Tag: bioethics

Blog Posts (73)

July 18, 2014

Is complicity important in Hobby Lobby decision?

ontinued litigation will not unite the country but compromise can. Forcing individuals and their companies to act against deeply held religious belief should not be done and will only inflame partisan rancor.
July 16, 2014

Freedom and our connection to the root

It has been almost a month since the CBHD summer bioethics conference and I am still reflecting on some of the things I experienced there. One that left a lasting impact was the presentation by a sculptor, Karen Swenholt, which was sponsored by the Tennessee Center for Bioethics and Culture on Friday evening. As she presented slides of her art and talked about the meaning... // Read More »
July 15, 2014

A “diagnosis” a physician can no longer make?

If you were to follow the trends on gender identity discussion you would be unsurprised to see this article in The Slate: “Don’t Let the Doctor Do This to Your Newborn” The author begins by portraying a physician taking a newborn away from a worried mother for a “procedure,” which turns out to be gender “assignment.” This physician, described as stern, masked, dismissive, knuckle-cracking, paternalistic,... // Read More »
July 14, 2014

Med Student vs. Dr. Oz

Since my last post was about Dr. Oz I thought I may as well post an update: Benjamin Mazer, a medical student at the University of Rochester has introduced a policy to the Medical Society of the State of New York in an attempt to regulate the kinds of wild claims that Dr. Oz makes on his show. His proposal is to treat health claims... // Read More »
July 12, 2014

Safeguarding Our Stories, Our Selves

While having a “sit-down-family-meal” with a son and his family over the recent holiday weekend–something that happens far too infrequently in families today—our six-year-old grandson attempted to leave the table during the post-meal conversations but was restrained by his mother. “Conversations are boring,” was his frustrated response to his unpleasant imprisonment. His response brought to mind a similar attitude in another 10-year-old grandson who refuses... // Read More »
July 11, 2014

Multidisciplinary Members and Staff Reflect the Unique Field of Bioethics

At first glance legal scholars, doctors, philosophers, scientists, and engineers may not appear to have much in common; however, members of these professions make up the Presidential Commission for the Study of Bioethical Issues (Bioethics Commission). For the past four years, since its first public meeting on July 8, 2010, the Bioethics Commission has been […]
July 11, 2014

The Recent Stem Cell News

Last week’s edition of Nature includes developments in the world of stem cell research, also noted in the general press: First: A group from Portland, San Diego, and Stockholm published work (payment required to read article) seeking to define the “best” human pluripotent stem cells on cellular and molecular grounds.  They compared: Stem cells taken from an embryo, created in IVF and destroyed for the... // Read More »
July 8, 2014

Burwell v. Hobby Lobby: A thin margin indeed

The recent Supreme Court decision, Burwell v. Hobby Lobby, has been hailed as a victory for religious rights, but in the Supreme Court’s majority opinion there are ominous signs for bioethics. First, no commentator so far has mentioned that the Supreme Court decision implies that the only legally viable objection to underwriting abortifacient interventions must be religious in nature. The thin margin of decision by... // Read More »
July 8, 2014

Persons, Personhood, and Primates

Back in December of 2013, Steve Phillips wrote a splendid blog on the legal case in New York that sought to establish rights for non-human primates (specifically, chimpanzees) based upon the concept of personhood. It captured the essence of the issue effectively enough that, with uncharacteristic wisdom and restraint, I felt no need to add to the discussion. This issue is not, of course, closed... // Read More »
July 3, 2014

Musing About the Hobby Lobby Decision

I am in the camp that applauds this week’s Supreme Court decision in the Hobby Lobby case.  But of course others disagree, and I was not surprised to see that there is alarm on the pages of the New England Journal of Medicine.   A “Perspectives” article written by two attorneys (one with a bioethics degree) and one M.D. includes two graphs, in particular, that I... // Read More »