Tag: end of life

Blog Posts (107)

September 16, 2016

Observations from a recent discussion of doctor-assisted suicide

Early this past June, the Annual Meeting of the American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO) included an ethics session featuring a point-counterpoint discussion, with audience Q+A, of “physician aid in dying,” or, as I think more accurate, “physician-assisted suicide (PAS).”  Discussants were Dr. Timothy Quill, a palliative care specialist who is a past plaintiff in court cases seeking legal approval of PAS, and Dr. Daniel... // Read More »
September 7, 2016

Positive rights and the tyranny of political power

Thanks go to Jon Holmlund for making us aware of the “Consensus Statement on Conscientious Objection in Healthcare” written by Julian Savulescu and a like-minded group of philosophers and ethicists. The statement, which represents one extreme in the discussion of rights of conscience and not a consensus of all those involved in this issue, seeks to transform negative rights into positive rights. That is, they... // Read More »
September 2, 2016

Evil on its Face

In June of this year, a group of ethicists—should I say that I use that term loosely?—issued a “consensus statement” to guide legislation and institutional policy regarding conscientious objection in medicine.  Conscientious objection, they explained, “is the refusal to provide a certain medical service, for example an abortion or medical assistance in dying, because it conflicts with the practitioner’s moral views.”  Their words, not mine.... // Read More »
August 17, 2016

The need for believers to base moral decision on biblical concepts

The article “I’m a Christian with Stage IV Cancer. I Want Death with Dignity.” by Corinne Johns-Treat on time.com that Neil Skjoldal discussed in his post on Monday illustrates a problem within the church that I have become very concerned about. I have written about this concern before in the context of what I hear from students at the Christian university where I teach, but... // Read More »
August 13, 2016

A novel strategy for suicide prevention

In the Netherlands, a doctor will not be prosecuted for assisting a patient to die either through euthanasia or assisted suicide (EAS) if certain conditions are met, among which are the following: The patient’s request for aid-in-dying must be voluntary and well-informed, without coercion from others, and uninfluenced by psychological illness or drugs; their suffering should be unbearable and hopeless, with no prospect for improvement... // Read More »
August 1, 2016

Is assisted suicide ethically permissible if it is rare?

A recent JAMA article (subscription needed) shares the findings of a study which considers the “Attitudes and Practices of Euthanasia and Physician-Assisted Suicide in the United States, Canada, and Europe.”  As California has become the most recent state to add an “assisted death” law to the books, it is important to consider how the practices of euthanasia and physician-assisted suicide are viewed in places that... // Read More »
July 28, 2016

Some California Physicians are trying to fight back against Doctor-Assisted Suicide

The Wall Street Journal op-ed page this week carried an offering (subscription required) from one Dr. Philip Driesbach, a cancer doctor in California who is one of six plaintiffs on a lawsuit attempting to block California’s new “End of Life Options Act,” which went into effect July 9.  Dr. Driesbach’s article covers several key points: ·       By allowing such individuals as potential heirs and the... // Read More »
May 25, 2016

Why do families have different expectations at the end of life than physicians?

I have a friend who is a funeral director. I am a family physician. One of the things that we have in common is that we both deal with death and dying and how families deal with the death of a loved one. The other day he was wondering out loud why families call the ambulance service when their loved one is clearly dead, and... // Read More »
May 23, 2016

Brain Cancer Awareness Month

Watching “60 Minutes” last week reminded me of why I pursued a degree in bioethics. The segment was on Duke University’s experimental treatment of glioblastoma patients and its surprising success treating this deadly cancer. There is a cautious optimism associated with this new treatment, which was granted “breakthrough status” by the FDA earlier this month. Immediately I was thrown back to 2010 when my wife’s... // Read More »
May 12, 2016

Doctors Push the PAS Envelope

Over at his “Human Exceptionalism” blog, Wesley Smith has had a steady stream of recent posts about physician-assisted suicide (PAS), also called “physician-aid-in-dying” or “medical-aid-in-dying” (MAID).  “Hat tip” to Mr. Smith for the story that introduced me to the “MAID” acronym.  It is reported that Ontario’s College of Physicians and Surgeons think that the proposed law being considered by the Canadian federal government to allow... // Read More »