Tag: bioethics

Blog Posts (178)

March 25, 2015

Fetal homicide

A recent AP news article posted on ABC News online about the bizarre case of a woman in Colorado who said she was pregnant then lured a pregnant woman into her house and attacked her with a knife and cut her baby from her womb, and then told her husband that she had miscarried and the dying baby was her own discusses the related issue... // Read More »
March 23, 2015

A Right to Know?

As humans, we have a desire to know who we are and from where we come. Perhaps our reason for this desire is to learn our history, or to help determine our future. Perhaps we desire this knowledge to understand our current condition – be it a medical condition or simply curiosity. Whether this stems from a desire to better understand one’s own identity or... // Read More »
March 22, 2015

Rebuilding Trust

The Texas Tribune reported this week that legislators in Austin have proposed a bill that would forbid physicians from asking their patients about guns.  Joe Gibes has commented on this issue in this blog (“It’s Not Primarily About the Guns” on Sept. 12, 2014).  In Texas, this is set against the backdrop of Open Carry legislation, a change in rules for those licensed to carry... // Read More »
March 20, 2015

Here’s Why I’m Guilty Of Experimenting On People

Last summer, Facebook received terrible press for running experiments on its users, adjusting the proportion of happy and unhappy posts at the top of people’s news feeds to see how that effected their moods. Shortly after that controversy surfaced, OK-Cupid … Continue reading

The post Here’s Why I’m Guilty Of Experimenting On People appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

March 18, 2015

Dealing with suffering

How we understand and deal with suffering plays a large role in how we see many issues in bioethics, particularly those involving the end of life. In his book Walking with God through Pain and Suffering Timothy Keller has some interesting thoughts on how different cultures have dealt with suffering. He suggests that that it is important for us as human beings “to learn how... // Read More »
March 17, 2015

Good Ethics Requires Bad News

Some bad news took me by surprise this week, taking the form of an article in the Annals of Family Medicine entitled, “Why Medical Schools Are Tolerant of Unethical Behavior.”  The authors described a medical school graduation ceremony in which the speaker thanked professors and healthcare professionals not just for competent and humane care, but for providing examples of “pure unethical behavior.” I wondered if... // Read More »
March 17, 2015

When Bioethics and Politics Intersect

This morning the Senate voted on an anti-human trafficking bill, The Justice for Victims in Trafficking Act, that would bolster legal protections for children who are victims of human trafficking. Up until this week, the bill had received bi-partisan support and was expected to pass with little opposition. However, this week discussion arose regarding a provision in the bill that referenced the Consolidated Appropriation Act of... // Read More »
March 16, 2015

Dignity and Destiny – Part 1

The following is the first in a two-part review of John Kilner’s new book entitled Dignity and Destiny: Humanity in the Image of God (Eerdmans, 2015). This review was originally published in the Spring/Summer 2015 (Vol. 4.1) issue of the Journal of the Christian Institute on Disability (JCID), for which I serve as Book Review Editor. Information on the JCID, including subscriptions and downloadable articles,... // Read More »
March 14, 2015

Feminism and Egg Donation

Two weeks ago, I wrote about the troubling lack of informed consent for egg donation. Many women are completely unaware of the risks and side effects of the procedure. But what seems to be the bigger, underlying problem is that there is a lack of regulation for and research about egg donation. The lack of regulation for egg donation is alarming on multiple levels. On... // Read More »
March 12, 2015

Taking Precautions

A common argument by ethicists concerned about the implications of bleeding-edge biotechnologies is an appeal to what is called the “precautionary principle.”  This appeal is particularly prominent on the European continent.  It attempts to raise concerns about the metaphysical, essential nature of a new technology, as opposed to the more pragmatist (and consequentialist) approach taken in Britain and the U.S.  I suppose that split should... // Read More »