Tag: Health Policy & Insurance

Published Articles (5)

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Morals or markets? Regulating assisted reproductive technologies as morality or economic policies in the states Erin Heidt-Forsythe

AJOB Primary Research: Volume 8 Issue 1 - Feb 2017

Problematic protocols: An overview of medical research protocols not approved by the LUMC medical ethics review committee Derek Gideon Tersmette & Dirk Peter Engberts

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 17 Issue 2 - Feb 2017

Irrational Exuberance: Cardiopulmonary Resuscitation as Fetish Philip M. Rosoff & Lawrence J. Schneiderman

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 16 Issue 12 - Dec 2016

Does Lack of “Genetic-Relative Family Health History” Represent a Potentially Avoidable Health Disparity for Adoptees? Thomas May, Kimberly A. Strong, Kaija L. Zusevics, Jessica Jeruzal, Michael H. Farrell, Alison LaPean Kirschner, Arthur R. Derse, James P. Evans & Harold D. Grotevant

American Journal of Bioethics: Volume 15 Issue 4 - Apr 2015

Kaci Hickox: Public Health and the Politics of Fear Steven H. Miles

News (12)

February 17, 2017 9:00 am

An old drug gets a new price to fight a rare disease: $89,000 a year (Washington Post)

An old steroid treatment, long available outside the United States, received approval this week for a rare disease that afflicts about 15,000 Americans. Though not previously approved in the United States, the drug, deflazacort, has for years been available to patients suffering from the devastating and fatal disease Duchenne muscular dystrophy; families can import it from abroad for about $1,200 per year on average. The new list price for the drug? $89,000 a year.

January 24, 2017 9:00 am

With executive order, Trump tosses a ‘bomb’ into fragile health insurance markets (Washington Post)

The practical implications of Trump’s action on Friday are harder to decipher. Its language instructs all federal agencies to “waive, defer, grant ­exemptions from or delay” any part of the law that imposes a financial or regulatory burden on those affected by it. That would cover consumers, doctors, hospitals and other providers, as well as insurers and drug companies.

November 10, 2016 10:52 am

U.S. watchdog told Medicare, Medicaid that EpiPen was misclassified in 2009: senator (Reuters)

The internal watchdog at the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services warned the office tasked with administering federal health insurance programs that Mylan NV’s EpiPen was improperly classified as a generic drug in 2009, Senator Charles Grassley said on Tuesday.

November 9, 2016 8:00 am

Why the FDA wants to know how much Nutella you scoop out of the jar (Washington Post)

October 28, 2016 8:00 am

Big pharma is gearing up to defend drug prices (Washington Post)

The skyrocketing costs of prescription drugs has been noticeably absent from discussion in the presidential debates — even as bipartisan anger about price gouging has united Congress. But the trade group for the pharmaceutical industry, PhRMA, is gearing up to defend drug prices after the election, seeking an additional $100 million in annual dues from its members, according to a report from Politico.

October 3, 2016 8:00 am

Furor Over Drug Prices Puts Patient Advocacy Groups in Bind (NY Times)

Public anger over the cost of drugs has burned hot for a year, coursing through social media, popping up on the presidential campaign, and erupting in a series of congressional hearings, including one last week over the rising price of the allergy treatment EpiPen.

September 16, 2016 8:00 am

Employees Are Paying A Bigger Chunk Of Health Insurance Costs (NPR)

High deductible health plans are the new normal.  Just over half of employees this year have a health insurance policy with a deductible of at least $1,000, according to a survey of employers from the Kaiser Family Foundation.

March 8, 2016 12:51 pm

No Paid Sick Leave Means Workers Skip Medical Care

U.S. workers without paid sick leave are more likely to keep going to work when they’re sick and to forgo medical care for themselves and their families, compared to workers who do get paid for sick days, according to a new study.

March 3, 2016 12:50 pm

NY Attorney General to Investigate Insurers Over Hepatitis C Drugs

New York state Attorney General Eric Schneiderman’s office has asked 16 health insurers for documentation on patients who have been denied coverage of drugs used to cure hepatitis C, a person familiar with the matter told Reuters on Wednesday.

May 14, 2015 3:39 pm

U.S. says insurers must cover FDA-approved birth control methods

The U.S. government said health insurers must cover all FDA-approved methods of birth control without co-pays or charges to the patient, as it issued a paper on Monday looking to clarify coverage guidelines under the Affordable Care Act.

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