Tag: environment

Blog Posts (12)

March 10, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 10, 2017

Politics White House Slammed by Federal Ethics Chief for Not Disciplining Kellyanne Conway U.S. government’s official ethics watchdog blasted White House for not taking disciplinary action against senior counselor Kellyanne Conway for promoting Ivanka Trump’s products on TV Trump’s Ethics Order Seen as Boost for Shadow Lobbying President Trump’s speech to the joint session of Congress … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: March 10, 2017
February 3, 2017

Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 3, 2017

  Politics Betsy DeVos’s ethics review raises further questions for Democrats and watchdogs Betsy DeVos, Trump’s nominee to lead the Education Department, promised to divest from more than 100 entities to avoid potential conflicts of interest with her new job. Questions left unanswered. Donald Trump warned over ‘unprecedented’ plan to appoint cabinet without ethics office … More Ethics & Society Newsfeed: February 3, 2017
December 14, 2016

The Ethics of Climate Change Activism: Fear vs. Reality

STUDENT VOICES By: Chelsea Zantay This essay is in response to the Carnegie Council for Ethics in International Affairs video clip “Global Ethics Forum: Ethics Matter: A Conversation with Bill McKibben.”   Often when a problem is too big or too scary we throw up our hands and announce that “there is nothing we can do” … More The Ethics of Climate Change Activism: Fear vs. Reality
May 12, 2016

Why Science Denial is Immoral

By Christopher S. Kovel, M.A. Today’s society is built and shaped by technology and scientific discovery but, surprisingly, pervading scientific denial lingers. Irrational skepticism and flat-out denial of uncontroversial theories is not just a rebuke of the facts of science … Continue reading
April 24, 2015

Human Remains for Compost: Repugnant or Resourceful?

<p><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">I am a lousy gardener. Just this year I am considering a small attempt at growing a few vegetables organically in my backyard. Maybe it was the long winter, maybe it is a drive to live more sustainably, maybe it is the challenge of overcoming decades of plant growing failures. After carefully selecting a few packets of easy to grow seeds and starting a few slow-growers inside, I have turned my attention to creating the best growing environment for these fragile plants. Part of this effort includes learning how to create compost from kitchen and yard waste materials. While I search for a suitable compost bin to take position behind the garage, I am diligently collecting fruit cores, egg shells, coffee grounds, and discarded greens in airtight containers in my fridge. Researching my options, I stumbled across an article that had me doing a double take, “A Project to Turn Corpses Into Compost” in the </span><a style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;" href="http://www.nytimes.com/2015/04/14/science/a-project-to-turn-corpses-into-compost.html?action=click&amp;contentCollection=N.Y.%20%2F%20Region&amp;module=MostEmailed&amp;version=Full&amp;region=Marginalia&amp;src=me&amp;pgtype=article&amp;_r=0">New York Times</a><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> online. I gasped in horror. Could this possibly be an ethical option for burial? Could this be legal? Was this environmentally safe? Was this a joke?</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> </span></p>
March 12, 2015

War Against Science 2.0: If You Can’t Beat ‘Em, Ban ‘Em

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

That’s the good thing about science: It’s true whether or not you believe in it. That’s why it works-Neil deGrasse Tyson

The data of climate change is very strong: warmest average years on record, increasing extreme weather, higher carbon dioxide levels, changes in sea level, increasing droughts, decreasing snowpacks and sea ice, melting glaciers and permafrost, warmer oceans and increasing ocean acidity.…

February 11, 2015

Improve Health by Returning to Nature

<p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">It’s a challenging time of year for those of us living in the snowbound regions of North America. Cold temperatures limit outdoor activity to quick spurts broken up by the need to get warm and sunshine can be hard to come by. Ground hogs are disrupted from their morning naps every Feb. 2 to see if warmer days will be welcomed back sooner rather than later. We yearn for the return of leafy trees, green grass, and less slippery walkways. Science has taken an interest in just what we gain from exposure to nature, and it seems there is more to it than simply wishing winter a glad farewell.</span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">  </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Though we may consider it common sense that people feel better when they get outdoors, breathe fresh air, and spend time in green spaces filled with grass and trees, there is a growing body of literature to back it up.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"></span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">According to the NYS <a href="http://www.dec.ny.gov">Department of Environmental Conservation</a> </span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">spending time in forests makes us healthier.  The noted benefits include: boosts immunity, reduces stress, lowers blood pressure and improves mood, helps with focus and concentration, increases energy, and improves sleep. “Recognizing those benefits, in 1982, the Japanese Ministry of Agriculture, Forestry and Fisheries even coined a term for it: shinrin-yoku. It means taking in the forest atmosphere or "<a href="http://www.dec.ny.gov">forest bathing</a>," and the ministry encourages people to visit forests to relieve stress and improve health”</span><span style="font-size: 11.1999998092651px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">. It seems they are onto something important here. Rx: Forest time.</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; line-height: 19.0400009155273px; font-size: 12px;"> </span></p>
June 28, 2010

July Arrives Early for AJOB!

The July issue of The American Journal of Bioethics arrives early with three fascinating articles–two about sex (one the biological kind, the other the active kind) and the other about transhumanism.…

April 27, 2010

Green in Life, Green in Death

The environmental craze has extended to the funeral industry–at least in California. You can now, apparently, “go out green” and find a way to find a “an eco-friendlier alternative to cremation and burial” called water resolution, says the Arizona Daily Star.…

December 29, 2008

Eat a Kangaroo--Save the Planet?

As far as environmental ethics issues go, this one takes the cake. But research done in New Zealand by the Pastoral Greenhouse Gas Research Consortium suggest that eating meat from animals that produce significant amounts of gases that harm the environment simply will not do.…

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News (2)

April 5, 2012 1:55 pm

Move to Market Gene-Altered Pigs in Canada Is Halted (NY Times)

A Canadian project aimed at creating a genetically engineered pig whose manure would be less harmful to the environment is being halted after failure to find a company willing to bring the animal to market, according to the lead researcher. The less polluting pig, called the “enviropig,” has a gene that allows it to better digest phosphorous in its food, therefore reducing the amount of phosphorous in the manure.

March 27, 2012 4:02 pm

For Pennsylvania's Doctors, a Gag Order on Fracking Chemicals (The Atlantic)

Under a new law, doctors in Pennsylvania can access information about chemicals used in natural gas extraction — but they won’t be able to share it with their patients. A provision buried in a law passed last month is drawing scrutiny from the public health and environmental community, who argue that it will “gag” doctors who want to raise concerns related to oil and gas extraction with the people they treat and the general public.