussions in football, according to new figures from the nation’s largest brain bank focused on the study of traumatic head injury.


Researchers Apply For Permission To Alter DNA Of Human Embryos

The first British researchers have applied for permission to alter the DNA of human embryos to better understand the reason women have miscarriages, amid a broader debate over whether the testing is appropriate.


Poverty may increase odds of repeat hospitalizations

When patients are hospitalized more than once in the same month, it may have more to do with their income or education levels than the quality of care they received, a U.S. study suggests.


Rise in crowdfunding lets patients seek help for medical treatment

When Esperanza Hannon was denied entrance to a clinical trial in June, it was another dashed hope in many attempts to find treatment for her fast-spreading breast cancer.


Military’s Prosthetic Hand Can Feel

In the first series of tests, researchers gently touched each finger of the prosthetic hand while the man was wearing a blindfold.  He was able to state with nearly 100-percent accuracy which finger was being touched, the Defense Advanced Research Projects Agency, better known as DARPA, said in a statement Friday.


Stanford scientists produce cancer drug from rare plant in lab to benefit human health

Stanford scientists produced a common cancer drug – previously only available from an endangered plant – in a common laboratory plant. This work could lead to a more stable supply of the drug and allow scientists to manipulate that drug to make it even safer and more effective.


What’s next for Kim Davis? Judge says she can’t withhold marriage licenses

The Rowan County, Kentucky, clerk, who was held in contempt for defying a court order and refusing to issue same-sex marriage licenses, was released with a caveat she may not be willing to accept.


Earth’s Oceans Could Look Completely Different by the End of the Century

Beneath the swelling blue surf, ocean life is on the move. Marine species are swimming into new new communities and forcing others out. By the end of the century, the ecosystems that cover 70% of our planet’s surface will look completely different.


81 percent of hospitals and health insurance companies have had a data breach

In the past two years, 81 percent of hospitals and health insurance companies have had a data breach, according to a report released by KPMG.


U.S. government to extend healthcare nondiscrimination law to transgender people

The U.S. government said on Thursday it will extend its healthcare nondiscrimination law to transgender individuals and require health insurers and medical providers to treat all patients equally, regardless of sex.


Stethoscope meets smartphone and the heart knows it’s right

The Food and Drug Administration has cleared for the U.S. market a digital stethoscope, the Eko Core, that aims to bring auscultation — the ancient medical practice of listening to a patient’s heartbeat — squarely into the 21st century.


Coerced sterilization of Canadian indigenous women in 70s widespread: researcher

The coercive sterilization of indigenous women in Canadian health centers during the 1970s was more widespread than previously believed, with impoverished communities in the north disproportionately targeted, a researcher has found.


The Changing Definition of What Is ‘Brain Dead’

The declaration of “brain dead” for Oakland teenager Jahi McMath brings up the question: How is new medical technology changing the way we define death?


Cancer sniffing dogs to aid British doctors

They’re known as man’s best friend; but dogs could soon also be their greatest ally in the fight against prostate cancer. Britain’s National Health Service recently approved a trial for dogs capable of sniffing out prostate cancer in the hope that it could show up inaccuracies in the current PSA (prostate specific antigen) test.


Veterans discharged for misconduct have higher risk of homelessness

U.S. veterans returning from Afghanistan and Iraq who were discharged due to misconduct are more likely to be homeless than other returning vets, according to a new study.


Multiple sclerosis linked to lower levels of vitamin D

Researches have shown that individuals deficient in vitamin D may be susceptible to multiple sclerosis.