Tag: Allocation / Access / Public Health

Blog Posts (61)

January 6, 2017

Party politics, people’s lives

As health care financing rises yet again to the top of our national legislative agenda, some fundamental questions ought to be strongly considered. First, and most fundamental: Is some level of healthcare a right, that the government is therefore obligated to protect? Is it better viewed as a common good, like roads and fire protection services, that everybody pays for through taxes and everybody benefits... // Read More »
November 23, 2016

Christian ethics and the powerless

The recent political campaign and election week have had many of us thinking about politics and government. For those of us who look at bioethics from a biblical perspective we have had to think about how our perspective on moral issues affects public policy and how we as a people govern ourselves. What do we do when no one seems to support a public policy... // Read More »
November 19, 2016

Pre-Existing Conditions 2.0

Back in 2005, Dr. Ezekiel Emanuel co-wrote an article with Dr. Victor Fuchs entitled “Getting Covered”, where the authors described three factors necessary for major healthcare reform: the problem attracts political attention; major players agree upon a refined and feasible solution; and a transforming political event occurs. Their criteria were met with the election of Barack Obama and a Democrat-controlled Congress in 2008, resulting in... // Read More »
November 6, 2016

Another election, another round of health care reform

Now that we Chicagolanders don’t have the World Series to distract us anymore, we have to go back to thinking about the upcoming election. Health care financing is of course one important issue in the presidential race. One side wants to repeal and replace the Affordable Care Act (aka Obamacare), the other wants to keep it and work to fix it. Whoever wins, it’s evident... // Read More »
September 28, 2016

The cost-effectiveness of prenatal screening for Down syndrome

Because the British National Health Service is a governmental single-payer system decisions about what is covered in that system involve public discussion. That leads to public discussion of ethical issues that frequently manage to avoid the public eye in the US. A recent article in the Daily Mail talks about an issue that is being debated by the British NHS. They are currently deciding whether... // Read More »
September 25, 2016

Zika and Genetically Modified Mosquitoes

Just last week, I received a call from a pollster.  It’s election season and I live in a hotly contested ‘swing state,’ so I wasn’t surprised.   What surprised me were the questions I was asked, mostly about the Zika virus—its spread and possible prevention.  One question especially caught my attention:  Are you in favor of genetically modified (GM) mosquitos?   Bioethics in a poll question!  I... // Read More »
August 29, 2016

Bioethics & Pharmaceutical Prices

Just last week a man walked into my office holding a vile of insulin.  He told me its cost and how much it has increased over time.  He expressed genuine fear that people would not be able to afford it much longer and that they would eventually die because of it. Later that day, I noticed that the Washington Post and other media outlets were... // Read More »
August 29, 2016

The $280 Better Mousetrap

The rising cost of the Mylan EpiPen has been in the news. Since 2007, Mylan has raised the cost of their two pack EpiPen from just under $100 to over $600 today. That is a cool $300 per EpiPen, substantially above the ten to twenty dollar retail cost of the raw material epinephrine. Why should I be asked to spend a $280 mark-up? Is this... // Read More »
August 6, 2016

Vouchers for Kidneys

An innovative voucher program has begun at the UCLA Medical Center to increase the number of live kidney donations. The program allows for an individual to donate his or her kidney in exchange for a voucher that allows the donor’s specified voucher recipient to receive a kidney in the future. See HERE for the details. Presently the number of people needing a kidney donation far... // Read More »
August 5, 2016

The surprisingly small benefit of some very (expensive) Big Ideas

Last week, JAMA published online a Viewpoint provocatively titled, “What Happens When Underperforming Big Ideas in Research Become Entrenched?” The overarching Big Idea to which the article refers is the “narrative positing that a combination of ever-deeper knowledge of subcellular biology, especially genetics, coupled with information technology will lead to transformative improvements in health care and human health.” The article highlights three technologies that are... // Read More »

View More Blog Entries