Tag: bioethics

Blog Posts (331)

April 8, 2016

“The Enormity of the Moral Mission of Medicine”

As I write, Paul Kalanithi’s book When Breath Becomes Air sits atop the New York Times Bestseller List. I highly recommend it. It is beautiful. This book was written by a dying man. All books are, I suppose, but this author knew with more certainty than most that his time was short. Paul Kalanithi was finishing a grueling neurosurgery residency and on the cusp of... // Read More »
April 8, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: April 8, 2016

Can we trust robots to make moral decisions? Last week, Microsoft inadvertently revealed the difficulty of creating moral robots. Why Bioethics Has a Race Problem Moral imagination in bioethics has largely failed African Americans. The disturbing reason some African American … Continue reading
April 7, 2016

Fisher describes innovative approach to research involving vulnerable adolescents at OHRP conference

Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director and Marie Ward Doty University Chair in Ethics Dr. Celia B. Fisher gave the keynote address this morning at an Office for Human Research Protections (OHRP) conference, entitled “Vulnerable, Marginalized and At-Risk Participants in … Continue reading
April 7, 2016

Comments about Comments about “Vaxxed”

Dr. Ian Lipkin, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, writes in the Wall Street Journal this week that “Anti-Vaccination Lunacy Won’t Stop” (article freely available at the link). He is upset about the movie “Vaxxed,” which presses the claim that autism is caused by the vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR).  He is pleased that Robert De Niro dropped the film from the Tribeca Film... // Read More »
April 7, 2016

Comments about Comments about “Vaxxed”

Dr. Ian Lipkin, an epidemiologist at Columbia University, writes in the Wall Street Journal this week that “Anti-Vaccination Lunacy Won’t Stop” (article freely available at the link). He is upset about the movie “Vaxxed,” which presses the claim that autism is caused by the vaccine against measles, mumps, and rubella (MMR).  He is pleased that Robert De Niro dropped the film from the Tribeca Film... // Read More »
April 7, 2016

“Imago Dei” by any other name…

William Shakespeare reminded us that an object’s essence is not determined by the label we assign to it. No one has since proven Shakespeare wrong. Despite this fact, nowhere have labels been more strongly asserted than in the bioethical debate of abortion. Exactly what or who exists in the uterus of a pregnant human female? The list of labels is long and includes: “baby”, “the... // Read More »
April 4, 2016

#BioethicsSoWhite

  By Celia B. Fisher, Ph.D. In a recent article in the American Journal of Bioethics Kayhan Parsi of the Loyola University of Chicago Stritch School of Medicine exhorted bioethicists to address racism in their work. What the article did … Continue reading
March 31, 2016

A Brief Comment About Our Political Moment

Some comments are prescient, but some are more prescient than others. This is a bioethics blog, not a political opinion blog, but the general tenor of the current campaign and the headlines about the role of legal demands or prohibitions to address ethical matters seems to merit a brief general comment.  A political conservative writing some 50 years ago commented that political liberty demands an... // Read More »
March 30, 2016

Investigating fetal tissue research practices

A recent New York Times article discusses the special House committee that is investigating fetal tissue research in the US and allegations of violations of federal laws that forbid profiting from the sale of human organs or tissue. The committee is preparing to issue 17 subpoenas to medical supply companies and laboratories, seeking the names of researchers, graduate students, laboratory technicians and administrative personnel. The... // Read More »
March 28, 2016

The NFL & Research Ethics

It’s not every day that research ethics makes it way to the front pages of the newspapers. Usually those issues are addressed in other, less prominent venues. But last week’s New York Times article by Alan Schwarz, Walt Bogdanich, and Jacqueline Williams, “N.F.L.’s Flawed Concussion Research and Ties to the Tobacco Industry,” continued the controversial concussion discussion by reporting that the multi-billion dollar league omitted... // Read More »