Btn Rss Bioethics News.

10/17/2016

Comparison of Physician and Computer Diagnostic Accuracy

JAMA

The Institute of Medicine recently highlighted that physician diagnostic error is common and information technology may be part of the solution.1 Given advancements in computer science, computers may be able to independently make accurate clinical diagnoses.2 While studies have compared computer vs physician performance for reading electrocardiograms,3 the diagnostic accuracy of computers vs physicians remains unknown. To fill this gap in knowledge, we compared the diagnostic accuracy of physicians with computer algorithms called symptom checkers.

10/14/2016

Doctors Significantly Better Than Google, According To New Research

Huffington Post

Doctors are much better than symptom-checker programs at reaching a correct diagnosis, though the humans are not perfect and might benefit from using algorithms to supplement their skills, a small study suggests.

10/13/2016

Major Investor Sues Theranos

WSJ

One of Theranos Inc.’s biggest financial backers has sued the embattled startup and its founder for allegedly lying to attract its nearly $100 million investment, according to a fund document and people familiar with the matter.

10/12/2016

Excuse Me, Why Are You Wearing Those Surgical Scrubs Outside The Hospital?

WBUR

I work in Boston’s Longwood Medical Area, one of the densest concentrations of hospitals in the country, and I often have this reaction when I’m out on the street among my work neighbors: “Dude. Ew.”

10/11/2016

80% of China’s clinical trial data are fraudulent, investigation finds

BMJ

Just over 80% of clinical trial data submitted to support new drug registrations in China have been revealed as fraudulent or substandard by the country’s drug regulator.  An investigation of data for 1622 new drugs submitted to China’s State Food and Drug Administration (CFDA) for registration said that 1308 of the applications should be withdrawn because they contained fabricated, flawed, or inadequate data from clinical trials.

10/10/2016

This Scientist Is Trying To Unravel What Sugar Does To The Brain

NPR

Most of us have been tempted at one time or another by the lure of sugar. Think of all the cakes and cookies you consume between Thanksgiving and Christmastime!

10/07/2016

This 8-year-old is free of cancer — for now — after a ‘breakthrough’ treatment

Washington Post

By the time 8-year-old Ava Christianson got to the National Institutes of Health this summer, she had lost several grueling rounds to leukemia and was bracing for the next one.

10/06/2016

Doctors’ Political Views Affect How They Treat Patients

The Atlantic

How bad is that thrice-weekly pot habit? How dangerous is it to keep a gun in your home? A new study by Eitan D. Hersh and Matthew N. Goldenberg of Yale University suggests doctors’ responses to those and other hot-button issues could be colored by their political views.

10/05/2016

How We Got Here: Treating Addiction In 28 Days

NPR

Louis Casanova is playing cards with a friend on the back deck of a recovery house in Philadelphia’s northern suburbs.

10/04/2016

Are Swedish Designer Babies Coming Soon?

Seeker

A Swedish medical researcher has taken another step toward eventually being able to engineer a custom-made human being. The experiment, first reported on NPR Thursday involves editing the genes of a developing human embryo.

10/03/2016

Furor Over Drug Prices Puts Patient Advocacy Groups in Bind

NY Times

Public anger over the cost of drugs has burned hot for a year, coursing through social media, popping up on the presidential campaign, and erupting in a series of congressional hearings, including one last week over the rising price of the allergy treatment EpiPen.

09/30/2016

Deal emerges to curb greenhouse-gas emissions from aviation

Nature

Governments will begin final negotiations this week on a plan to curb carbon emissions from international aircraft flights beginning in 2020.

09/29/2016

Depression, daily stressors and inflammatory responses to high-fat meals: when stress overrides healthier food choices

Nature

Depression, stress and diet can all alter inflammation. This double-blind, randomized crossover study addressed the impact of daily stressors and a history of major depressive disorder (MDD) on inflammatory responses to high-fat meals. During two separate 9.5 h admissions, 58 healthy women (38 breast cancer survivors and 20 demographically similar controls), mean age 53.1 years, received either a high saturated fat meal or a high oleic sunflower oil meal. The Daily Inventory of Stressful Events assessed prior day stressors and the Structured Clinical Interview for DSM-IV evaluated MDD. As expected, for a woman with no prior day stressors, C-reactive protein (CRP), serum amyloid A (SAA), intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (sICAM-1) and vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (sVCAM-1) were higher following the saturated fat meal than the high oleic sunflower oil meal after controlling for pre-meal measures, age, trunk fat and physical activity. But if a woman had prior day stressors, these meal-related differences disappeared—because the stressors heightened CRP, SAA, sICAM-1 and sVCAM-1 responses to the sunflower oil meal, making it look more like the responses to the saturated fat meal. In addition, women with an MDD history had higher post-meal blood pressure responses than those without a similar history. These data show how recent stressors and an MDD history can reverberate through metabolic alterations, promoting inflammatory and atherogenic responses.

09/28/2016

World’s first baby born from new procedure using DNA of three people

The Guardian

The world’s first baby to be born from a new procedure that combines the DNA of three people appears to be healthy, according to doctors in the US who oversaw the treatment.

09/27/2016

Why Do Obese Patients Get Worse Care? Many Doctors Don’t See Past the Fat

NY Times

You must lose weight, a doctor told Sarah Bramblette, advising a 1,200-calorie-a-day diet. But Ms. Bramblette had a basic question: How much do I weigh?

09/26/2016

Too Poor for Proper Plumbing: A Reality in 500,000 U.S. Homes

NY Times

TYLER, Ala. — The hard clay soil in this rural Southern county has twice cursed Dorothy Rudolph. It is good for growing cotton and cucumbers, the crops she worked as a child and hated. And it is bad for burying things — in particular, septic tanks.

09/23/2016

Researchers Confront an Epidemic of Loneliness

NY Times

The woman on the other end of the phone spoke lightheartedly of spring and of her 81st birthday the previous week. “Who did you celebrate with, Beryl?” asked Alison, whose job was to offer a kind ear. “No one, I…” And with that, Beryl’s cheer turned to despair.

09/22/2016

Belgium minor first to be granted euthanasia

BBC News

A terminally ill 17-year-old has become the first minor to be helped to die in Belgium since age restrictions on euthanasia requests were removed two years ago, officials say.

09/21/2016

Study: Opioid use down in states with medical marijuana

The Olympian

States that allow medical marijuana to be used to treat pain show a decline in the use of opioids, according to a new study.  The study, published in the American Journal of Public Health, examined 69,000 traffic fatalities in 18 states from 1999 to 2013, focusing on differences between states that legalized medical marijuana and those that had not.

09/20/2016

Voters barely worry about their own health. Do they really care about the president’s?

Washington Post

The first of three planned presidential debates will take place at Hofstra University in Hempstead, N.Y., on Sept. 26. Maybe it’s good the debate is slated for a gym. If Hillary Clinton and Donald Trump are really serious about proving their physical vigor and stamina, they can do laps in the arena while they answer questions.

09/16/2016

Employees Are Paying A Bigger Chunk Of Health Insurance Costs

NPR

High deductible health plans are the new normal.  Just over half of employees this year have a health insurance policy with a deductible of at least $1,000, according to a survey of employers from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

09/15/2016

Stop ignoring misconduct

Nature

The history of science shows that irreproducibility is not a product of our times. Some 350 years ago, the chemist Robert Boyle penned essays on “the unsuccessfulness of experiments”. He warned readers to be sceptical of reported work. “You will meet with several Observations and Experiments, which … may upon further tryal disappoint your expectation.” He attributed the problem to a ‘lack of skill in the scientist and the lack of purity of the ingredients’, and what would today be referred to as inadequate statistical power.

09/14/2016

How the Sugar Industry Shifted Blame to Fat

NY Times

The sugar industry paid scientists in the 1960s to play down the link between sugar and heart disease and promote saturated fat as the culprit instead, newly released historical documents show.

09/13/2016

Hillary Clinton’s Reluctance To Address Health Issues Follows A Long Tradition

NPR

Hillary Clinton’s begrudging release of information related to her health on Sunday follows a pattern set by candidates and many who have won the Oval Office. It is a pattern of secrecy and, in some cases, cover-ups that would be scandalous if they occurred on other issues of policy.

09/12/2016

What It Feels Like to Die

The Atlantic

“Do you want to know what will happen as your body starts shutting down?”

My mother and I sat across from the hospice nurse in my parents’ Colorado home. It was 2005, and my mother had reached the end of treatments for metastatic breast cancer. A month or two earlier, she’d been able to take the dog for daily walks in the mountains and travel to Australia with my father. Now, she was weak, exhausted from the disease and chemotherapy and pain medication.

09/09/2016

Another scathing report causes more eminent heads to roll in the Macchiarini scandal

Science

The scandal surrounding Paolo Macchiarini, the former star surgeon who became famous for his pioneering trachea transplants, has prompted yet another round of resignations and firings at the highest levels of Swedish higher education. On Monday evening, Swedish Minister for Higher Education and Research Helene Hellmark Knutsson said she had dismissed the country’s chancellor in charge of all public universities, Harriet Wallberg-Henriksson, following the release of a sharply critical report by an independent commission that examined the Karolinska Institute’s (KI’s) hiring and management of Macchiarini. Wallberg-Henriksson was vice-chancellor of KI in Stockholm, a position comparable to that of a university president, when Macchiarini was hired, and played a key role in his recruitment.

09/09/2016

Blue ribbon report urges U.S. cancer moonshot to invest in 10 promising areas

Science

Vice President Joe Biden’s proposed moonshot to conquer cancer should invest in large collaborations, data sharing projects, and the promising cancer treatment known as immunotherapy, among 10 areas described in an advisory group’s draft report released this morning. The report was accepted (with one abstention) today by the National Cancer Institute’s (NCI’s) advisory board, which is expected to pass it on to the NCI director and then to a federal task force. Now, Congress just needs to come up with the money to pay for the moonshot, research advocates say.

09/08/2016

Cesarean Birth Linked to Risk of Obesity in Childhood

U.S. News

Infants delivered by cesarean section may face a higher risk of becoming obese, a new study suggests.

09/07/2016

Frenchwoman who got world’s 1st face transplant dies at 49

Washington Post

Isabelle Dinoire, a Frenchwoman who received the world’s first partial face transplant, has died 11 years after the surgery that set the stage for dozens of other transplants worldwide. She was 49.

09/06/2016

FDA Orders Antibacterials Removed From Consumer Soaps

NBC

Say goodbye to those “antibacterial” soaps. The Food and Drug Administration says they do little or nothing to make soap work any better and said the industry has failed to prove they’re safe.