Tag: Ethics

Blog Posts (11)

September 14, 2016

Fordham’s Dr. Elizabeth Yuko Address Ethics of Web Self-Diagnoses

Millions of people use websites like WebMD every day to gain insight on a range of medical issues from cancer to mental health. This practice, or “cyberchondria,” is a new digital phenomenon that has resulted from online databases of free, … Continue reading
September 8, 2016

Fordham RETI Fellow Addresses Stigma for HIV-Positive Gay and Bisexual Men

The minority stress theory suggests that health disparities experienced by gay and bisexual men (GBM) and other sexual minorities can be explained in terms of stigma-related stressors such as discrimination at work, school, religious institutions, communities and families. The unique … Continue reading
August 31, 2016

Relying on Psychological Assessments do not Right Death Penalty Wrongs for the Intellectually Disabled

Although the death penalty is on the decline in the United States, the case of James Rhodes highlights the ethical quagmire facing forensic psychiatrists and psychologists whose evaluations contribute whether persons with intellectual disabilities convicted of murder will live or die. In addition to the increasingly familiar racial … Continue reading
August 24, 2016

Jailing for Dollars: The Federal Government Takes Steps to Eliminate a Moral Stain on Justice in the US

The United States has become the world’s leading jailer with 2.2 million people in jails and prisons across the country.  With a combination of government and privately run facilities, the nation faces the moral issues surrounding the prison-industrial complex.  As … Continue reading
August 16, 2016

Psychologists who “Analyze” Trump are Violating the Public Trust

As the 2016 presidential election approaches, psychologists are gaining media attention by diagnosing candidates as having personality disorders, especially for the Republican nominee.  But the public should question whether or not offering these diagnoses is professionally ethical or in the service of … Continue reading
June 2, 2016

What is the Future of Ethics Education in Medical Schools?

By Micah Hester In 2004, Lisa Lehman and colleagues noted that “Despite widespread agreement that ethics should be taught [in medical schools], there is little formal consensus concerning what, when, and how medical ethic is best taught” (2004, 682).  Eleven years later, the Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education (PRIME) group in its Romanell […]
April 22, 2016

Dr. Celia B. Fisher Examines Whether IRBs Hinder HIV Research with LGBT Youth

The dearth of HIV prevention research on LGBT individuals under 18 years of age is at least partially a result of conservative Institutional Review Boards (IRBs), according to new research by Fordham University Center for Ethics Education Director Dr. Celia … Continue reading
October 30, 2015

Does the Thought of Money Make Us Dishonest?

Here is a game you can’t lose. You flip a fair coin ten times and every time it comes up heads, you get $20. Better yet, I won’t even watch you flip the coin, but instead will trust whatever you … Continue reading

The post Does the Thought of Money Make Us Dishonest? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

October 23, 2015

Russell Wilson’s Recovery Water: Miracle Cure or Magical Thinking?

Russell Wilson took a hard hit to the head in the NFC Championship game last year against the Green Bay Packers. His team, the Seattle Seahawks, won the game, but would Wilson, the team’s star quarterback, recover in time for … Continue reading

The post Russell Wilson’s Recovery Water: Miracle Cure or Magical Thinking? appeared first on PeterUbel.com.

September 22, 2014

Tobacco is Taking Over the World!

We’ve done a lot of things in the United States over the last few decades to curb tobacco consumption. We’ve warned people cigarettes will kill them, created persuasive ad campaigns to scare people away from cigarettes, and added a hefty … Continue reading

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Published Articles (6)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

The Precautionary Principle and the Tolerability of Blood Transfusion Risks Koen Kramer, Hans L. Zaaijer & Marcel F. Verweij

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 3 - Mar 2017

Using Social Media as a Research Recruitment Tool: Ethical Issues and Recommendations Luke Gelinas, Robin Pierce, Sabune Winkler, I. Glenn Cohen, Holly Fernandez Lynch & Barbara E. Bierer

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Problematic protocols: An overview of medical research protocols not approved by the LUMC medical ethics review committee Derek Gideon Tersmette & Dirk Peter Engberts

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Online public reactions to fMRI communication with patients with disorders of consciousness: Quality of life, end-of-life decision making, and concerns with misdiagnosis Jennifer A. Chandler, Jeffrey A. Sun & Eric Racine

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 11 - Nov 2016

Diagnosis by Documentary: Professional Responsibilities in Informal Encounters Alistair Wardrope & Markus Reuber

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 10 - Oct 2016

Governance of Transnational Global Health Research Consortia and Health Equity Bridget Pratt & Adnan A. Hyder

News (39)

March 22, 2017 9:00 am

Monsanto Weed Killer Roundup Faces New Doubts on Safety in Unsealed Documents (New York Times)

The reputation of Roundup, whose active ingredient is the world’s most widely used weed killer, took a hit on Tuesday when a federal court unsealed documents raising questions about its safety and the research practices of its manufacturer, the chemical giant Monsanto.

March 20, 2017 9:00 am

Informed Patient? Don’t Bet On It (New York Times)

As doctors, our goal is to help you, of course, and to do no harm. But we may actually hurt you, irreversibly. Not that this happens frequently, but it might. How does that sound? Ready to take the plunge? The secret is that informed consent in health care is commonly not-so-well informed. It might be a document we ask you to sign, at the behest of our lawyers, in case we end up in court if a bad outcome happens. Unfortunately, it’s often not really about informing you.

March 17, 2017 9:00 am

Beware emotional robots: Giving feelings to artificial beings could backfire, study suggests (Science)

Previous work has shown a discomfort with humanlike robots, with people ascribing more emotions to them. In a study published by the psychologists Kurt Gray of the University of North Carolina in Chapel Hill and Daniel Wegner in 2012, participants watched a brief video of a robot’s head either from the front, where they could see its “human” face, or from behind, where they saw electrical components. The ones who watched its face rated it as more capable of feeling pain and fear, and as a result they felt more “creeped out.”

March 15, 2017 9:00 am

OxyContin Maker Purdue Pharma Hit With Unprecedented Lawsuit by Washington City (NBC News)

In January, the city filed a first-of-its-kind lawsuit against Purdue Pharma alleging the drug maker “supplied OxyContin to obviously suspicious physicians and pharmacies,” ultimately failing “to prevent the illegal diversion of OxyContin into the black market.”

While other suits against the company by states and municipalities have accused Purdue Pharma of deceptive marketing — allegedly playing up OxyContin’s effectiveness while playing down its addictiveness — Everett’s lawsuit is the first to claim the company knew its drugs were being diverted and did nothing to stop it.

March 10, 2017 9:00 am

Drugs are killing so many people in West Virginia that the state can’t keep up with the funerals (Washington Post)

Deaths in West Virginia have overwhelmed a state program providing burial assistance for needy families for at least the fifth year in a row, causing the program to be nearly out of money four months before the end of the fiscal year, according to the state’s Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR). Funeral directors in West Virginia say the state’s drug overdose epidemic, the worst in the nation, is partly to blame.

March 3, 2017 9:00 am

A divided White House still offers little guidance on replacing Obamacare (Washington Post)

A meeting Friday afternoon between President Trump and Ohio Gov. John Kasich, his former rival in the GOP primaries, had no set agenda. But Kasich came armed with one anyway: his hope to blunt drastic changes to the nation’s health-care system envisioned by some conservatives in Washington.

February 28, 2017 9:00 am

Biologists propose to sequence the DNA of all life on Earth (Science)

Yesterday, at a meeting here organized by the Smithsonian Initiative on Biodiversity Genomics and the Shenzhen, China–based sequencing powerhouse BGI, a small group of researchers upped the ante even more, announcing their intent to, eventually, sequence “all life on Earth.”

February 27, 2017 9:00 am

U.S. researchers guilty of misconduct later won more than $100 million in NIH grants, study finds (Science)

Overall, 23 of the scientists (roughly 8% of sanctioned researchers) received NIH funding after receiving an ORI sanction. Of that group, 17 researchers won more than $101 million for 61 new projects. Thirteen continued to receive funding from NIH grants that had been awarded before being sanctioned.

February 23, 2017 9:00 am

How Silicon Valley Is Trying to Hack Its Way Into a Longer Life (Time)

Rather than wait years for treatments to be approved by federal officials, many of them are testing ways to modify human biology that fall somewhere on the spectrum between science and entrepreneurialism. It’s called biohacking, and it’s one of the biggest things happening in the Bay Area.

February 14, 2017 9:00 am

French auditors criticize €5-billion science super-campus near Paris (Nature)

France’s government auditor has taken a sharp swipe at efforts to develop a science super-campus near Paris that, by 2020, was supposed to rival the world’s top campus universities, such as the US Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT). More than €5.3 billion (US$5.7 billion) in public spending has been earmarked for the Paris-Saclay science cluster, the Court of Auditors estimates in an annual report published on 8 February — but the original vision of creating a large integrated research university there is “at a standstill”.

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