Tag: medical school

Blog Posts (11)

August 24, 2016

The Value of Reflection in Clinical Teaching

By Patricia Stubenberg “No words are ofterner on our lips than thinking and thought.”  – John Dewey The teaching physician has opportunities for personal and professional growth through reflection and revisiting not only their own experiences in training and practice, but also their role as clinical teachers with medical students and residents.  Studies on reflection in […]
June 14, 2016

Sacred and Profane: Balancing the sanctity of the human body with the mechanics of cadaver dissection

By Michael Dauzvardis Often heard on the first day of anatomy lab: “Oh— I’m so glad the cadaver doesn’t look real. It is gray and ashen.  The skin is wrinkled and the head is shaven. I can do this— I’ll make the first cut.” In fall, in medical schools across the country, students begin their […]
June 2, 2016

What is the Future of Ethics Education in Medical Schools?

By Micah Hester In 2004, Lisa Lehman and colleagues noted that “Despite widespread agreement that ethics should be taught [in medical schools], there is little formal consensus concerning what, when, and how medical ethic is best taught” (2004, 682).  Eleven years later, the Project to Rebalance and Integrate Medical Education (PRIME) group in its Romanell […]
April 25, 2016

The Invitation

By Mary Boyle Looking for a way to bring real patients to students in pre-clinical years? Each year we ask our specialists to invite a few patients in to match a topic we are studying— Peripheral Vascular, Rheumatology, and Dermatology.  They kindly arrive at our lecture or small group sessions to show us the sequelae […]
April 18, 2016

Awareness Creation in Healthcare Should be a Priority in the Developing World

By Calvince Owiti I was born about two decades ago in a small village in Western parts of Kenya.  I grew up in a humble background, learning all that was relevant that time.  My grandparents were herbal medical practitioners.  I lived with them most of my early life even though my parents were still alive. […]
April 12, 2016

Social determinants: Why are they so difficult to address?

“He who knows only his own side of the case knows little of that.” John Stuart Mill, On Liberty. 1869 By Greg Gruener At a lecture I recently attended with our students, the guest speaker’s topic was on health disparities and the data presented was, as most of us in the healthcare field know, pretty […]
February 22, 2016

Four Ways to Increase Your Reflective Capacities: Heartbreak, Destroying Idols, Paradoxes, and Abandonment

By David C. Leach William Butler Yeats said: “We make out of the quarrel with others, rhetoric, but of the quarrel with ourselves poetry.” During the course of normal human development most people at some point have had their hearts broken, cherished beliefs challenged, paradoxes entertained or have been lonely or felt abandoned. Sometimes these […]
February 16, 2016

A Cut Above- A reduction in the number of cadavers and instructors actually improves the teaching of medical gross anatomy

By Michael Dauzvardis Time: midnight September, 2011 Place: gross anatomy lab Music playing softly in the background: Your Body is a Wonderland, by John Mayer “I’ve been at it for 4 hours and still can’t find the greater occipital nerve!” barks Joe, a first year medical student meticulously dissecting the posterior neck region on his […]
January 29, 2016

Welcome to the Ralph P. Leischner, Jr., MD, Department of Medical Education

The department brings together Loyola Stritch’s efforts regarding “teaching to teach and learning to learn.” We are part of the new era in academic medicine that gives the same priority to our educational mission as our research and service missions. We aim to turn out a diverse physician workforce who treat patients according to the […]
February 22, 2013

Importing Docs

Craig Klugman, Ph.D.

In a National Public Radio story on February 15, economist Dean Baker shared his idea that physicians should be looked at like any other commodity if we want to bring the cost of health care delivery down.

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News (2)

April 14, 2012 5:58 am

Pre-Med’s New Priorities: Heart and Soul and Social Science (New York Times)

Prof. Piers J. Hale knew something was up when his students at the University of Oklahoma were clamoring this spring to get into his medical ethics class, which was formerly populated largely by social science majors. What led to the sudden burst of popularity, he discovered, were plans by the Association of American Medical Colleges to revise the medical school admissions test to incorporate a hefty dose of social science.

April 13, 2012 11:02 am

Is medical school admission squashing creativity? (Unofficial Prognosis)

What does it take to get into medical school today? High MCAT scores. Pre-requisites galore, coupled with a stellar GPA. Research experience. Clinical experience. Volunteering. Is this system a root cause of the lack of creativity among people going into medicine?