Tag: cultural

Blog Posts (2)

August 12, 2014

No Laughing Matter

Nanette Elster, JD, MPH

Like many people around the world, I was shocked to hear about the death of Robin Williams.…

May 23, 2013

Doctor, a Bitcoin for Your Two-Cents?

Jennifer Chevinsky, B.S.

When surfing online forums, I have become accustomed to expecting the unexpected; however, coming across a website about new economic currencies, I was surprised to find a forum entitled ‘Medical Consult for Bitcoins.’  On this forum, individuals have written about their medical problems, agreeing to pay for medical advice posted in a response by a fellow member of the anonymous online community. …

Published Articles (8)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

The Precautionary Principle and the Tolerability of Blood Transfusion Risks Koen Kramer, Hans L. Zaaijer & Marcel F. Verweij

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Decision making in pediatric oncology: Views of parents and physicians in two European countries Domnita O. Badarau, Katharina Ruhe, Thomas Kühne, Eva De Clercq, Anca Colita, Bernice S. Elger & Tenzin Wangmo

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 2 - Feb 2015

Ritual Male Infant Circumcision and Human Rights Allan J. Jacobs & Kavita Shah Arora

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 14 Issue 5 - May 2014

Ethical Conditions for Transnational Gestational Surrogacy in Asia Darryl Macer

AJOB Neuroscience: Volume 5 Issue 1 - Jan 2014

Brave New Love: The Threat of High-Tech “Conversion” Therapy and the Bio-Oppression of Sexual Minorities Brian D. Earp, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

If I Could Just Stop Loving You: Anti-Love Biotechnology and the Ethics of a Chemical Breakup Brian D. Earp, Olga A. Wudarczyk, Anders Sandberg & Julian Savulescu

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 11 - Nov 2013

The Difficult Case of Voluntariness as Autonomy in Anti-Love Biotechnology Hywote Taye

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 13 Issue 6 - Jun 2013

The Oys of Yiddish Paul Root Wolpe

News (68)

March 22, 2017 9:00 am

Monsanto Weed Killer Roundup Faces New Doubts on Safety in Unsealed Documents (New York Times)

The reputation of Roundup, whose active ingredient is the world’s most widely used weed killer, took a hit on Tuesday when a federal court unsealed documents raising questions about its safety and the research practices of its manufacturer, the chemical giant Monsanto.

March 9, 2017 9:00 am

China pledges to cut pollution and boost food safety (Science)

China’s central government is laying plans to curb pollution, increase food and drug safety, and boost scientific research—though supporting details are scarce.

Chinese Premier Li Keqiang outlined these and other major goals during the opening session of the National People’s Congress on Sunday. The congress discussions are not likely to result in new legislation specific to science but speeches by top leaders set the tone for policy over the coming year.

“Having reached the current stage of development, China can now advance only through reform and innovation,” Li said in support of his call to boost research efforts. China has “the largest pool of scientists, engineers, and professionals in the world, and their potential for innovation is truly tremendous.”

February 15, 2017 9:00 am

This stereotype is killing black children (Washington Post)

USA Swimming, the nation’s organizing body for the sport, has some 337,000 members — of whom only 1.3 percent are black. Today, nearly 60 years after the abolishment of Jim Crow laws that kept African Americans from pools and safe swimming places, many children still never get the chance to swim.

February 3, 2017 9:00 am

On 22 April, empiricists around the country will march for science (Science)

Some fear a demonstration led by researchers might only serve to paint scientists as an interest group, further politicizing scientific issues. And at least one veteran science lobbyist has urged organizers to make sure it’s a march for science, not scientists.

February 1, 2017 9:00 am

Meet the scientists affected by Trump’s immigration ban (Science)

Kaveh Daneshvar was thrilled when he was invited to speak at a molecular biology meeting next month in Banff, Canada. Daneshvar, a molecular geneticist, is finishing a postdoc at Harvard Medical School and Massachusetts General Hospital in Boston and preparing to go on the job market. He hoped that the conference talk would give him much-needed exposure to leaders in his field.

January 20, 2017 9:00 am

How Science Is Helping Us Understand Gender (National Geographic)

A “neutral space” is a hard thing for a teenager to carve out: Biology has a habit of declaring itself eventually. Sometimes, though, biology can be put on hold for a while with puberty-blocking drugs that can buy time for gender-questioning children.

January 17, 2017 9:00 am

The Life of a Disabled Child, From Taunts to Hate Crimes (The New York Times)

Since the days when my mother wouldn’t let my older brother go out to play stickball if I wasn’t with him, there’s been a lot of progress in attitudes toward those we now call developmentally or intellectually challenged.

December 19, 2016 9:00 am

2016 in pictures: The best science images of the year (Nature)

In a year of political turmoil and shock, science, too, came up with surprises. To document some of these wonders, photographers roamed the world, revealing objects from the microscopic to the cosmic in scale.

December 16, 2016 9:00 am

We need to feed a growing planet. Vegetables aren’t the answer. (Washington Post)

If we’re going to feed them and us, responsibly and healthfully, vegetables are not the answer.

December 12, 2016 9:00 am

Ohio’s new abortion law is an assault on Roe. Here’s why it won’t work. (Washington Post)

So have Ohio lawmakers made the right bet on what will happen once Trump is in the White House — namely, that a new Supreme Court lineup could overturn Roe?

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