Tag: aging

Blog Posts (9)

November 12, 2014

Why the right to die movement needed Brittany Maynard

by Keisha Ray, Ph.D.

Brittany Maynard was diagnosed with brain cancer. At the age of 29 she decided to end her own life and “die with dignity” under Oregon’s “Death with Dignity Act.” There have been many articles written in support of Maynard’s choice and many articles written condemning her choice to die.…

June 12, 2014

How Old Are You? Philosophy of Age and Its Relevance for Bioethics

by J.S. Blumenthal-Barby, Ph.D.

How old are you?

Robert Pogue Harrison, Literature Professor at Stanford University, recently reflected on this question during a monologue on his radio show, “Entitled Opinions.” (Plug for this great show, by the way: http://www.stanford.edu/dept/fren-ital/opinions/)

Strikingly, he makes the case that although several scholars have offered a philosophy of time (most notably Martin Heidegger), a philosophical analysis of age has been lacking.…

June 6, 2014

Low T, marketing, youth, and sex

Hormone replacement therapy is back in the news: not estrogen/progesterone for women, but testosterone for men. There are some similarities between the two therapies. Each was/is heralded by claims for the amazing cures it would/will provide for a multitude of life’s ailments. Estrogen/progesterone was prescribed for legions of women with a lot of assumptions that it would do wonderful things like help dementia and cardiovascular... // Read More »
April 28, 2014

Death Panels are Back, and They Want to Pay Grandma to Die

by Patricia Mayer, MD, Bioethics Program Alumna (2009) Run for the hills: federally-funded Death Panels are back! Ok, that was a bit of a cheap shot.  But many of us in medicine – especially those in hospice and palliative care – are still incensed by the “Death Panel” scandal. As many know, the myth of […]
April 28, 2014

Death Panels are Back, and They Want to Pay Grandma to Die

by Patricia Mayer, MD, Bioethics Program Alumna (2009) Run for the hills: federally-funded Death Panels are back! Ok, that was a bit of a cheap shot.  But many of us in medicine – especially those in hospice and palliative care – are still incensed by the “Death Panel” scandal. As many know, the myth of […]
April 11, 2014

What Price Immortality? Privately Funded Projects and the Prolongation of Life

By Richard Koo, Bioethics Program Alum (MS Bioethics 2011) and Adjunct Faculty Seemingly ripped from the covers of comic books, no less than three privately funded projects seeking the prolongation of human life have been publicized in the past year. The 2045 Initiative, dubbed “the Avatar Project”, is arguably the most futuristic and non-traditional of the […]
April 11, 2014

What Price Immortality? Privately Funded Projects and the Prolongation of Life

By Richard Koo, Bioethics Program Alum (MS Bioethics 2011) and Adjunct Faculty Seemingly ripped from the covers of comic books, no less than three privately funded projects seeking the prolongation of human life have been publicized in the past year. The 2045 Initiative, dubbed “the Avatar Project”, is arguably the most futuristic and non-traditional of the […]
November 6, 2007

Knocking back a few beers with Aubrey de Grey

Joel Garreau spends some time with Aubrey de Grey, prophet of the 1000 year lifespan, for the Washington Post:

“Another thing that’s going to have to change completely is retirement.

October 17, 2007

Changing our perceptions of aging

Two pieces — from very different perspectives — about efforts to change the way we think about the elderly.

In the first, Portfolio’s “Odd Numbers” blogger Zubin Jeleveh looks at a recent working paper that attempts to define “elderly” not by number of years lived, but rather by mortality risk and remaining life expectancy.…

Published Articles (1)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 8 - Aug 2013

Justice Between Age Groups: An Objection to the Prudential Lifespan Approach Nancy S. Jecker

News (2)

January 26, 2015 2:49 pm

Golden years? Researcher explores longevity research and the companies banking on its success

Aging research, as we knew it in the 1990s and 2000’s, is being abandoned in favor of something much more ambitious. The central features of longevity research include an embrace of big data, a pivot away from studies hoping to find aging genes, a recognition that aging is best thought of a collection of diseases, not just one disease.
February 24, 2012 12:26 am

Could babies born today live to 150? (CBS News)

In 1850, the average human lifespan was 43 years. Now it’s closer to 80. How high could it go? And what effect will the ever-increasing lifespan of humans have upon society? #bioethics #aging