Tag: bioethics

Blog Posts (240)

August 4, 2015

The Last Public Intellectual: the Legacy of Jon Stewart

by Kayhan Parsi, JD, PhD

A dozen years ago, polymath and federal appellate judge Richard Posner wrote a book called Public Intellectuals: A Study of Decline.…

August 3, 2015

Are Healthcare Profits Unethical?

I recently spoke with Audiey Kao, an ethics expert at the American Medical Association. Our conversation has been released as a podcast. We talked about quite a few things, but the part I enjoyed the most involved a gentle disagreement … Continue reading

The post Are Healthcare Profits Unethical? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

August 1, 2015

The Personhood Problem

This week, a New York judge dismissed a case seeking to free and grant personhood to two chimpanzees being used in studies by Stoney Brook University. Manhattan Supreme Court Justice Barbara Jaffe issued a thirty-three page document outlining the reasoning behind her decision. A higher court had ruled on a similar case last year, so she was bound to follow suite. The Nonhuman Rights Project,... // Read More »
July 31, 2015

On the Safety Argument Against Gene Editing

As discussed in an exchange earlier this year on this blog, one of the concerns about editing the human germline is that the risks to the next generation and future generations are not predictable, and the experiments to address those safety concerns cannot be done ethically.  Go here, and to the embedded links, to review.  Recently, Paige Cunningham and Michael Sleasman of the Center for... // Read More »
July 26, 2015

Atul Gawande’s Look at Mortality, Part 2

I was invited to write a review of the book, Being Mortal, by Atul Gawande recently. While not a Christian book, it addresses end of life issues of interest to all involved with bioethics. This is the second half of the review, the first of which can be found here. Nearly half of Gawande’s book reflects on final things, on letting go of life in... // Read More »
July 23, 2015

Responding to the “Dogma” charge

From time to time, conservative positions on bioethical issues—e.g., opposition to physician-assisted suicide—are met with a charge that religious “dogma” is asserting itself, sometimes successfully, against the dictates of reason.   This charge merits response, although I find it pretty weak.  I personally find it necessary to resist the temptation to be nothing more than a haughty moralist in responding.  Perhaps I am not alone in... // Read More »
July 22, 2015

Planned Parenthood and the moral standing of the medical profession

Last week I wrote about the idea that the acceptance of a set of objective moral standards is essential to physicians being members of a profession rather than simply being technicians. I discussed how violation of the long-standing Hippocratic prohibition of euthanasia leads to a degradation of medicine as a profession. This week Planned Parenthood has been in the news because of the distribution on... // Read More »
July 15, 2015

Physicians, the morality of euthanasia, and the Hippocratic Oath

In his post on Monday, Tom Garigan suggested that one of the primary reasons that those who favor physician-assisted suicide propose that physicians be the ones providing the means of death is that the involvement of physicians gives moral certification to what is being done. I think this is a very important insight. As I have thought about what he wrote I have been thinking... // Read More »
July 13, 2015

The Physician’s Imprimatur

In a previous blog response about physician-assisted suicide (PAS), Mark McQuain asked, “Why involve physicians at all?” That question gets too little attention. There are some easily discernible (and perhaps expressed) reasons why physicians are chosen to be the agents of assisting suicide. First, they have access to pain- or consciousness-relieving pharmacologic measures that also have the (in this case) desirable effect of stopping breathing... // Read More »
July 9, 2015

PAS Shelved (For the Moment) in California

California Senate Bill 128, the “End of Life Options Act,” has stalled in the state Legislature, and appears to have no prospects for passage this year.  The bill, which is modeled on Oregon’s physician-assisted suicide (PAS) law, had passed the state Senate 23-15, largely on party lines.  (There are 26 Democrats and 14 Republicans in the state Senate; all Republicans had opposed the bill and... // Read More »