Tag: global health

Blog Posts (7)

October 26, 2014

Authorship in Global Health Research

<p><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">In a recent paper published in <em><a href="http://www.biomedcentral.com/content/pdf/1472-6939-15-42.pdf">BMC Medical Ethics</a></em></span><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">, my co-authors and I argued that there are unique issues in authorship in the context of global health research (GHR).</span><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Global health places priority on improving and ensuring equity in health worldwide. GHR is often multi/interdisciplinaryand involves large collaborative networks. Our analysis of authorship GHR applies to situations where researchers from high income countries (HICs) partner with those in low and middle-income countries (LMICs). First, let’s start by illustrating an example of a GHR research project. Let’s say that researchers wanted to study the genetics of a tropical disease. They wrote and succeeded in obtaining a U.S. National Institutes of Health funded grant. HIC researchers may bring to the collaboration scientific expertise, access to genomics/proteomic technologies, and may have been the main PI on the grant. LMIC researchers may be from a nation affected with the disease and can also provide scientific expertise, insight into local perceptions and realities, and access to the study population – the latter especially being difficult for HIC researchers given possible issues surrounding trust. Together, the team may gather epidemiological genetic data relevant to international public health interventions and also help address local needs and interests.</span></p> <p><strong style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px; color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
October 14, 2014

Why we ignored Ebola until recently

by Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

Ebola burst onto the scene in 1976 when a thirty-old man arrived at the Yambuku Mission Hospital in Zaire complaining of severe diarrhea.…

August 27, 2014

Update: How Ebola Kills

<p>Eman’s emails arrive hours ahead of the news here. He wrote on Sunday, August 17:</p> <p><em>“An Ebola quarantine site was attacked and looted. News is that most of the patients have escaped. This is going to put more fear into the population. All this because people are denying the virus.  More people might get exposed.  I’m so weak I can’t wake up this morning. Its 6:00 pm and I am still in bed listening to the news.  All this happened in a very populated area called West Point. Got pain all over my body. Keep me in your meditations.”</em></p> <p>Emmanuel is a medical student in <a href="http://blogs.plos.org/dnascience/2013/04/25/dna-day-and-world-malaria-day-the-sickle-cellmalaria-link-revisited/">Liberia</a> whom my husband and I have been supporting since he contacted me after reading my human genetics textbook in 2007. Until the fever hit him last weekend, he dedicated himself to “sensitization,” educating the public about how to stay safe. But now he’s too sick and weak to venture out.</p> <p>His email from Monday, August 18, said only <em>“Need help!”</em></p> <p style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">Ricki Lewis is the author of "<a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="http://www.amazon.com/The-Forever-Fix-Therapy-Saved/dp/0312681909">The Forever Fix: Gene Therapy and the Boy Who Saved It</a>," St. Martin's Press, March 2012.  To read more blogs from the author, please visit her site at <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="http://www.rickilewis.com/">http://www.rickilewis.com</a>.</p> <p style="border: 0px; margin: 0px 0px 10px; padding: 0px; vertical-align: baseline; color: #333333; font-family: Georgia, 'Bitstream Charter', serif; font-size: 14px; line-height: 20.296875px;"><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
August 18, 2014

The raging Ebola epidemic in West Africa—will the key lessons be learned?

by Arthur Caplan, Ph.D.

Ebola, according to the World Health Organization (WHO) is out of control in West Africa.  The disease, which is transmitted by contact with contaminated blood or body fluids, or by close contact with a dead body infected with the virus, has killed more than 1100 people in Guinea, Sierra Leone, Liberia, and Nigeria. …

August 8, 2014

Ebola Outbreak Highlights Questions about Experimental Drug Treatment

<p class="MsoNormal">Questions regarding the availability and utilization of experimental drugs for treatment of disease have moved to the forefront following the apparently successful use of an <a href="http://www.cnn.com/2014/08/04/health/experimental-ebola-serum/index.html?hpt=hp_t1">experimental treatment</a> used for two American health workers treating the Ebola outbreak in West Africa. </p> <p class="MsoNormal">The questions that have been raised include both who such drugs should be made available to and under what circumstances they should be made available. An additional consideration is what processes should be put into place to assure that these decisions are made properly to allow patients with valid cases to obtain access while protecting ill people from inappropriate risks and suffering. An additional question which I will not delve into here is who pays for them. Health insurance does not pay for experimental treatments so someone else must. First I should clarify exactly what I mean by an experimental drug. I am referring to drugs that have a scientific rationale for their use and some scientific basis for believing they might work. I do not include cockamamie ideas with no reasonable basis simply because somebody thinks they should be used. I have <a href="/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/hubris-and-biomedical-research ">previously written</a> about physicians who chose to use unreasonable treatments.</p> <p class="MsoNormal"><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong> </p>
March 19, 2014

The importance of assisted reproductive technologies for women in “developing” countries

<p>While assisted reproductive technologies (ART) are common in most “developed” countries (the global North), in the global South (“developing” countries), ART is generally not available for a variety of reasons, most of which center around money. These resource-poor countries typically lack both qualified health-care professionals and facilities necessary for ART. Although some countries do have ART centers, the cost of ART is prohibitive for all but the extremely wealthy. Indeed, infertility is usually seen as a treatable problem only for the upper class primarily because the poor cannot afford basic health care let alone expensive treatment like ART. The fact that the majority of people in the global South cannot afford basic health care, which is typically seen as the top priority in health-care allocation, is another reason why ART are not readily available in the global South. Most public and private health-care funding goes toward primary care and not treatments that are often seen as elective and cosmetic, like ART.</p> <p>Yet, infertility can be considered a health problem according to the World Health Organization's broad definition of health – “Health is a state of complete physical, mental and social well-being and not merely the absence of disease or infirmity.” Infertility in the global South can have severe and interrelated social, economic, and health-related consequences for women. This is still the case when the woman is physiologically fertile but her partner has male factor infertility; she is the one who is generally blamed for the couple’s inability to have a biological child.</p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
December 14, 2012

AJOB's December Issue is Here!

This month’s issue features:

What Purpose Does Religion Serve for Bioethics?

Connecting Global Health Justice and Governance

Published Articles (4)

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 12 Issue 12 - Dec 2012

The Morality of Saved Lives Rajaie Batniji & Paul H. Wise

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 12 Issue 12 - Dec 2012

Global Health Justice and Governance Jennifer Prah Ruger

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 11 Issue 5 - May 2011

Beyond the IRB: Local Service Versus Global Oversight

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 10 Issue 11 - Nov 2010

Review of Brad Spellberg, Rising Plague: The Global Threat from Deadly Bacteria and Our Dwindling Arsenal to Fight Them