Tag: end of life

Blog Posts (63)

March 28, 2015

Call to Action: Quality of Life

Earlier this month BBC News reported on Chris Graham, a 39-year-old man with early onset Alzheimer’s disease, an extremely rare gene mutation, which killed Chris’ father at 42-years-old. Graham, has a newborn son, to whom he may have passed on the gene mutation, but Graham remains hopeful, saying, “If we can put a man on the Moon then surely we can find a cure for... // Read More »
March 27, 2015

California PAS Bill Passes State Senate Committee

That’s the page 1 story in my local paper this morning (Thursday, March 26).  The California State Senate Health Committee passed SB 128 by a 6-2 margin.  The debate was accompanied by the usual testimonials, including one videotaped by Brittany Maynard before her suicide. Opponents raised appropriate arguments against the bill.  Perhaps the key statement was made by Dr. Warren Fong, president of the Medical... // Read More »
March 23, 2015

Will Ariadne Lead Us Through the Maze of End-of-Life Healthcare?

Note: The Bioethics Program blog will be moving to its new home on April 1, 2015. Be sure to change your bookmarks to http://bioethics.uniongraduatecollege.edu/blog/   by Richard Koo, Bioethics Program Alum (MSBioethics 2011) and Adjunct Faculty About four years ago, Susan D. Block, M.D. posted a blog on Harvard Business Review’s website as part of a series of […]
February 25, 2015

The Man Who Mistook His Life For A Hat

by Jacob Dahlke, Bioethics Program Alum (MSBioethics 2012) Our society tends to put on pedestals the celebrities among us, particular upon their deaths. For author Oliver Sacks, it is no different except that he is not yet dead. He did, however, recently announce in the New York Times that metastasized tumors were found in his body. […]
February 12, 2015

Which Doctor Should Carry Out the End of Life Conversation?

Yesterday, Steve Phillips echoed my support for Dr. Atul Gawande’s book, Being Mortal.  One of Dr. Gawande’s key points is how difficult it can be for doctors to talk with their patients about care at the end of life, when the doctor cannot “fix” the problem.  Steve also raised the difficulty of these discussions in his January 28 post on this blog. This past Tuesday,... // Read More »
February 12, 2015

How to Die in Canada

by Sean Philpott-Jones, Director of the Center for Bioethics and Clinical Leadership Last week, our neighbors to the north took a huge step towards legalizing physician aid-in-dying. On Friday, the Supreme Court of Canada unanimously struck down that country’s ban on the practice, suspending two sections of the Criminal Code that outlawed assisted suicide and […]
February 11, 2015

Debate on Physician Assisted Suicide

Here's a debate on Physician Assisted Suicide at higher than the normal level of discourse. Enjoy!
February 11, 2015

Something to live for

I just finished reading Atul Gawande’s book Being Mortal and would recommend it to anyone interested in the issues surrounding death and dying. In the book Gawande comes across as both a caring physician and an engaging author. He weaves together the things he has learned about how we die and stories of the lives of a number of people as the live out the... // Read More »
February 5, 2015

What Drives Physician Support for PAS?

On January 8, I wrote about increasing physician support for physician-assisted suicide (PAS)—up from 46% of surveyed MDs in 2010 to 54% now.  Only 31% were flatly against it.  The remaining 15% give qualified support—“it depends.” Now, Medscape sends a follow up (registration required), regarding the reasons their surveyed physicians gave for their answer.  The title of this report:  “Is religion why docs are against... // Read More »
January 29, 2015

Wall Street Journal readers weigh in on PAS

Last Saturday, the Wall Street Journal carried an excellent op-ed piece, “Dr. Death Makes a Comeback” (subscription required), by Dr. Paul McHugh, former chief psychiatrist at Johns Hopkins Hospital.  In it, Dr. McHugh opposes physician-assisted suicide (PAS), making three key points: The practice will tend to spread beyond terminally ill people to those who are “treatable but mentally troubled.”  He appeals to the experience in... // Read More »