Tag: medical education

Blog Posts (39)

December 6, 2016

Lessons Learned from a Beatbox Heart

By Tim Lahey Two days ago, Jimmy stuck a used needle into the soft skin of his forearm, and released 20 milligrams of black tar heroin and a bolus of bacteria into his blood. The bacteria floated from vein to artery as he nodded, eventually sticking themselves to the ragged edge of his aortic valve.  […]
November 29, 2016

Our Devices, Our Selves: How to Avoid Practicing Distracted Doctoring

By Laura Vearrier Americans check their phones an average of 46 times per day, (Eadicicco 2015) and they do so no matter what they are doing, including while driving, while at church, during sex, or out to dinner. (Rodriguez 2013) Are healthcare providers any different?  In a survey of medical students, 46 % reported texting, […]
October 25, 2016

Memento Mori- Reflecting on my Death and the Education of Medical Students

By Laura Creel As part of their undergraduate medical education, students discuss end-of-life care; they hear lectures about valuing the lives and deaths of future patients; they are instructed in the legal issues surrounding advance directives and care planning.  They see death, too—see it in the cadavers that they incise, see it in patients who […]
September 27, 2016

Educating for Resilience and Humanism in an Uncertain Time

By Darrell G. Kirch We face a crisis of well-being in medicine. From the acceleration of science to the implementation of the Affordable Care Act, rapid change has become the “new normal” for our profession.  While many of the changes have the potential to revolutionize health care, they also create stress and uncertainty within our […]
August 24, 2016

The Value of Reflection in Clinical Teaching

By Patricia Stubenberg “No words are ofterner on our lips than thinking and thought.”  – John Dewey The teaching physician has opportunities for personal and professional growth through reflection and revisiting not only their own experiences in training and practice, but also their role as clinical teachers with medical students and residents.  Studies on reflection in […]
August 2, 2016

Learning Anatomy: Between Fear and Reality

By Wessam Ibrahim Learning Anatomy is a journey.  All medical students have some memories about their anatomy courses; some have good memories and some don’t. It’s October 1995.  I was a first-year medical student at my medical school in Egypt.  I had never seen a corpse except in horror movies.  I was so scared and […]
July 26, 2016

Self-Reflection Through a Glass, Darkly

By Josh Hopps It is the end of the USMLE Step 1 exam season in undergraduate medical education.  If UME is a solar system, Step 1 is the sun, irradiating and superheating some, leaving others cold and frozen out, and supporting life for those who thrive in intense and constrained circumstances.  Its enormous gravity pulls […]
July 18, 2016

Medical Education Research and IRB Review

By Emily Anderson Medical school curricula now emphasize evidence-based medicine.  We also need to prioritize evidence-based educational strategies.  There are some great educational innovations happening at our medical school, but too few publications highlighting these.  Conducting research on medical education faces many barriers, not least of all, lack of funding.  Publication in any peer-reviewed academic […]
July 5, 2016

Social Scientists in Medical Education: Important Contributors to the Educational Mission

By Bobbie Ann Adair White and Leila Diaz When we began our careers in medical education in the early 2000s, our roles (Student Affairs and Admissions) were adjacent to those of educators but not truly intertwined in content development and delivery. We found there were opportunities to create and lobby for co-curricular social sciences content, but […]
June 14, 2016

Sacred and Profane: Balancing the sanctity of the human body with the mechanics of cadaver dissection

By Michael Dauzvardis Often heard on the first day of anatomy lab: “Oh— I’m so glad the cadaver doesn’t look real. It is gray and ashen.  The skin is wrinkled and the head is shaven. I can do this— I’ll make the first cut.” In fall, in medical schools across the country, students begin their […]

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News (1)

July 10, 2012 4:28 pm

FDA unveils safety measures for opioid painkillers (Fox News)

Drugmakers that market powerful painkiller medications will be required to fund training programs to help U.S. doctors and other health professionals safely prescribe the drugs, which are blamed for thousands of fatal overdoses each year.  The safety plan released by the Food and Drug Administration on Monday is designed to reduce misuse and abuse of long-acting opioid pain relievers, which include forms of morphine, methadone and oxycodone. The agency’s plan mainly involves educating doctors and patients about appropriate use of the drugs.