Tag: Culture / Ethnicity / Gender / Disability

Blog Posts (27)

February 8, 2017

Caring and risk

One of the basic realities of the medical profession is that caring for the sick may at times involve risk to physicians and others who are providing that care. Sometimes the risk is relatively minor such as when we care for those with minor respiratory infections and may become ill ourselves. That seemed to happen to me every time I was on a pediatrics rotation... // Read More »
November 23, 2016

Christian ethics and the powerless

The recent political campaign and election week have had many of us thinking about politics and government. For those of us who look at bioethics from a biblical perspective we have had to think about how our perspective on moral issues affects public policy and how we as a people govern ourselves. What do we do when no one seems to support a public policy... // Read More »
October 24, 2016

Race & Physician Assisted Suicide

Is physician-assisted suicide only for white people? That is a question that came to mind when reading a recent Washington Post article by Fenit Nirappil that reports on the proposed “Right to Die” law in Washington, D.C.  The law is drawing opposition from members of the African American community. The Post article quotes a Georgetown Law School professor, Patricia King, who states, “Historically, African Americans have not... // Read More »
September 28, 2016

The cost-effectiveness of prenatal screening for Down syndrome

Because the British National Health Service is a governmental single-payer system decisions about what is covered in that system involve public discussion. That leads to public discussion of ethical issues that frequently manage to avoid the public eye in the US. A recent article in the Daily Mail talks about an issue that is being debated by the British NHS. They are currently deciding whether... // Read More »
June 15, 2016

Gender Indiscrimination

Steve Phillips has recently written in this blog about gender dysphoria and our culture’s struggle to respond consistently to it. Please see here for that discussion. North Carolina recently passed a law requiring individuals to use the bathroom of their biologic sex rather than their self-identified gender. This has resulted in claims of gender discrimination and gender phobia against those who do not wish to... // Read More »
November 26, 2015

Body Integrity: Choice vs Design?

In my search for new topics I ran across the obscure “Body Integrity Identity Disorder,” or BIID.  This is described as a condition—if, indeed, it is a legitimate diagnosis—in which a person is troubled by the presence of a perfectly healthy body part, nominally a limb, and wants it amputated to restore a sense of personal wholeness.  One 2009 review argues that this is a... // Read More »
November 25, 2015

Are we losing the concept of objective moral truth within the church?

I participated in two discussions in the past few weeks that have me concerned. The first was a discussion with the members of the Advisory Council that works with the Center for Ethics that I am involved with at Taylor University. We were discussing how we as Christians should live in a society that is rejecting Christian moral values more and more. One member of... // Read More »
September 16, 2015

Gnosticism and the transgender issue

Since June I have found myself coming back again and again to Robert George’s presentation at the CBHD summer conference. In it he talked about how our society has a concept of who we are as human beings that says we are non-bodily persons who inhabit or use non-personal bodies. This idea has its origins in Greek gnostic thought which was picked up by Descartes... // Read More »
August 29, 2015

“Our Family Secrets” Exposed — The Ethics of Whistleblowing

This week the Annals of Internal Medicine published an article so controversial they felt the need to publish an accompanying editorial, explaining their decision to publish the anonymous article. The article, “Our Family Secrets” describes two experiences where a health care provider has acted inappropriately while patients were under anesthesia. The editorial describes the acts with poignant alarm: “The first incident reeked of misogyny and... // Read More »
August 15, 2015

The Hippocratic Oath and #TransHealthFail

Earlier this month, the Twittersphere erupted with a new hashtag that quickly reached trending status: #transhealthfail Transgender people are sharing their negative experiences with health care using this hashtag. The experiences range from health care providers suggesting their patients get help elsewhere, even if their problems weren’t related to their sexuality, to blatantly making unprofessional comments about their sexual identity, even going so far as... // Read More »

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