Tag: genetics

Blog Posts (32)

April 15, 2013

Medical Futility Policy Transparency

Thaddeus Mason Pope, J.D., Ph.D.

Faith Smith was born with Trisomy 18.  She was also diagnosed with a hole in her heart. …

January 25, 2013

Whose DNA is it anyway?

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

The 1000 Genomes Project has collected anonymous DNA samples from people all over the world. By looking at this massive data set, the project hopes to discover genetic components of diseases or traits.…

October 24, 2012

The October issue of AJOB is here!

This month’s issue includes a target article on whether or not to disclose research results from whole-exome sequencing to relatives of a family member who has died.  …

February 29, 2012

Meet Our New Associate Editor, Richard Sharp, PhD

The AJOB Editorial Office is proud to announce its has added five new members to its editorial group.  Over the next few days, we will introduce the members of our new editorial group to you, including our new co-Editors in Chief, our two new Associate Editors and our new Book Review Editor.…

October 18, 2011

Genetic Testing for the Injury Prone

Professional soccer teams (football to the rest of the world) are using high-powered science to give them a competitive edge. The most recent venture into the world of professional sport and science involves an “unnamed Premier League club” [that] has commissioned Yale University scientists to genetically test its players and attempt to identify genetic indicators that can serve as a warning sign to whether an athlete is prone to injury.” According to Bleacher Report, scientists claim that there are more than 100 genetic factors linked to being prone to injury.…

February 15, 2011

Eugenic or Not, Sterilization Makes Sense for "P"

The current case before a British judge as to whether a mentally disabled woman identified only as “P” should be sterilized has raised the ire of medical ethicists and the disability community.…

June 24, 2010

New Website is Match.com for Your Genes

Before I even describe the services purportedly offered by BeautifulPeople.com, let me quote Art Caplan who has summed it up better (characteristically so) than anyone else could: “It’s pure, utter nonsensical baloney, at best.

September 3, 2009

There's Something Different About You. And You. And Everyone Else You've Ever Met. They Are All Mutants.

It turns out it wasn’t all a bunch of rubbish when our parents told us as children that each one of us was very special, in fact unique, from everyone else.…

June 10, 2009

Who Cares About Preventive Care? Who Should?

The role and scope of preventive care in our healthcare system has been a perennial issue for decades. Emily Willingham raises the issue and its role in healthcare reform and are larger healthcare system in light of a recent encounter on Facebook and more:
I received a Facebook invitation today to join in signing a petition to require insurance coverage for genetic testing for breast cancer.

April 24, 2009

Moooove Over Elsie. We Know Your Entire Genome Now.

The Saint Louis Post Dispatch says that the sequencing of the cow genome is going to lead to more milk and better beef, but all I can say for sure is that it certainly is an interesting step forward in the world of genomics.…

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Published Articles (17)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genomics and Mental Health Treatment: Setting the Ethical Agenda Camillia Kong, Michael Dunn & Michael Parker

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 4 - Apr 2017

Psychiatric Genetics in a Risk Society Nicole Martinez-Martin

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

A Framework for Unrestricted Prenatal Whole-Genome Sequencing: Respecting and Enhancing the Autonomy of Prospective Parents Stephanie C. Chen & David T. Wasserman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 1 - Jan 2017

Modern Pregnancies and (Im)Perfect Babies Stephanie A. Kraft

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

Does Lack of “Genetic-Relative Family Health History” Represent a Potentially Avoidable Health Disparity for Adoptees? Thomas May, Kimberly A. Strong, Kaija L. Zusevics, Jessica Jeruzal, Michael H. Farrell, Alison LaPean Kirschner, Arthur R. Derse, James P. Evans & Harold D. Grotevant

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 7 - Jul 2015

Looking for Trouble: Preventive Genomic Sequencing in the General Population and the Role of Patient Choice Gabriel Lázaro-Muñoz, John M. Conley, Arlene M. Davis, Marcia Van Riper, Rebecca L. Walker & Eric T. Juengst

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 7 - Jul 2015

Preventive Genomic Sequencing in the General Population: Do PGS Fly? Mildred K. Cho

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 6 - Jun 2015

Imposing Genetic Diversity Robert Sparrow

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 6 - Jun 2015

Ruffling a Few Feathers Richard R. Sharp

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 2 - Feb 2015

Collectivizing Rescue Obligations in Bioethics Jeremy R. Garrett

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News (261)

March 14, 2017 9:00 am

Scientists Closer To Creating A Fully Synthetic Yeast Genome (NPR)

Scientists have taken another important step toward creating different types of synthetic life in the laboratory. An international research consortium reports Thursday that it has figured out an efficient method for synthesizing a substantial part of the genetic code of yeast.

March 13, 2017 9:00 am

Employees who decline genetic testing could face penalties under proposed bill (Washington Post)

Employers could impose hefty penalties on employees who decline to participate in genetic testing as part of workplace wellness programs if a bill approved by a U.S. House committee this week becomes law.

March 2, 2017 9:00 am

An epigenetics gold rush: new controls for gene expression (Nature)

Over the past few years, researchers have identified some of the machinery involved in regulating these marks. Each requires a writer to place it, an eraser to remove it and a reader to interpret it. As the identities of these proteins emerged, scientists have come to understand that m6A affects not only RNA splicing, but also translation and RNA stability.

February 28, 2017 9:00 am

Biologists propose to sequence the DNA of all life on Earth (Science)

Yesterday, at a meeting here organized by the Smithsonian Initiative on Biodiversity Genomics and the Shenzhen, China–based sequencing powerhouse BGI, a small group of researchers upped the ante even more, announcing their intent to, eventually, sequence “all life on Earth.”

February 24, 2017 9:00 am

The Birth of CRISPR Inc (Science)

As the science grew even more compelling and venture capital (VC) beckoned, the jockeying to start CRISPR companies became intense. The research community was rent apart by concerns about intellectual property, academic credit, Nobel Prize dreams, geography, media coverage, egos, personal profit, and loyalty. A billion dollars poured into what might be called CRISPR Inc.

February 23, 2017 9:00 am

How Silicon Valley Is Trying to Hack Its Way Into a Longer Life (Time)

Rather than wait years for treatments to be approved by federal officials, many of them are testing ways to modify human biology that fall somewhere on the spectrum between science and entrepreneurialism. It’s called biohacking, and it’s one of the biggest things happening in the Bay Area.

February 21, 2017 9:00 am

Harvard and M.I.T. Scientists Win Gene-Editing Patent Fight (The New York Times)

The Broad Institute in Cambridge, Mass., will retain potentially lucrative rights to a powerful gene-editing technique that could lead to major advances in medicine and agriculture, the federal Patent and Trademark Office ruled on Wednesday.

February 2, 2017 9:00 am

Gene drives thwarted by emergence of resistant organisms (Nature)

By studying the insects under more-natural conditions, scientists hope to better understand how to eradicate them — and malaria — using an emerging genetic-engineering technology called gene drives. The technique can quickly disseminate genetic modifications in wild populations through an organism’s offspring, prompting some activists to call for it to be shelved. Yet gene drives might not be as effective as activists think. Recent research has identified a major hurdle to using them to eliminate diseases and vanquish invasive pests: evolution.

January 19, 2017 9:00 am

Pharmacological rescue of diabetic skeletal stem cell niches (Science)

Stem cells: The key to boosting bone healing in diabetes

January 18, 2017 9:00 am

Rewriting The Code of Life (The New Yorker)

Until crispr came along, biologists lacked the tools to force specific genetic changes across an entire population. But the system, which is essentially a molecular scalpel, makes it possible to alter or delete any sequence in a genome of billions of nucleotides. By placing it in an organism’s DNA, scientists can insure that the new gene will copy itself in every successive generation.

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