Tag: health insurance

Blog Posts (46)

June 25, 2015

What Physicians Can Learn from Veterinarians

A while back, I linked to a story by Rebecca Plevin, out of California Public Radio, on the challenge of discussing health care costs.  Well, she has tuned up that piece and placed it on Marketplace. Here is a print … Continue reading

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June 4, 2015

When It Comes to Controlling Healthcare Costs, the Government Outperforms Private Industry

When I think of the federal government, “efficiency” is rarely the first thing on my mind. But when it comes to controlling healthcare costs, we need to consider the possibility that the federal government is better at this job than … Continue reading

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April 6, 2015

Health Insurance Is About Financial Security Too

People like me, trained to be physicians, have pushed hard to promote health insurance in the United States because we believe, with some evidence to back up our claims, that good health insurance promotes better health. When people don’t have … Continue reading

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March 24, 2015

The High Price of Affordable Medicine

In the old days, blockbuster drugs were moderately expensive pills taken by hundreds of thousands of patients. Think blood pressure, cholesterol and diabetes pills. But today, many blockbusters are designed to target much less common diseases, illnesses like multiple sclerosis … Continue reading

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January 19, 2015

Why Buying A Car Is So Unlike Buying Healthcare

<p style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">Let’s say you are looking to buy a car. You think you might want to buy a Volvo so you go down to the Volvo dealer and check out the new models. But you are shocked by what you see. You realize that you really don’t need to spend $35 to $40,000, or more, on a new car, so you decide to visit the Subaru dealer. There you find very nice alternative models for thousands of dollars less. You are delighted to have a new Outback for about $27,000.</span></p> <p class="MsoNormal" style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The above story is how private markets and market choices work for the vast majority of items that we purchase to meet most of our needs as human beings. However, it has become painfully obvious that healthcare is an area where the normal model of markets and market choices do not apply. I’ll use a personal example.</span></p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="color: #000099; text-decoration: underline;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong><span style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 19.0400009155273px;"> </span></p>
December 4, 2014

Obamacare 2.0—Better than Version 1.0?

Paige Rentz, an excellent reporter at the Fayetteville Observer, recently posted a question and answer piece, exploring some of the pressing issues facing the second round of insurance enrollment, on the Obamacare health insurance exchanges. I suggest you look at … Continue reading
October 10, 2014

Yes, Obamacare is a Success

<p><span style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px;">When the Affordable Care Act, commonly referred to as Obamacare was under consideration there was an unrelenting partisan attack against both the proposed legislation and the president who proposed it. We were told that millions would lose insurance coverage, that the cost of medical care would skyrocket, and that government bureaucrats would be interfering with the health care relationship between us and our physicians. We were told that death panels would be making decisions to end the life of the elderly and infirm. We were told all sorts of things that were so ridiculous that I cannot recall them. The fact is we were told lies. Interestingly and importantly none of these things have occurred. The Affordable Care Act was designed to increase the extent of medical insurance coverage and the corresponding access to health care permitted by insurance coverage. The Affordable Care Act was also designed to slow the growth of health care costs. While it is true that there were initial technical glitches in its rollout, now a year after people could begin to enroll, and still only months after the initiation of most of its provisions it is clearly apparent that it is doing just what it was designed and implemented to do. Yes, the Affordable Care Act, Obamacare, is a success.</span></p> <p><strong style="line-height: 19.0400009155273px; color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a></strong></p>
June 18, 2014

Insurance Woes

A great cartoon from the Kaiser Health News website that pithily captures the “wonders” of the American health insurance system.   (Click here to view comments)
June 15, 2014

Insurance Coverage for Oncofertility: Concerns about Socioeconomic Disparities

<p>In a recent <a href="/BioethicsBlog/post.cfm/the-importance-of-assisted-reproductive-technologies-for-women-in-developing-countries">blog</a>, I asserted that assisted reproductive technology (ART) should be a higher priority for the global South because of the severe health, social, and economic effects infertility can have on women there. The most common response to this claim is that resources should first be devoted to treating and preventing life-threatening conditions, such as malaria and HIV/AIDS, rather than conditions that are perceived as merely social and/or psychological. The same response is often used when people suggest that ART should receive higher priority in the global North. Whereas many global North countries provide national health coverage for ART, the US does not. However, there has been movement toward coverage for ART in the US in the last couple of decades and currently 14 states require health insurance companies to cover ART (though there is a wide range of what is covered and under what circumstances). Unfortunately, oncofertility (fertility preservation for cancer patients) is <a href="http://oncofertility.northwestern.edu/sites/default/files/uploadedfilecontent/basco_et_al._2010.pdf">not covered in any of these state laws</a>.</p> <p>While I understand the argument that limited healthcare resources should be dedicated to the most "pressing" conditions, it is also important to recognize the potential side effects of choosing not to provide coverage for oncofertility and other types of ART. One concern with the lack of coverage for ART is that it reinforces socioeconomic inequalities. The <a href="http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC1955265/">primary users of ART</a> are white, educated, middle- and upper-class not because this group is the most likely to be infertile, but because they are the most likely to be able to afford the high cost of ART out-of-pocket expenses. Cancer patients from lower socioeconomic backgrounds are unlikely to have the large amount of disposable funds (the <a href="http://www.asrm.org/detail.aspx?id=3023">average cost for one cycle of IVF</a> is around $12,400) for fertility preservation treatment. While “traditional” infertility patients can save their money over a period of time in order to be able to afford ART, cancer patients need to preserve their fertility before their cancer treatment commences and thus they need to be able to immediately provide the cash for fertility preservation treatment in order for it to occur. </p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="http://www.amc.edu/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong></p>
June 10, 2014

The Readmission Problem

<p>No one seems to know what the answer is to keeping costs down in healthcare but grand efforts have been undertaken to find someone to blame. Some of the targets are patients, others are providers, and sometimes the insurers are dragged into the fray as well. The rhetoric is tired and worn on both ends.  Is it the folks with chronic diseases like diabetes? Is it the folks who need dialysis? The smokers? The patients who do not follow the doctors’ advice and stay sick and expensive? The people who want ‘everything done’ at the end of life? Is it the doctors who acquiesce to patient demands or the laws that obligate them to do so? Do doctors order too many expensive tests, bleeding insurance system? Is it the liability insurance that must cover them if they fail to order a test? Maybe it is the insurance companies paying high salaries to executives while handing down ever-shrinking reimbursements pressing institutions to find new ways to eek out enough income to sustain an operating budget. Newer to this menu are penalties for staying in the hospital too long and coming back too soon. This latest addition to the list is perhaps among the most absurd.</p> <p><strong style="color: #34405b; font-family: Arial, Helvetica, sans-serif; font-size: 12px; line-height: 20px;">The Alden March Bioethics Institute offers a Master of Science in Bioethics, a Doctorate of Professional Studies in Bioethics, and Graduate Certificates in Clinical Ethics and Clinical Ethics Consultation. For more information on AMBI's online graduate programs, please visit our <a style="text-decoration: underline; color: #000099;" href="/Academic/bioethics/index.cfm">website</a>.</strong> </p>