Tag: biotechnology

Blog Posts (35)

February 27, 2015

Collating Some Resources about 3-Parent IVF

With the recent news that Great Britain will indeed forge ahead with the use of nuclear transfer techniques to create “3-parent babies,” in an effort to interdict maternally-inherited mitochondrial disease, and in light of Courtney Thiele’s February 9 post on this blog (with the associated discussion), I thought it might be useful to take a moment and pull together some links to past discussions on... // Read More »
February 23, 2015

Printing Resources & Prosthetic Hands

When discussing issues of technological development, specifically for use in the field of medicine, one aspect of bioethical consideration includes the determining the allocation of this new resource. In many (not all) situations, the allocation can be driven by cost: those who can afford the resource get it, while those who cannot afford it do not. While this does not completely seem out of line... // Read More »
January 31, 2015

Cinematic Cautionary Tales

As a Netflix aficionado, I have seen more than my fair share of movies that are centered around the dangers of misusing biotechnologies. To the undiscerning eye, they are nothing more than thrillers or action movies with great CGI, but a more in-depth look will reveal that these films act as cautionary tales. Tales that are often ignored. I could name dozens of movies that... // Read More »
October 17, 2014

Metaphor: Shopping

Story: a white couple ordered sperm from a sperm bank, stipulating that it be from a white man, for artificial insemination; however, in the delivery room, it was immediately apparent that they didn’t get what they ordered, as their newborn daughter was mixed-race. The couple is now suing the sperm bank for $50,000. In Tuesday’s Chicago Tribune, columnist Dahleen Glanton wrote a commentary on this... // Read More »
October 12, 2014

The Price of Drugs

Lesley Stahl of CBS recently did a story for 60 Minutes on the high price of cancer drugs.  Physicians at Memorial Sloan Kettering and M.D. Anderson have been seeking to remedy the “financial toxicity” of cancer drugs, something which has been mentioned in this bioethics blog as well. In Stahl’s story, Dr. Peter Bach of Sloan Kettering relates how a simple op-ed in the New... // Read More »
September 18, 2014

“Financial Toxicity”

Reflecting on cases from her own practice, a practicing oncologist recently suggested this in the Journal of Clinical Oncology:  consider high price a “toxicity,” or adverse side effect, of an expensive drug for cancer, just like nausea, infections, or having one’s hair fall out are toxicities.  Cancer doctors, especially in clinical trials, assess the severity of drug toxicities using an internationally-accepted, periodically-updated scale developed by... // Read More »
September 14, 2014

“Enhancement” and Moral Development

Oxford ethicist Julian Sevulescu and Swedish philosopher Ingmar Persson argue in their book Unfit for the Future: The Urgent Need for Moral Enhancement that now is the time to introduce neurological and genetic changes in people so they are willing to go along with various agendas.  They note that climate change is a big issue, but when a number of people are apathetic about the... // Read More »
September 11, 2014

Keeping up with Clinical Research with Human Embryonic Stem Cells

Unless one works daily in a specific area of biomedical research, it can be next to impossible to keep up with developments.  I have trouble keeping up with a reasonable amount of the progress in research for some cancers.  Trying to track stem cell research requires more bandwidth than I have.  Still, from time to time I do try to do at least a little... // Read More »
September 9, 2014

What Should We Forget?

In January MIT announced a research study published in the journal Cell that reported a way to erase traumatic memories in lab mice using a drug that makes the brain “more plastic, more capable of forming very strong new memories that will override the old fearful memories.” MIT opened its story by referring to “nearly 8 million Americans [who] suffer from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD),”... // Read More »
September 4, 2014

Is an RCT of an Ebola drug ethical?

The title question here is of course over-simplified.  The development of an experimental drug to treat a devastating disease, during an outbreak of that disease, raises many ethical concerns.  Perhaps the most urgent of these is how to make the drug available to as many people with the disease as possible, because the risk of the disease itself makes the risks of the drug more... // Read More »

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Published Articles (5)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 11 Issue 1 - Jan 2011

?Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me ? ?? A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 6 - Jun 2008

Review of C. B. Mitchell, E. D. Pellegrino, J. B. Elshtain, J. F. Kilner, and S. B. Rae. Biotechnology and the Human Good

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 6 - Jun 2008

Response to Open Peer Commentaries on Justifying a Presumption of Restraint in Animal Biotechnology Research

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 6 - Jun 2008

Justifying a Presumption of Restraint in Animal Biotechnology Research

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 7 Issue 10 - Oct 2007

Biotechnology and the New Right: Neoconservatism's Red Menace

News (3)

September 10, 2013 4:20 pm

Programmable DNA 'Glue' Self-Assembles Cells

Scientists interested in engineering tissue would like to find a way to get cells and other biological components to organize and assemble into an organ similar to the way they do naturally.

November 13, 2012 5:29 pm

Injectable Sponge Delivers Drugs, Cells, and Structure (R&D)

Bioengineers at Harvard have developed a gel-based sponge that can be molded to any shape, loaded with drugs or stem cells, compressed to a fraction of its size, and delivered via injection. Once inside the body, it pops back to its original shape and gradually releases its cargo, before safely degrading.

July 3, 2012 5:13 pm

A Surgical Implant for Seeing Colors Through Sound (The New York Times)

In his discussions with the hospital bioethics committee, Mr. Harbisson argued that this surgical technique could be used on other people. He said in particular that more sophisticated versions of the sensor could be used for reading, perhaps reducing the need for Braille.