Tag: clinical research

Published Articles (10)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 10 Issue 7 - Jul 2010

Review of The Ethics of Consent, eds. Franklin G. Miller and Alan Wertheimer

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 8 Issue 3 - Mar 2008

A Plea for Pragmatism in Clinical Research Ethics

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 7 Issue 6 - Jun 2007

Is it Sound Public Policy to Let the Terminally Ill Access Experimental Medical Innovations?

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 7 Issue 3 - Mar 2007

Determining Risk in Pediatric Research with No Prospect of Direct Benefit: Time for a National Consensus on the Interpretation of Federal Regulations

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 6 Issue 3 - May 2006

Promoting the Participation of Minorities in Research

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 5 Issue 3 - May 2005

A Review of: ?Ezekiel J. Emanuel, Robert A. Crouch, John D. Arras, et al., eds. 2004? Ethical and Regulatory Aspects of Clinical Research: Readings and Commentary

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 1 - Jan 2004

Author Responds to Letters on "Children in Clinical Research: A Conflict of Moral Values" (AJOB 3:1)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 4 Issue 1 - Jan 2004

Omitted Considerations and Populations: A Response to "Should Children Decide Whether They Are Enrolled in Nonbeneficial Research?" by David Wendler and Seema Shah (AJOB 3:4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 3 Issue 1 - Mar 2003

Children in Clinical Research: A Conflict of Moral Values

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 1 Issue 2 - Jun 2001

Money for Research Participation: Does It Jeopardize Informed Consent?

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News (1)

April 18, 2012 5:58 pm

Bioethicists urge less regulatory burden for low-risk comparative effectiveness research (EurekAlert)

In an opinion article published in this week’s theme edition of the Journal of the American Medical Association focusing on comparative effectiveness research, a team of Johns Hopkins University bioethicists argues forcefully for streamlining federal restrictions on at least some low-risk clinical comparative effectiveness research, instead of easing them – as is now proposed – solely for low-risk social and behavior research involving surveys, interviews and focus groups.