Tag: Health Care Practice

Blog Posts (159)

March 17, 2017

Equipoise and Caution Regarding “Ethical” Stem-Cell Therapy

You may have seen one of the many news reports this week about an “adult” stem cell treatment gone bad.  In it, doctors, not working in regulated industry or in the bounds of a clinical trial, injected stem cells derived from a person’s fatty tissue into the eyeballs of three people in an attempt to treat a vision-destroying condition called macular degeneration—and all three lost... // Read More »
March 11, 2017

But at least we don’t have socialized medicine

I just read T. R. Teid’s 2009 book The Healing of America. It’s a timely read in light of the bar brawl over health care that’s brewing in the U.S. legislature this week. Of particular interest are his snapshots of the health care systems of the UK, France, Germany, Japan, Taiwan, Canada, and Switzerland, systems about which I held many cherished misconceptions. All of these countries... // Read More »
March 9, 2017

“Assisted Suicide: The Musical”

The Wall Street Journal’s weekend edition for March 4-5, 2017 carried a “Saturday interview” (subscription required) with one Liz Carr, the creator and, I gather, star of a stage production in London called “Assisted Suicide: The Musical.”  In the article, we read that it received a standing ovation from a full house, but the show’s website shows a one-night-only run. The 46 year-old Ms. Carr... // Read More »
March 3, 2017

Heritable human gene editing and the public

The recent report by the National Academies of Science, Engineering, and Medicine includes a chapter dedicated to public engagement.  Scientists leading gene editing efforts have actively sought broader public engagement, and point out that they desire this input, including from people who disagree with them about it.  They may push to win any arguments, but for the most part they don’t seem to be hiding.... // Read More »
February 19, 2017

A Conflict of Interest is NOT an Ambiguity

Oregon Senate Bill 494 has been described as a “euthanasia bill” that is “intentionally ambiguous,” and as a piece of legislation that would “allow the starving and dehydrating of patients who suffer from dementia or mental illness.” What has received less press is the composition of the 13-member committee who would be perpetually in charge of advance directive forms in the state, with no oversight by... // Read More »
February 18, 2017

Advance Care Planning and its Detractors

The default mode of our technologically advanced medicine is to use our technology. Nowhere is this more true than close to the end of life. And our technology is really impressive; with it, we can keep chests going up and down and hearts beating for a long, long time. The troubling thing is that there are many people who would rather not have lots of... // Read More »
February 10, 2017

Apologies and Outcomes

What if a study shows that the course of action we know to be right doesn’t “work”? Or that it may even place us at a disadvantage? When bad things happen to patients in the course of medical treatment, doctors traditionally have avoided apologizing or even expressing sympathy to patients, for fear that such expressions would be used against them in malpractice court as an... // Read More »
February 5, 2017

Excuse Me, Doctor, What Exactly Do You Profess?

The late Edmund Pellegrino, M.D., revered medical educator, ethicist, and physician, often made the point that a professional professes something. Merriam-Webster  confirms that the etymology of the word, profession, includes the Latin for “public declaration.” The Hippocratic Oath, probably penned by members of the Pythagorean sect, according to Ludwig Edelstein (see Ancient Medicine: Selected Papers of Ludwig Edelstein. Baltimore: Johns Hopkins University Press, 1987), has for... // Read More »
January 27, 2017

“MAID” and organ donation

An article in the Journal of Medical Ethics (JME) assesses the ethical issues around organ donation by someone who requests assisted suicide or (“voluntary”) euthanasia.  (Subscription or purchase is required for access to the full article.)  The authors, specifically looking at the situation under current law in Canada, refer to assisted suicide and euthanasia with the blanket term “medical assistance in dying,” or “MAID” for... // Read More »
January 20, 2017

Conflicts of Interest in unsuspected places

Patient advocacy organizations — groups such as the American Cancer Society, the American Diabetes Association, the Arthritis Foundation — are non-profit organizations that seek to help patients with a specific disease or disorder by providing services to patients, sponsoring research, influencing government and insurance policy, and promoting and promulgating guidelines that are followed by doctors and patients to diagnose and treat disease. They are sometimes... // Read More »

View More Blog Entries