Tag: biotechnology

Blog Posts (41)

April 16, 2015

A Drive-By Shot at the Concept of “Liberal Neutrality”

A couple of writings by Gregory Kaebnick, the editor of the Hastings Center Report, have my attention these days, and I hope to deal with them in my next few posts.  For the moment, I intend to seize on one point he makes in “Engineered Microbes in Industry and Science,” his chapter in a book he co-edited with Thomas Murray, 2013’s Synthetic Biology and Morality. ... // Read More »
April 10, 2015

“Computers Helping Computers Help People Help Computers”

That was how one wag, a fellow undergrad at my college in the late 70’s, rewrote “people making computers to help people,” the “tag line” that IBM was using in its TV commercials at the time.  It got a good laugh.  Indeed, it sounded more accurate than the original. Even more so now, I was reminded last week by an interview on the Fox Business... // Read More »
March 12, 2015

Taking Precautions

A common argument by ethicists concerned about the implications of bleeding-edge biotechnologies is an appeal to what is called the “precautionary principle.”  This appeal is particularly prominent on the European continent.  It attempts to raise concerns about the metaphysical, essential nature of a new technology, as opposed to the more pragmatist (and consequentialist) approach taken in Britain and the U.S.  I suppose that split should... // Read More »
March 6, 2015

“The Natural”

Saying nothing new, but trying to say it in a different way… One response to ethical problems posed by bleeding-edge biotechnologies is to assert that there are some things that ought not be attempted, some boundaries that ought never be transgressed, regardless of the supposed good that may be envisioned.  (I continue to hold that human IVF was one such boundary, but that was definitively... // Read More »
March 1, 2015

Fools Rushing In?

Trevor Stammers is our guest blogger for today.  Dr. Stammers is the Programme Director for Bioethics and Medical Law at St. Mary’s University, Twickenham in London.  Prior to St. Mary’s, he practiced as a family physician for 27 years and was a senior tutor in General Practice at St George’s, University of London.  He is also the editor for the multidisciplinary journal The New Bioethics.  Thanks... // Read More »
March 1, 2015

Fools Rushing In?

Trevor Stammers is our guest blogger for today.  Dr. Stammers is the Programme Director for Bioethics and Medical Law at St. Mary’s University, Twickenham in London.  Prior to St. Mary’s, he practiced as a family physician for 27 years and was a senior tutor in General Practice at St George’s, University of London.  He is also the editor for the multidisciplinary journal The New Bioethics.  Thanks... // Read More »
February 27, 2015

Collating Some Resources about 3-Parent IVF

With the recent news that Great Britain will indeed forge ahead with the use of nuclear transfer techniques to create “3-parent babies,” in an effort to interdict maternally-inherited mitochondrial disease, and in light of Courtney Thiele’s February 9 post on this blog (with the associated discussion), I thought it might be useful to take a moment and pull together some links to past discussions on... // Read More »
February 23, 2015

Printing Resources & Prosthetic Hands

When discussing issues of technological development, specifically for use in the field of medicine, one aspect of bioethical consideration includes the determining the allocation of this new resource. In many (not all) situations, the allocation can be driven by cost: those who can afford the resource get it, while those who cannot afford it do not. While this does not completely seem out of line... // Read More »
January 31, 2015

Cinematic Cautionary Tales

As a Netflix aficionado, I have seen more than my fair share of movies that are centered around the dangers of misusing biotechnologies. To the undiscerning eye, they are nothing more than thrillers or action movies with great CGI, but a more in-depth look will reveal that these films act as cautionary tales. Tales that are often ignored. I could name dozens of movies that... // Read More »
October 17, 2014

Metaphor: Shopping

Story: a white couple ordered sperm from a sperm bank, stipulating that it be from a white man, for artificial insemination; however, in the delivery room, it was immediately apparent that they didn’t get what they ordered, as their newborn daughter was mixed-race. The couple is now suing the sperm bank for $50,000. In Tuesday’s Chicago Tribune, columnist Dahleen Glanton wrote a commentary on this... // Read More »

View More Blog Entries

Published Articles (5)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 11 Issue 1 - Jan 2011

?Doctor, Would You Prescribe a Pill to Help Me ? ?? A National Survey of Physicians on Using Medicine for Human Enhancement

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 6 - Jun 2008

Review of C. B. Mitchell, E. D. Pellegrino, J. B. Elshtain, J. F. Kilner, and S. B. Rae. Biotechnology and the Human Good

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 6 - Jun 2008

Response to Open Peer Commentaries on Justifying a Presumption of Restraint in Animal Biotechnology Research

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 6 - Jun 2008

Justifying a Presumption of Restraint in Animal Biotechnology Research

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 7 Issue 10 - Oct 2007

Biotechnology and the New Right: Neoconservatism's Red Menace

News (3)

September 10, 2013 4:20 pm

Programmable DNA 'Glue' Self-Assembles Cells

Scientists interested in engineering tissue would like to find a way to get cells and other biological components to organize and assemble into an organ similar to the way they do naturally.

November 13, 2012 5:29 pm

Injectable Sponge Delivers Drugs, Cells, and Structure (R&D)

Bioengineers at Harvard have developed a gel-based sponge that can be molded to any shape, loaded with drugs or stem cells, compressed to a fraction of its size, and delivered via injection. Once inside the body, it pops back to its original shape and gradually releases its cargo, before safely degrading.

July 3, 2012 5:13 pm

A Surgical Implant for Seeing Colors Through Sound (The New York Times)

In his discussions with the hospital bioethics committee, Mr. Harbisson argued that this surgical technique could be used on other people. He said in particular that more sophisticated versions of the sensor could be used for reading, perhaps reducing the need for Braille.