Tag: end of life

Blog Posts (100)

May 25, 2016

Why do families have different expectations at the end of life than physicians?

I have a friend who is a funeral director. I am a family physician. One of the things that we have in common is that we both deal with death and dying and how families deal with the death of a loved one. The other day he was wondering out loud why families call the ambulance service when their loved one is clearly dead, and... // Read More »
May 23, 2016

Brain Cancer Awareness Month

Watching “60 Minutes” last week reminded me of why I pursued a degree in bioethics. The segment was on Duke University’s experimental treatment of glioblastoma patients and its surprising success treating this deadly cancer. There is a cautious optimism associated with this new treatment, which was granted “breakthrough status” by the FDA earlier this month. Immediately I was thrown back to 2010 when my wife’s... // Read More »
May 12, 2016

Doctors Push the PAS Envelope

Over at his “Human Exceptionalism” blog, Wesley Smith has had a steady stream of recent posts about physician-assisted suicide (PAS), also called “physician-aid-in-dying” or “medical-aid-in-dying” (MAID).  “Hat tip” to Mr. Smith for the story that introduced me to the “MAID” acronym.  It is reported that Ontario’s College of Physicians and Surgeons think that the proposed law being considered by the Canadian federal government to allow... // Read More »
May 8, 2016

Medical errors and more medical errors

Last week the BMJ reported that annually, there are 251,000 hospital deaths due to preventable medical errors in the US. There’s some debate about the calculations that they used to arrive at that number, and about what exactly constitutes a medical error. However, rather than quibble over the fine points, let’s acknowledge that medical errors are an ethical problem that must be addressed. In this... // Read More »
May 8, 2016

Medical errors and more medical errors

Last week the BMJ reported that annually, there are 251,000 hospital deaths due to preventable medical errors in the US. There’s some debate about the calculations that they used to arrive at that number, and about what exactly constitutes a medical error. However, rather than quibble over the fine points, let’s acknowledge that medical errors are an ethical problem that must be addressed. In this... // Read More »
May 8, 2016

Medical errors and more medical errors

Last week the BMJ reported that annually, there are 251,000 hospital deaths due to preventable medical errors in the US. There’s some debate about the calculations that they used to arrive at that number, and about what exactly constitutes a medical error. However, rather than quibble over the fine points, let’s acknowledge that medical errors are an ethical problem that must be addressed. In this... // Read More »
April 25, 2016

A brief thought on rising suicide rates

A recent article in The Washington Post describes a very disturbing trend: “The U.S. suicide rate has increased sharply since the turn of the century, led by an even greater rise among middle-aged white people, particularly, women, according to federal data released Friday [April 22]” The article offers some suggestions as to why things have been so grim: last decade’s severe recession, drug addiction, social isolation,... // Read More »
April 15, 2016

Doctor-Assisted Suicide in Canada: the Next Step

The general press is reporting that the Liberal majority in Canada has drafted proposed legislation to establish the conditions under which physician-assisted suicide (PAS) would be legal.  Per the Canadian Supreme Court’s order last year that PAS is allowed in Canada, the Parliament has until June 6 to pass it, or the Court’s prior order would come into force.  This would effectively leave judgments of... // Read More »
April 8, 2016

“The Enormity of the Moral Mission of Medicine”

As I write, Paul Kalanithi’s book When Breath Becomes Air sits atop the New York Times Bestseller List. I highly recommend it. It is beautiful. This book was written by a dying man. All books are, I suppose, but this author knew with more certainty than most that his time was short. Paul Kalanithi was finishing a grueling neurosurgery residency and on the cusp of... // Read More »
April 1, 2016

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: April 1, 2016

Heroin Epidemic Is Yielding to a Deadlier Cousin: Fentanyl Cheaper and far more potent, the synthetic painkiller is becoming the drug of choice for some addicts — and is killing them more quickly. Who’s “They?” We are witnessing a great … Continue reading